SUPPORT US. If mindat.org is important to you, click here to donate to our Fall 2019 fundraiser!
Log InRegister
Home PageAbout MindatThe Mindat ManualHistory of MindatCopyright StatusWho We AreContact UsAdvertise on Mindat
Donate to MindatCorporate SponsorshipSponsor a PageSponsored PagesMindat AdvertisersAdvertise on Mindat
Learning CenterWhat is a mineral?The most common minerals on earthInformation for EducatorsMindat ArticlesThe ElementsBooks & Magazines
Minerals by PropertiesMinerals by ChemistryAdvanced Locality SearchRandom MineralRandom LocalitySearch by minIDLocalities Near MeSearch ArticlesSearch GlossaryMore Search Options
Search For:
Mineral Name:
Locality Name:
Keyword(s):
 
The Mindat ManualAdd a New PhotoRate PhotosLocality Edit ReportCoordinate Completion ReportAdd Glossary Item
Mining CompaniesStatisticsUsersMineral MuseumsMineral Shows & EventsThe Mindat DirectoryDevice Settings
Photo SearchPhoto GalleriesNew Photos TodayNew Photos YesterdayMembers' Photo GalleriesPast Photo of the Day GalleryMineral Photography

Jesenice meteorite, Jesenice, Upper Carniola Region, Sloveniai
Regional Level Types
Jesenice meteoriteMeteorite Fall Location
JeseniceMunicipality
Upper Carniola RegionStatistical Region
SloveniaCountry

This page is currently not sponsored. Click here to sponsor this page.
Key
Lock Map
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 46° 25' 17'' North , 14° 3' 8'' East
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 46.42139,14.05222
GeoHash:G#: u23bpfb80
Locality type:Meteorite Fall Location
Meteorite Class:L6 chondrite meteorite
Meteoritical Society Class:L6
Metbull:View entry in Meteoritical Bulletin Database
Köppen climate type:Cfb : Temperate oceanic climate
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Jesenice13,440 (2014)1.5km
Spodnje Gorje998 (2014)1.6km
Kočna218 (2014)2.5km
Slovenski Javornik2,002 (2014)2.7km
Lipce240 (2014)3.3km


Ordinary Chondrite (L6, S3, W0/1)
Fell, 9 April 2009; 3.67 kg, 3 stones

A bright fireball appeared over Carinthia and the Karavanke Mountains. The meteoroid entered the atmosphere at a steep angle and disintegrated into a large number of fragments after more than 4 s of flight with loud explosions heard in and around Jesenice. Automated fireball recorders and infrasound detectors apparently aided in the recovery of 3 fragments in the following weeks and months. The first stone (and largest [2.35 kg]) recovered was shattered at impact into numerous pieces. The 2nd and 3rd smaller stones (361g , 956 g, resp.) survived their falls almost intact. The combination of seismic, infrasound, photoelectric, and photographic data indicate that the incoming meteoroid was in a more or less typical Apollo asteroid orbit bringing it from the inner asteroid belt into the realm of the earth's orbit before its final impact.

The rock is fine-grained and shows brownish taints (weathering) on surfaces of the broken pieces. Shock veins were detected. In thin section Jesenice is highly recrystallized with relatively large plagioclase grains and a few relic chondrules are visible. These textures and its highly equilibrated olivine (Fa25) and Ca-poor pyroxene (Fs21) are all characteristic of type L6 chondrites. Undulatory extinction in olivine and plagioclase, planar fractures in olivine, and the shock veins are indicative of moderate pre-terrestrial shock. However, Jesenice is not a totally typical L6 chondrite. Jesenice is actually significantly less shocked than most L6 ordinary chondrites which have experienced even more extreme shock. Jesenice's K-40/Ar-40 gas retention age (~4.3 Ga) is much older than than those of most L6 chondrites. Furthermore, its cosmic ray exposure age (~5 Ma) does not conform with the large cluster of ~7 Ma exposure ages of many L6 chondrites. The suggestion is, of course, that while the Jesenice material may well have originated on the putative L chondrite original parent body (OPB), it may have spent some intervening eons on a different 'daughter' asteroid than other L-chondrites before becoming part of the small meteoroid which would eventually collide with the earth.

