SUPPORT US. If mindat.org is important to you, click here to donate to our Fall 2019 fundraiser!
Log InRegister
Home PageAbout MindatThe Mindat ManualHistory of MindatCopyright StatusWho We AreContact UsAdvertise on Mindat
Donate to MindatCorporate SponsorshipSponsor a PageSponsored PagesMindat AdvertisersAdvertise on Mindat
Learning CenterWhat is a mineral?The most common minerals on earthInformation for EducatorsMindat ArticlesThe ElementsBooks & Magazines
Minerals by PropertiesMinerals by ChemistryAdvanced Locality SearchRandom MineralRandom LocalitySearch by minIDLocalities Near MeSearch ArticlesSearch GlossaryMore Search Options
Search For:
Mineral Name:
Locality Name:
Keyword(s):
 
The Mindat ManualAdd a New PhotoRate PhotosLocality Edit ReportCoordinate Completion ReportAdd Glossary Item
Mining CompaniesStatisticsUsersMineral MuseumsMineral Shows & EventsThe Mindat DirectoryDevice Settings
Photo SearchPhoto GalleriesNew Photos TodayNew Photos YesterdayMembers' Photo GalleriesPast Photo of the Day GalleryMineral Photography

Chico Hills meteorite, Colfax Co., New Mexico, USAi
Regional Level Types
Chico Hills meteoriteMeteorite Fall Location
Colfax Co.County
New MexicoState
USACountry

This page is currently not sponsored. Click here to sponsor this page.
Key
Lock Map
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 36° 31' 54'' North , 104° 10' 3'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 36.53167,-104.16750
GeoHash:G#: 9wmzvd7s3
Locality type:Meteorite Fall Location
Meteorite Class:H4 chondrite meteorite
Meteoritical Society Class:H4
Metbull:View entry in Meteoritical Bulletin Database
Köppen climate type:BSk : Cold semi-arid (steppe) climate
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Maxwell228 (2017)33.6km
Des Moines129 (2017)39.2km
Springer943 (2017)42.7km
Raton6,187 (2017)47.9km


Ordinary chondrite, (H4; S4; W1)
Found, 1951; 8.03 kg

About 30 stones were recovered from a region centered in Colfax County. The Chico Hills meteorite is distinguished by distinct and quite large chondrules with an ave. diameter of ~1 cm. Smaller aggregates of Fe-Ni metal and sulfides are plentiful and frequently rim the chondrules. Olivine (Fa~19) and low-Ca orthopyroxene are compositionally dominant. The meteorite has experienced moderately strong shock — most readily observed in mosaicism and planar fractures in olivine (shock level S4). Somewhat surprisingly for such a strongly shocked petrologic type 4 chondrite the only reported low-Ca pyroxene in the cited sources is orthopyroxene. (Minor or even dominant clinopyroxene is often found in type 4 ordinary chondrites while twinned clinopyroxene is frequently found in highly shocked ordinary chondrites.)

The H (relatively high in total iron) chondrites are the second largest group of ordinary chondrites and represent ~40% of classified witnessed falls with type H4 chondrites representing almost 20 % of the H chondrites. The main mass has been kept at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque.

What's in a name? Both the 'Chico meteorite' (an L6 chondrite) and the 'Chico Hills meteorite' were found in Colfax County, New Mexico, USA. However, the 'Chico Mountains meteorite' is an iron meteorite found in Texas several decades earlier (1915).

Coordinates are for the center of the Chico Hills.

Regions containing this locality

North America PlateTectonic Plate

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


Meteorite/Rock Types Recorded

Note: this is a very new system on mindat.org and data is currently VERY limited. Please bear with us while we work towards adding this information!

Select Rock List Type

Alphabetical List Tree Diagram

Detailed Mineral List:

'Fayalite-Forsterite Series'
Reference: Mason, B. (1967) Olivine composition in chondrites—a supplement: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 31(6):1100-1103. (June 1967).; Lange, D.E. & Keil, K. (1976) Notes on the Chondrites from Northeastern New Mexico: Meteoritics 11(4): 315-316. (Dec 1976).; Grady, M.M., Pratesi, G. & Moggi-Cecchi, V. (2015) Atlas of Meteorites. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, United Kingdom. 373 pages.
'Meteoritic Iron'
Reference: Grady, M.M., Pratesi, G. & Moggi-Cecchi, V. (2015) Atlas of Meteorites. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, United Kingdom. 373 pages.
'Orthopyroxene Subgroup'
Reference: Grady, M.M., Pratesi, G. & Moggi-Cecchi, V. (2015) Atlas of Meteorites. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, United Kingdom. 373 pages.

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Fayalite-Forsterite Series'-
'Meteoritic Iron'-
'Orthopyroxene Subgroup'-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
'Fayalite-Forsterite Series'-
'Meteoritic Iron'-
'Orthopyroxene Subgroup'-

List of minerals for each chemical element

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Pliocene - Eocene
2.588 - 56 Ma



ID: 2848518
Tertiary intrusive rocks of intermediate to silicic composition

Age: Cenozoic (2.588 - 56 Ma)

Description: Includes monzonitic to granitic plutons, stocks, laccoliths, and porphyritic dikes in deeply eroded magmatic centers; and andesitic, dacitic, or rhyolitic plugs and dikes near cauldrons or stratovolcanoes. In the Latir field, fine-grained rhyolitic dikes commonly cut coarse-grained granitic plutons. Includes alkaline laccoliths, plugs, and dikes in Colfax County. North-trending dikes near Capitan include some mafic diabase dikes.

Comments: Original map source: Green, G.N., Jones, G.E., and Anderson, O.J., 1997, The Digital Geologic Map of New Mexico in ARC/INFO Format: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 97-0052, 9 p., scale 1:500,000.

Lithology: Major:{granitic,syenitic}, Minor:{felsic hypabyssal,mafic hypabyssal}

Reference: Horton, J.D., C.A. San Juan, and D.B. Stoeser. The State Geologic Map Compilation (SGMC) geodatabase of the conterminous United States. doi: 10.3133/ds1052. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1052. [133]

Pliocene
2.588 - 5.333 Ma



ID: 3188244
Cenozoic sedimentary rocks

Age: Pliocene (2.588 - 5.333 Ma)

Lithology: Sedimentary rocks

Reference: Chorlton, L.B. Generalized geology of the world: bedrock domains and major faults in GIS format: a small-scale world geology map with an extended geological attribute database. doi: 10.4095/223767. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 5529. [154]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Mason, B. (1967) Olivine composition in chondrites—a supplement: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 31(6):1100-1103. (June 1967).
Lange, D.E. & Keil, K. (1976) Notes on the Chondrites from Northeastern New Mexico: Meteoritics 11(4): 315-316. (Dec 1976).
Lange, D.E. & Keil, K. (1976) Meteorites of Northeastern New Mexico. New Mexico Geol. Soc. Guidebook, 27th Field Conf., Vermejo Park.
Grady, M.M., Pratesi, G. & Moggi-Cecchi, V. (2015) Atlas of Meteorites. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, United Kingdom. 373 pages.

External Links



This page contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.
 
Mineral and/or Locality  
Mindat.org is an outreach project of the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization. Public Relations by Blytheweigh.
Copyright © mindat.org and the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy 1993-2019, except where stated. Most political location boundaries are © OpenStreetMap contributors. Mindat.org relies on the contributions of thousands of members and supporters.
Privacy Policy - Terms & Conditions - Contact Us Current server date and time: November 12, 2019 22:16:10 Page generated: April 8, 2019 12:04:03
Go to top of page