SUPPORT US. If mindat.org is important to you, click here to donate to our Fall 2019 fundraiser!
Log InRegister
Home PageAbout MindatThe Mindat ManualHistory of MindatCopyright StatusWho We AreContact UsAdvertise on Mindat
Donate to MindatCorporate SponsorshipSponsor a PageSponsored PagesMindat AdvertisersAdvertise on Mindat
Learning CenterWhat is a mineral?The most common minerals on earthInformation for EducatorsMindat ArticlesThe ElementsBooks & Magazines
Minerals by PropertiesMinerals by ChemistryAdvanced Locality SearchRandom MineralRandom LocalitySearch by minIDLocalities Near MeSearch ArticlesSearch GlossaryMore Search Options
Search For:
Mineral Name:
Locality Name:
Keyword(s):
 
The Mindat ManualAdd a New PhotoRate PhotosLocality Edit ReportCoordinate Completion ReportAdd Glossary Item
Mining CompaniesStatisticsUsersMineral MuseumsMineral Shows & EventsThe Mindat DirectoryDevice Settings
Photo SearchPhoto GalleriesNew Photos TodayNew Photos YesterdayMembers' Photo GalleriesPast Photo of the Day GalleryMineral Photography

Emilio Mine, Loroñe, Obdulia vein, Colunga District, Caravia mining area, Asturias, Spaini
Regional Level Types
Emilio MineMine
LoroñeVillage
Obdulia veinVein
Colunga DistrictMining District
Caravia mining areaArea
AsturiasAutonomous Community
SpainCountry

This page is currently not sponsored. Click here to sponsor this page.
Key
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
43° 27' 28'' North , 5° 13' 22'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Locality type:
Köppen climate type:
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Caravia557 (2008)2.5km
Colunga3,868 (2012)4.9km
Ribadesella6,245 (2012)13.2km
Parres5,749 (2012)13.3km
Cangas de Onís6,623 (2012)14.0km
Name(s) in local language(s):
Mina Emilio, Loroñe, Filón Obdulia, Colunga, Zona minera de Caravia, Asturias, España


Although the pithead and part of the mining works of Emilio Mine are located in Colunga, the main works are in Caravia and it belongs to the last locality concerning its mineralization (it is further north mine of the group that comprises Jaimina, Valnegro, Eduardo...). For this reason it is included in Caravia mining area.

This mining concession was demarcated in 1940 at the Mine Office in Oviedo by Francisco Llera Bárcena, inhabitant of Colunga, for the extraction of kaolin. It then seems that, after some obscure political pressure, the rights were transferred to another owner who conducted research during 1947 that led to the opening of a 42m deep shaft. From this shaft they extracted mineral with limited technical resources until 1950. In 1965, after the renovation of the shaft, research confirmed the existence of a 500m long mineralized vein, in a NW-SE orientation, with an average width of 1.5 m. At about that time Minera Togar (Tomás Garcés de los Fayos) acquired the operation and the benefits from it, selling the unprocessed mineral to companies such as Fluoruros or Minersa, for its concentration, or directly as a metallurgical product to several Asturian and Basque foundries. By 1982, with the decline of Togar mining company and its progressive economic dependence on Minersa more evident, this latter company leased the operation and planned a wide investigation campaign that revealed the existence of large reserves of fluorite in the deposit. With the experience accumulated in mines such as the Cucona or Moscona, the company established an extraction system using underground mining through chambers and pillars. All this development finished with the purchase of every asset and the concessions of Minera Togar by Minersa. The mining works were then restarted in 1985, with Minersa locating at the mouth of the mine a crushing and ore pre-concentration plant where the ore was prepared before being transferred to the flotation plant that the company also owned in Torre. Since 1985 about 4 million tons of mineral have been extracted and the galleries made reach more than 60km in length. As a curiosity the change of the extraction from kaolin to fluor spar was finally made by Minersa in 1989.

Regarding mineralogical features this mine is well known internationally. Since the beginning of the 1980’s it has been providing outstanding specimens of fluorite whose crystals have colors varying from colorless to deep violet. This fluorite is frequently associated with calcite, baryte and quartz. They also display a special characteristic, a true hallmark of the specimens coming from Emilio Mine: the great variety of the habits and combinations of the isometric system that occur in the mineral crystals. This varied crystallography is also typical of the whole Caravia mining area, although in Emilio Mine shows the widest range of possibilities. Another distinctive feature of this locality is the existence of sulfides inclusions (cinnabar, sphalerite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, etc.) inside the fluorite crystals, and it is also common to find organic inclusions (hydrocarbons) and even solid carbon remains. Over the the last years, from 2005 to 2009, while crossing the region known as intermediate zone, many pockets were found, some of them large, with double terminated big quartz crystals (up to 20 cm.), frequently associated with calcite, fluorite and pyrite, with good transparency and luster, often displaying window shape growths on their faces.