Jesenice is but one of 269 observed meteorite falls that are currently classified as exactly 'L6' ordinary chondrites. The L6 petrologic type is the largest subset of the L type (low bulk iron) ordinary chondrite geochemical group with 401 unambiguously assigned members which represent ~40% of all witnessed falls [as of 26 Dec 2015].

Regions containing this locality

Eurasian PlateTectonic Plate
EuropeContinent
The Alps, EuropeMountain Range

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


6 valid minerals.

Meteorite/Rock Types Recorded

Note: this is a very new system on mindat.org and data is currently VERY limited. Please bear with us while we work towards adding this information!

Select Rock List Type

Alphabetical List Tree Diagram

Detailed Mineral List:

'Albite-Anorthite Series'
Reference: Weisberg, M.K. & 8 others (2010). The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 97. Meteoritics & Planetary Science 45(3): 449-493. (March 2010).; Bischoff, A. & 11 others (2011)—Jesenice A new meteorite fall from Slovenia: Meteoritics & Planetary Science Science 46(6): 793-804. (June 2011).
'Apatite'
Reference: Bischoff, A. & 11 others (2011)—Jesenice A new meteorite fall from Slovenia: Meteoritics & Planetary Science Science 46(6): 793-804. (June 2011).
Chromite
Formula: Fe2+Cr3+2O4
Reference: Bischoff, A. & 11 others (2011)—Jesenice A new meteorite fall from Slovenia: Meteoritics & Planetary Science Science 46(6): 793-804. (June 2011).
'Fayalite-Forsterite Series'
Description: Mean composition of homogeneous olivine Fa25
Reference: Weisberg, M.K. & 8 others (2010). The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 97. Meteoritics & Planetary Science 45(3): 449-493. (March 2010).; Bischoff, A. & 11 others (2011)—Jesenice A new meteorite fall from Slovenia: Meteoritics & Planetary Science Science 46(6): 793-804. (June 2011).
Ilmenite
Formula: Fe2+TiO3
Reference: Bischoff, A. & 11 others (2011)—Jesenice A new meteorite fall from Slovenia: Meteoritics & Planetary Science Science 46(6): 793-804. (June 2011).
Iron
Formula: Fe
Reference: Bischoff, A. & 11 others (2011)—Jesenice A new meteorite fall from Slovenia: Meteoritics & Planetary Science Science 46(6): 793-804. (June 2011).
Iron var: Kamacite
Formula: (Fe,Ni)
Reference: Bischoff, A. & 11 others (2011)—Jesenice A new meteorite fall from Slovenia: Meteoritics & Planetary Science Science 46(6): 793-804. (June 2011).
Merrillite
Formula: Ca9NaMg(PO4)7
Reference: Bischoff, A. & 11 others (2011)—Jesenice A new meteorite fall from Slovenia: Meteoritics & Planetary Science Science 46(6): 793-804. (June 2011).
'Pyroxene Group'
Description: Both Ca-rich and Ca-poor pyroxene are present (presumably including, thus, at least one orthopyroxene and one clinopyroxene).
Reference: Weisberg, M.K. & 8 others (2010). The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 97. Meteoritics & Planetary Science 45(3): 449-493. (March 2010).; Bischoff, A. & 11 others (2011)—Jesenice A new meteorite fall from Slovenia: Meteoritics & Planetary Science Science 46(6): 793-804. (June 2011).
Taenite
Formula: (Fe,Ni)
Reference: Bischoff, A. & 11 others (2011)—Jesenice A new meteorite fall from Slovenia: Meteoritics & Planetary Science Science 46(6): 793-804. (June 2011).
Troilite
Formula: FeS
Reference: Bischoff, A. & 11 others (2011)—Jesenice A new meteorite fall from Slovenia: Meteoritics & Planetary Science Science 46(6): 793-804. (June 2011).

