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Pizzo Marcio South-East dyke, Pizzo Marcio, Trontano, Vigezzo Valley, Ossola Valley, Verbano-Cusio-Ossola Province, Piedmont, Italy

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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 46° 6' 7'' North , 8° 23' 44'' East
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 46.10222,8.39556
Other regions containing this locality:The Alps, Europe
Köppen climate type:Dfc : Subarctic climate
Name(s) in local language(s):Filone del Pizzo Marcio sud-est, Pizzo Marcio, Trontano, Val Vigezzo, Val d'Ossola, Provincia del Verbano-Cusio-Ossola, Piemonte, Italia


Albitised pegmatite dyke outcropping along the bed of a streamlet, flowing in a gully located on the south-east slope of Pizzo Marcio in Antoliva Valley, just above the path connecting Alpe Miucca to Passo Biordo.

The dyke, which outcrops for about 30 metres at an elevation of ca. 1650 m a.s.l., is not always easy to work because of the flowing water. One of the most typical minerals from this occurrence is roggianite, which forms tufts of fine acicular crystals, silky white with a slightly rose tinge, sometimes in association with microcline, clinozoisite, and granular quartz.

Furthermore, typical peculiarities are observable in the host rocks:
- bavenite can be found, completely dissociated from beryl, in a rodingite at the contact with the albitised pegmatite. Here, it appears as millimetre-sized felted aggregates embedded in prehnite or as fan-like aggregates of slender lamellar crystals in association with clinozoisite, diopside (crystals up to 15 mm long), prehnite, titanite, etc.
- a quartz lens, situated three metres from the albitised pegmatite dyke, is cut by a 10-15 cm thick vein of black schorl, in which idiomorphic crystals of the same mineral, attaining several centimetres in length, sometimes occur (Mattioli et al., 1995).


Mineral List


31 valid minerals.

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Jurassic
145 - 201.3 Ma



ID: 2360699
Metamorphe Gesteine, meist Metamagmatite

Age: Jurassic (145 - 201.3 Ma)

Lithology: Serpentinite, talc schist

Reference: Geological Institute. Geological Map of Switzerland 1:500,000. isbn: 3906723399. University of Bern. [49]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License



This page contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.

References

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Appiani, R., Cini, V., Gentile, P., Mattioli, V., Preite, D., Vignola, P. (1995): Val Vigezzo - I minerali delle albititi. Ed. Linea Due S.r.l., Marnate (Varese), 90 pp.
Piccoli, G.C., Maletto, G., Bosio, P., Lombardo, B. (2007): Minerali del Piemonte e della Valle d'Aosta. Associazione Amici del Museo "F. Eusebio" di Alba, Ed., Alba, 607 pp.
Guastoni, A. (2011): Pizzo Marcio e Alpe Rosso. Genesi delle pegmatiti albitizzate e dei minerali di niobio e tantalio. Riv. Miner. Ital., 35, 4 (4-2011), 246-253.
Guastoni, A. (2012): LCT (lithium, cesium, tantalum) and NYF (niobium, yttrium, fluorine) pegmatites in the Central Alps. Proxies of exhumation history of the Alpine nappe stack in the Lepontine Dome. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Padova, Dept. of Geosciences, 159 pp.
Boscardin, M., Mattioli, V., Rocchetti, I. (2013): Minerali della Valle Vigezzo. Litotipografia Alcione, Lavis (Trento), 229 pp.

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