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Boling Dome (Boling oil field; Newgulf Sulfur Operations), Newgulf, Wharton Co., Texas, USAi
Regional Level Types
Boling Dome (Boling oil field; Newgulf Sulfur Operations)Dome
Newgulf- not defined -
Wharton Co.County
TexasState
USACountry

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Key
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
29° 16' 55'' North , 95° 53' 0'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Locality type:
Köppen climate type:
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Boling1,122 (2011)6.2km
Iago161 (2011)7.8km
Needville3,063 (2017)13.8km
Damon552 (2011)14.5km
Fairchilds1,027 (2017)19.4km


A salt-S-limestone-gypsum/anhydrite-baryte-Fe-Zn-Pb-Mn deposit located 5.2 km (3.2 miles) NNE of Newgulf, on private land (private lease). Discovered in 1923 by Gulf Production Company based on a geophysical anomaly. Operated by Union Sulfur Company during the period 1929 to 1940. Owned by the Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan (100%), Canada (1996). Owned & operated by Texasgulf Incorporated (Subsidiary of Elf Aquitaine, Incorporated) (100%), Connecticut (1982 to 1995). First production occurred in 1929. MRDS database stated accuracy for this location is 100 meters. H2S seeps were noted in 1922. Sulfur was found in 1923 oil test. The deposit was delineated by drilling in 1927. Salt mined by Texas Gulf was used to recondition water softeners in power plants. The mine was permanently closed in December, 1993. It was removed from adit in January, 1995.

Mineralization is a salt dome deposit (Mineral occurrence model information: Model code: 255; USGS model code: 35a.7 (35ag); Deposit model name: Salt-dome sulfur), hosted in the Middle Jurassic Louann limestone and salt. The ore body is 30 meters thick with a width of 8,000 meters, length of 4,800 meters and a depth-to-top of 275 meters. Alternate ore body dimensions are presented at a thickness of 60.96 meters, depth-to-bottom of 335.28 meters and a depth-to-top of 274.32 meters. The depth to caprock is 383 feet, to sulfur 900 feet, and to the salt 975 feet. The salt volume was calculated at 31.3 cubic miles to 10,000 feet of depth. The sulfur deposit is up to 200 feet thick with up to 50% S and covers an area of 1,725 acres in the SE third of the dome. Ore body No. 1 is sedimentary and tabular. Ore body No. 2 is disseminated,lenticular. Controls for ore emplacement included fractures in limestone caprock. The primary mode of origin was evaporation and the secondary mode was sedimentation. There is no wallrock alteration. The minimum depth to top is 122 (what ?). The sulfur occurs in evaporites and limestone on the top and flanks of a salt dome. The sulfur was probably formed by hydrocarbon reduction of anhydrite assisted by bacterial actions. The measurements given under average dimensions of mineralization are for an ellipse. Local alteration included biogenic alteration of anhydrock to limestone. Local rocks include alluvium.

Workings included the wells and surface infrastructure to mine sulfur by the Frasch process and mine salt by a solution process. The sulfur was mined by the Frasch mining method that used superheated hot water, steam and compressed air for melting and recovering sulfur in a liquid form from deep wells. The plant used 30.28 million liters of water per day. The facility is currently working as a cogeneration plant producing 150,000 short tons (136,000 metric tons per year (of what ??).

Production data are found in: Samuelson, F.S. (1992).

Production statistics: Year: 1968 (period = 1929 to Jan 1, 1968): 64,201,000 metric tons sulfur.
1968: 1,393,000 metric tons
1969: 1,271,000 metric tons
1970: 1,098,000 metric tons
1971: 1,098,000 metric tons
1972: 1,091,000 metric tons
1973: 1,094,000 metric tons
1974: 1,033,000 metric tons
1975: 1,027,000 metric tons
1976: 1,109,000 metric tons
1977: 917,000 metric tons
1978: 860,000 metric tons
1979: 1,062,000 metric tons
1980: 1,040,000 metric tons
1981: 913,000 metric tons
1982: 604,184 metric tons
1983: 395,633 metric tons
1984: 414,356 metric tons
1985: 373,301 metric tons
1986: 359,805 metric tons
Average recovery through 10/1991 was 3,528 long tons per day of sulfur.