Regions containing this locality

Eurasian PlateTectonic Plate
EuropeContinent
Iberian PeninsulaPeninsula

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


10 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Baryte
Formula: BaSO4
Reference: Fluorite: The Collector's Choice. Extra Lapis English No. 9; Calvo, M. (2006): Minerales y Minas de España. Vol. III, Halogenuros. Museo de Ciencias Naturales de Álava, 267 pp.
Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Reference: Min Rec 36:3 p293; Calvo, M. (2006): Minerales y Minas de España. Vol. III, Halogenuros. Museo de Ciencias Naturales de Álava, 267 pp.
Chalcopyrite
Formula: CuFeS2
Reference: Fluorite: The Collector's Choice. Extra Lapis English No. 9; Calvo, M. (2006): Minerales y Minas de España. Vol. III, Halogenuros. Museo de Ciencias Naturales de Álava, 267 pp.
Cinnabar
Formula: HgS
Reference: Fluorite: The Collector's Choice. Extra Lapis English No. 9; Calvo, M. (2006): Minerales y Minas de España. Vol. III, Halogenuros. Museo de Ciencias Naturales de Álava, 267 pp.
Dolomite
Formula: CaMg(CO3)2
Reference: Fluorite: The Collector's Choice. Extra Lapis English No. 9; Manuel Gutierrez Claverol, Carlos Luque Cabal, Jose Ramon Garcia Alvarez and Luis Miguel Rodriguez Terente (2009) La Fluorita - un siglo de mineria en Asturias. p270.
Fluorite
Formula: CaF2
Description: Large colorless, bright and waterclear crystals, with the cube as the dominant figure and complex modifications in vertices and edges. The presence of inclusions of sulphide microcrystals is frequent
Reference: Calvo, M. (2006): Minerales y Minas de España. Vol. III, Halogenuros. Museo de Ciencias Naturales de Álava, 267 pp. ; Fluorite: The Collector's Choice. Extra Lapis English No. 9
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Reference: Manuel Gutierrez Claverol, Carlos Luque Cabal, Jose Ramon Garcia Alvarez and Luis Miguel Rodriguez Terente (2009) La Fluorita - un siglo de mineria en Asturias. p270.
'Pyrobitumen'
Reference: Josep Sanchez Lafuente i Mariol (INTAN) specimens
Pyrolusite
Formula: Mn4+O2
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Reference: Calvo, M. (2016). Minerales y Minas de España. Vol. VIII. Cuarzo y otros minerales de la sílice. Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros de Minas de Madrid. Fundación Gómez Pardo. 399 págs.
Quartz var: "Herkimer-style" Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Reference: Calvo, M. (2016). Minerales y Minas de España. Vol VIII.Cuarzo y otros minerales de la sílice. Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros de Minas de Madrid. Fundación Gómez Pardo. 399 págs
Sphalerite
Formula: ZnS
Reference: Calvo, G. y Calvo, M. (2006). Fluorite from Spain. Every color under the Sun. En: Fluorite. The Collector's Choice. Lithographie LLC. Connecticut, USA. 38-42.Manuel Gutierrez Claverol, Carlos Luque Cabal, Jose Ramon Garcia Alvarez and Luis Miguel Rodriguez Terente (2009) La Fluorita - un siglo de mineria en Asturias. p270.

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Chalcopyrite2.CB.10aCuFeS2
Cinnabar2.CD.15aHgS
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Sphalerite2.CB.05aZnS
Group 3 - Halides
Fluorite3.AB.25CaF2
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Pyrolusite4.DB.05Mn4+O2
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
var: "Herkimer-style" Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Calcite5.AB.05CaCO3
Dolomite5.AB.10CaMg(CO3)2
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
Baryte7.AD.35BaSO4
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Pyrobitumen'-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Cinnabar2.8.14.1HgS
Sphalerite2.8.2.1ZnS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:1
Chalcopyrite2.9.1.1CuFeS2
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
AX2
Pyrolusite4.4.1.4Mn4+O2
Group 9 - NORMAL HALIDES
AX2
Fluorite9.2.1.1CaF2
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
AB(XO3)2
Dolomite14.2.1.1CaMg(CO3)2
Group 28 - ANHYDROUS ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4
Baryte28.3.1.1BaSO4
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
'Pyrobitumen'-
Quartz
var: "Herkimer-style" Quartz
-SiO2

List of minerals for each chemical element

CCarbon
C CalciteCaCO3
C DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
OOxygen
O CalciteCaCO3
O BaryteBaSO4
O QuartzSiO2
O PyrolusiteMn4+O2
O DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
O Quartz (var: "Herkimer-style" Quartz)SiO2
FFluorine
F FluoriteCaF2
MgMagnesium
Mg DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
SiSilicon
Si QuartzSiO2
Si Quartz (var: "Herkimer-style" Quartz)SiO2
SSulfur
S BaryteBaSO4
S CinnabarHgS
S ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
S SphaleriteZnS
S PyriteFeS2
CaCalcium
Ca FluoriteCaF2
Ca CalciteCaCO3
Ca DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
MnManganese
Mn PyrolusiteMn4+O2
FeIron
Fe ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Fe PyriteFeS2
CuCopper
Cu ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
ZnZinc
Zn SphaleriteZnS
BaBarium
Ba BaryteBaSO4
HgMercury
Hg CinnabarHgS

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
García García, G. y Calvo, M. (1998). Mineralogía de los yacimientos de fluorita asturiana. Bocamina, (3), 34-59.
Calvo, M. (2006): Minerales y Minas de España. Vol. III, Halogenuros. Museo de Ciencias Naturales de Álava, 267 pp.
Calvo, G. y Calvo, M. (2006). Fluorite from Spain. Every color under the Sun. En: Fluorite. The Collector's Choice. Lithographie LLC. Connecticut, USA. 38-42.
Gutiérrez, M., Luque, C., García, J.R. y Rodríguez, L.M. (2009). La Fluorita. Un Siglo de Minería de Asturias. Universidad de Oviedo.565 pp.


This page contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.
 
Mineral and/or Locality  
Mindat.org is an outreach project of the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization. Public Relations by Blytheweigh.
Copyright © mindat.org and the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy 1993-2019, except where stated. Most political location boundaries are © OpenStreetMap contributors. Mindat.org relies on the contributions of thousands of members and supporters.
Privacy Policy - Terms & Conditions - Contact Us Current server date and time: August 25, 2019 12:18:04 Page generated: August 11, 2019 08:37:40
Go to top of page