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Sierrita Mts, Pima Co., Arizona, USA

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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 31° 52' 40'' North , 111° 11' 40'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 31.8777777778, -111.194444444
Other regions containing this locality:Sonoran Desert, North America


Ref.: Wilson, E.D., et al (1950), Arizona zinc and lead deposits, part I, Arizona Bureau of Mines Bull. 156: 42-43.

MRDS database Dep. ID file #10161696, MAS ID #0040190558.

The structure of the Sierrita Mountains has been complicated by folds overturns, low-angle faults, and steeply dipping falts. Much of it remains obscure and unknown. Some of the structures localized emplacement of the igneous intrusions and deposition of the ores. Some post-ore faulting has taken place.

In Mineral Hill faulted Paleozoic beds dip steeply southwestward, with older beds above younger. This block may be interpreted as one limb of a southeastward-trending, overturned fold, or it may be a remnant of a thrust-fault slice.

Helmet Peak consists of Snyder Hill limestone, bounded on the NE by down-faulted red beds and on the SW by shaly and arkosic beds of uncertain structural relation. Galbraith reports that the imestone of the peak shows a closely compressed anticline plunging southeastward.

Flexures are evident in the hill west of the San Xavier Extension Mine. Some unrecognized large folds may be present, as suggested by the wide variation in dips of beds in the Twin Buttes area.

As interpreted by Mayuga, the sedimentary rocks in the Mineral Hill, San Xavier, and Olive Camp areas rest upon the intrusive granite. Fault planes and breccia exposed above the granite indicate the contact to be a low-angle fault zone of general eastward dip. his fault zone may have localized the granite intrusion, or movement may have occurred along it after the intrusion.

A the San Xavier Extension Mine, Naco Limestone has been faulted over Escabrosa, and the fault contact dips about 25º southeastward. In the Cretaceous area south of the San Xavier Mine, older beds have been thrustover younger beds. In the northern part of Mineral Hill, a block of Escabrosa and Martin limestones has been thrust over Permian and Naco beds. The thrust plane appears to dip NE about 40º.

Steeply dipping fissures are numerous in the district. On the basis of general strike, they may be grouped into NE, NW, and east systems. Some of them have effected displacements of several hundred feet. Faults and fractures of the NE and east systems appear to be most commonly associated with mineralization.

Silver-lead deposits in the San Xavier and other districts of these mountains were known to the Jesuit missionaries and early Spaniards.

Mineral List

Mineral list contains entries from the region specified including sub-localities

Acanthite

Actinolite

Aegirine

'Albite-Anorthite Series'

Allanite-(Ce)

Alunite

Andradite

Anglesite

Anhydrite

Ankerite

Anorthite

Antigorite

'Apatite'

'Apophyllite'

Aragonite

'Asbestos'

Atacamite

Aurichalcite

Azurite

Baryte

Bassanite

Beryl

'Biotite'

Bismuth

Bornite

var: Argentiferous Bornite

Brochantite

Calcite

Caledonite

Cerussite

Chalcanthite

Chalcocite

var: Argentiferous Chalcocite

Chalcopyrite

Chlorargyrite

'Chlorite Group'

Chrysocolla

'Clays'

Clinochlore

Connellite

Copiapite

Copper

'Copper Stain'

Coquimbite

Covellite

Cubanite

Cuprite

var: Chalcotrichite

Datolite

Descloizite

Digenite

Diopside

Dolomite

Duftite

Enargite

Epidote

Epsomite

Euxenite-(Y)

Ferrimolybdite

Fluorite

Forsterite

Galena

var: Argentiferous Galena

'Garnet'

Gerhardtite

Goethite

Gold

Goslarite

Grossular

Gypsum

var: Selenite

Hedenbergite

Hematite

var: Specularite

Hemimorphite

'Heulandite'

Jarosite

'Jasper'

Kaolinite

Kinoite

'Labradorite'

Laumontite

'Limonite'

Linarite

Lindgrenite

Magnetite

Malachite

Marcasite

'Medmontite'

Melanterite

Microcline

Molybdenite

'Molybdenite-2H'

Montmorillonite

Mottramite

Muscovite

var: Sericite

Nepheline

Nontronite

Opal

var: Opal-AN

Orthoclase

Palygorskite

Perovskite

Phlogopite

Plumbojarosite

Powellite

Pseudoboleite

'Psilomelane'

Pyrite

Pyrolusite

'Pyroxene Group'

Pyrrhotite

Quartz

Rhodochrosite

Rhodonite

'Riebeckite Root Name'

'var: Crocidolite'

Rosasite

Rutile

Samarskite-(Y)

Sanidine

var: Barium-Sanidine

'Scapolite'

Scheelite

Schorl

Sepiolite

'Serpentine Subgroup'

Siderite

Smithsonite

var: Dry Bone Ore

Sphalerite

var: Marmatite

Stibnite

'Stilbite'

Stringhamite

Sulphur

Talc

Tennantite

Tenorite

Tetrahedrite

var: Argentian Tetrahedrite

Titanite

Topaz

Torbernite

'Tourmaline'

Tremolite

Turquoise

Uraninite

var: Pitchblende

Valleriite

Vanadinite

Vesuvianite

Witherite

Wollastonite

Wulfenite

'Zeolite Group'

Zoisite


121 valid minerals.

Rock Types Recorded

Note: this is a very new system on mindat.org and data is currently VERY limited. Please bear with us while we work towards adding this information!

Rock list contains entries from the region specified including sub-localities

Select Rock List Type

Alphabetical List Tree Diagram

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Tithonian - Toarcian
145 - 182.7 Ma
Jurassic granitic rocks

Age: Jurassic (145 - 182.7 Ma)

Description: Granite to diorite, locally foliated and locally alkalic; includes Triassic(?) granitoids in the Trigo Mountains. This unit includes two dominant assemblages of igneous rocks. The Kitt Peak-Trigo Peaks superunit includes, from oldest to youngest: dark, foliated or gneissic diorite, medium-grained equigranular to porphyritic granodiorite, and small, irregular intrusions of light-colored, fine-grained granite. The Ko Vaya superunit, limited to south-central Arizona, includes texturally heterogeneous K-feldspar-rich granitic rocks. (150-180 Ma)

Lithology: Major:{diorite,alkali granite,granodiorite}

Reference: Horton, J.D., C.A. San Juan, and D.B. Stoeser. The State Geologic Map Compilation (SGMC) geodatabase of the conterminous United States. doi: 10.3133/ds1052. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1052. [133]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License


Localities in this Region

USA
USA

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