Analytical data results 5 to 15% (by volume) anhydrite in salt.

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Commodity List

This is a list of exploitable or exploited mineral commodities recorded at this locality.


Mineral List


16 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Alabandite
Formula: MnS
Reference: R&M 66:3 pp 196-224
Anhydrite
Formula: CaSO4
Reference: R&M 66:3 pp 196-224; U.S. Geological Survey,2005,Mineral Resources Data System :U.S. Geological Survey,Reston, Virginia
Aragonite
Formula: CaCO3
Reference: R&M 66:3 pp 196-224
Baryte
Formula: BaSO4
Reference: Min News 1:4 pp1-2; U.S. Geological Survey,2005,Mineral Resources Data System :U.S. Geological Survey,Reston, Virginia
Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Reference: Economic Geology; April 1979; v. 74; no. 2; p. 462-468; U.S. Geological Survey,2005,Mineral Resources Data System :U.S. Geological Survey,Reston, Virginia
Celestine
Formula: SrSO4
Reference: R&M 66:3 pp 196-224; U.S. Geological Survey,2005,Mineral Resources Data System :U.S. Geological Survey,Reston, Virginia
Galena
Formula: PbS
Reference: R&M 66:3 pp 196-224
Gypsum
Formula: CaSO4 · 2H2O
Reference: R&M 66:3 pp 196-224; U.S. Geological Survey,2005,Mineral Resources Data System :U.S. Geological Survey,Reston, Virginia
Gypsum var: Alabaster
Formula: CaSO4 · 2H2O
Reference: U.S. Geological Survey,2005,Mineral Resources Data System :U.S. Geological Survey,Reston, Virginia
Gypsum var: Selenite
Formula: CaSO4 · 2H2O
Reference: U.S. Geological Survey,2005,Mineral Resources Data System :U.S. Geological Survey,Reston, Virginia
Halite
Formula: NaCl
Reference: R&M 66:3 pp 196-224; U.S. Geological Survey,2005,Mineral Resources Data System :U.S. Geological Survey,Reston, Virginia
Hauerite
Formula: MnS2
Reference: Handbook of Mineralogy - Anthony, Bideaux, Bladh, Nichols
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Reference: R&M 66:3 pp 196-224
Pyrrhotite
Formula: Fe7S8
Reference: R&M 66:3 pp 196-224
Smithsonite
Formula: ZnCO3
Reference: R&M 73:4 p287-290
Sphalerite
Formula: ZnS
Reference: R&M 66:3 pp 196-224
Strontianite
Formula: SrCO3
Reference: R&M 66:3 pp 196-224
Sulphur
Formula: S8
Reference: Economic Geology; April 1979; v. 74; no. 2; p. 462-468; U.S. Geological Survey,2005,Mineral Resources Data System :U.S. Geological Survey,Reston, Virginia

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 1 - Elements
Sulphur1.CC.05S8
Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Alabandite2.CD.10MnS
Galena2.CD.10PbS
Hauerite2.EB.05aMnS2
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Pyrrhotite2.CC.10Fe7S8
Sphalerite2.CB.05aZnS
Group 3 - Halides
Halite3.AA.20NaCl
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Aragonite5.AB.15CaCO3
Calcite5.AB.05CaCO3
Smithsonite5.AB.05ZnCO3
Strontianite5.AB.15SrCO3
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
Anhydrite7.AD.30CaSO4
Baryte7.AD.35BaSO4
Celestine7.AD.35SrSO4
Gypsum7.CD.40CaSO4 · 2H2O
var: Alabaster7.CD.40CaSO4 · 2H2O
var: Selenite7.CD.40CaSO4 · 2H2O

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 1 - NATIVE ELEMENTS AND ALLOYS
Semi-metals and non-metals
Sulphur1.3.5.1S8
Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Alabandite2.8.1.4MnS
Galena2.8.1.1PbS
Pyrrhotite2.8.10.1Fe7S8
Sphalerite2.8.2.1ZnS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Hauerite2.12.1.9MnS2
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 9 - NORMAL HALIDES
AX
Halite9.1.1.1NaCl
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
Smithsonite14.1.1.6ZnCO3
Strontianite14.1.3.3SrCO3
Group 28 - ANHYDROUS ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4
Anhydrite28.3.2.1CaSO4
Baryte28.3.1.1BaSO4
Celestine28.3.1.2SrSO4
Group 29 - HYDRATED ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4·xH2O
Gypsum29.6.3.1CaSO4 · 2H2O
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
Aragonite-CaCO3
Gypsum
var: Alabaster
-CaSO4 · 2H2O
var: Selenite-CaSO4 · 2H2O