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 1 - Elements
Iron1.AE.05Fe
var: Kamacite1.AE.05(Fe,Ni)
Taenite1.AE.10(Fe,Ni)
Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Troilite2.CC.10FeS
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Chromite4.BB.05Fe2+Cr3+2O4
Ilmenite4.CB.05Fe2+TiO3
Group 8 - Phosphates, Arsenates and Vanadates
Merrillite8.AC.45Ca9NaMg(PO4)7
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Albite-Anorthite Series'-
'Apatite'-
'Fayalite-Forsterite Series'-
'Pyroxene Group'-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 1 - NATIVE ELEMENTS AND ALLOYS
Metals, other than the Platinum Group
Iron
var: Kamacite
1.1.11.1(Fe,Ni)
Taenite1.1.11.2(Fe,Ni)
Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Troilite2.8.9.1FeS
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
A2X3
Ilmenite4.3.5.1Fe2+TiO3
Group 7 - MULTIPLE OXIDES
AB2X4
Chromite7.2.3.3Fe2+Cr3+2O4
Group 38 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL PHOSPHATES, ARSENATES, AND VANADATES
(AB)3(XO4)2
Merrillite38.3.4.4Ca9NaMg(PO4)7
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
'Albite-Anorthite Series'-
'Apatite'-
'Fayalite-Forsterite Series'-
Iron-Fe
'Pyroxene Group'-

List of minerals for each chemical element

OOxygen
O ChromiteFe2+Cr23+O4
O IlmeniteFe2+TiO3
O MerrilliteCa9NaMg(PO4)7
NaSodium
Na MerrilliteCa9NaMg(PO4)7
MgMagnesium
Mg MerrilliteCa9NaMg(PO4)7
PPhosphorus
P MerrilliteCa9NaMg(PO4)7
SSulfur
S TroiliteFeS
CaCalcium
Ca MerrilliteCa9NaMg(PO4)7
TiTitanium
Ti IlmeniteFe2+TiO3
CrChromium
Cr ChromiteFe2+Cr23+O4
FeIron
Fe ChromiteFe2+Cr23+O4
Fe Iron (var: Kamacite)(Fe,Ni)
Fe IlmeniteFe2+TiO3
Fe Taenite(Fe,Ni)
Fe TroiliteFeS
Fe IronFe
NiNickel
Ni Iron (var: Kamacite)(Fe,Ni)
Ni Taenite(Fe,Ni)

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Cretaceous
66 - 145 Ma



ID: 3185977
Mesozoic sedimentary rocks

Age: Cretaceous (66 - 145 Ma)

Comments: Dinaric Alps

Lithology: Sedimentary rocks

Reference: Chorlton, L.B. Generalized geology of the world: bedrock domains and major faults in GIS format: a small-scale world geology map with an extended geological attribute database. doi: 10.4095/223767. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 5529. [154]

Late Triassic
201.3 - 237 Ma



ID: 3160996
Eastern Alps; Southern Alps; Internal and External Dinarides

Age: Late Triassic (201.3 - 237 Ma)

Lithology: Dolomite/dolostone

Reference: Asch, K. The 1:5M International Geological Map of Europe and Adjacent Areas: Development and Implementation of a GIS-enabled Concept. Geologisches Jahrbuch, SA 3. [147]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Weisberg, M.K. & 8 others (2010). The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 97. Meteoritics & Planetary Science 45(3): 449-493. (March 2010).
Spurný, P. & 7 others (2010) Analysis of instrumental observations of the Jesenice meteorite fall on April 9, 2009: Meteoritics and Planetary Science 45(8): 1392-1407. (August 2010).
Bischoff, A. & 11 others (2011)—Jesenice A new meteorite fall from Slovenia: Meteoritics & Planetary Science Science 46(6): 793-804. (June 2011).

External Links



This page contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.
 
Mineral and/or Locality  
Mindat.org is an outreach project of the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization. Public Relations by Blytheweigh.
Copyright © mindat.org and the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy 1993-2019, except where stated. Most political location boundaries are © OpenStreetMap contributors. Mindat.org relies on the contributions of thousands of members and supporters.
Privacy Policy - Terms & Conditions - Contact Us Current server date and time: October 14, 2019 05:40:56 Page generated: March 28, 2019 12:09:27
Go to top of page