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
H Gypsum (var: Alabaster)CaSO4 · 2H2O
H Gypsum (var: Selenite)CaSO4 · 2H2O
CCarbon
C CalciteCaCO3
C AragoniteCaCO3
C StrontianiteSrCO3
C SmithsoniteZnCO3
OOxygen
O CalciteCaCO3
O AnhydriteCaSO4
O AragoniteCaCO3
O CelestineSrSO4
O GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
O StrontianiteSrCO3
O BaryteBaSO4
O SmithsoniteZnCO3
O Gypsum (var: Alabaster)CaSO4 · 2H2O
O Gypsum (var: Selenite)CaSO4 · 2H2O
NaSodium
Na HaliteNaCl
SSulfur
S HaueriteMnS2
S SulphurS8
S AlabanditeMnS
S AnhydriteCaSO4
S CelestineSrSO4
S GalenaPbS
S GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
S PyriteFeS2
S PyrrhotiteFe7S8
S SphaleriteZnS
S BaryteBaSO4
S Gypsum (var: Alabaster)CaSO4 · 2H2O
S Gypsum (var: Selenite)CaSO4 · 2H2O
ClChlorine
Cl HaliteNaCl
CaCalcium
Ca CalciteCaCO3
Ca AnhydriteCaSO4
Ca AragoniteCaCO3
Ca GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
Ca Gypsum (var: Alabaster)CaSO4 · 2H2O
Ca Gypsum (var: Selenite)CaSO4 · 2H2O
MnManganese
Mn HaueriteMnS2
Mn AlabanditeMnS
FeIron
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe PyrrhotiteFe7S8
ZnZinc
Zn SphaleriteZnS
Zn SmithsoniteZnCO3
SrStrontium
Sr CelestineSrSO4
Sr StrontianiteSrCO3
BaBarium
Ba BaryteBaSO4
PbLead
Pb GalenaPbS

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Wolf, A.G. (1933), The Boling Dome, Texas, in Oklahoma and Texas, Guidebook 6, International Geologic Congress, 16th Session, United States: 86-91.
Haynes, W. (1942), The Stone that Burns. Van Nostrand, New York, 344 pp.
Espenshade, G.H. and Broedel, C.H. (1952), Annotated Bibliography and Index Map of Sulphur and Pyrite Deposits in the United States and Alaska, USGS Information Circular 157, 48pp.
Texas Gulf Sulphur Company (1952), New York, NY, 24 pp.
Netzeband, F.F., Early, T.R., Ryan J.P. and Miller, W.C. (1964), Sulphur Resources and Production in Texas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Kansas and Mississippi, and Markets for the Sulphur, U.S. Bureau of mines Information Circular IC 8222, 77pp.
Hawkins, M. E. and C. J. Jirik (1966), Salt domes in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and offshore tidelands: a survey, U.S. Bureau of Mines Information Circular 8313.
Ellison, Jr. (1971), Sulphur in Texas, Bureau of Economic Geology, Handbook No. 2, January, 1971, 48 pp.
McGowen, J.H. et al. (1976), Environmental Geologic Atlas of the Texas Gulf Coastal Zone - Bay City-Freeport Area, University of Texas, Austin, Bureau of Economic Geology, 98 pp., 9 maps.
Economic Geology (1979): 74(2) (April): 462-468.
Samuelson, F.S. (1992), Anatomy of an Elephant; Boling Dome, in Wessel, G.R., and Wimbery, B.U., editors, Native Sulfur - Developments in Geology and Exploration, Littleton, Colorado, SME: 59-71.
Mining Engineering (1995), (May, 1995): 407.
USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10061153 & 10208257.
U.S. Bureau of Mines, Minerals Availability System (MAS) file ID # 0484810001.

USGS MRDS Record:10061153

Other Regions, Features and Areas containg this locality

North America PlateTectonic Plate

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