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Pima Mine (Pima Open Pit Mine), Mission complex, San Xavier, Pima District (Olive District; Mineral Hill District; Twin Buttes District), Sierrita Mts, Pima Co., Arizona, USAi
Regional Level Types
Pima Mine (Pima Open Pit Mine)Mine
Mission complexComplex
San Xavier- not defined -
Pima District (Olive District; Mineral Hill District; Twin Buttes District)Mining District
Sierrita MtsMountain Range
Pima Co.County
ArizonaState
USACountry

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Key
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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
31° 58' 56'' North , 111° 3' 47'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Locality type:
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Sahuarita25,707 (2017)10.5km
East Sahuarita1,622 (2006)13.4km
Summit5,372 (2011)14.1km
Green Valley21,391 (2011)15.7km
Valencia West9,355 (2011)17.4km


‡Ref.: Heinrichs, W.E., Jr. and R.C. Thurmond (1954) A Case History of the Geophysical Discovery of the Pima Mine, Pima County, Arizona. Geophysics: 19(3)(July, 1954): 600-612.

Thurmond, R.E., Heinrichs, W.E., Jr., and Spaulding, E.D. (1954) Geophysical discovery and development of the Pima mine, Pima County, Arizona; a successful exploration project: Mining Engineering: 6(2): 197-202; American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers, Transactions: 199: 197-202.

Mining World (1954) Use of Geophysics Pays Off at Pima with Disclosure of Copper Orebody: October, 1954: 42-45.

Thurmond (1955).

Thurmond, R.E., Olk, J.F., Komadina, G.A., Journeay, J.A., Spaulding, E.D., and Hernlund, R.W. (1958) Pima: a three-part story - Geology, open-pit, milling: Mining Engineering: 10(4): 453-462.

Thurmond, R.E., and Storms, W.R. (1958) Discovery and development of the Pima copper deposit, Pima Mining Co., Pima County, Arizona: U.S. Bureau of Mines Information Circular I.C. 7822, 19 p.

Lacy, W.C. (1959) Structure and ore deposits of the east Sierrita area, in Heindl, L.A., ed., Southern Arizona Guidebook II, combined with the 2nd annual Arizona Geological Society Digest: Arizona Geological Society, p. 184-192.

Journeay, J.S. (1959), Pyrometasomatic deposits at Pima mine, in Southern Arizona guidebook II, Arizona Geological Society Digest: 2: 198-199.

Cooper, J.R. (1960) Some geologic features of the Pima mining district, Pima County, Arizona: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1112-C, p. 63-103, 1 sheet, scale 1:31,680.

Creasey, S.C., and Kistler, R.W. (1962) Age of some copper-bearing porphyries and other igneous rocks in southeastern Arizona, in Short papers in geology, hydrology, and topography, articles 120-179, Geological Survey research 1962: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 450-D, p. D1-D5.

Lacy, W.C., and Titley, S.R. (1962) Geological developments in the Twin Buttes District: Mining Congress Journal: 48(4): 62-64, 76.

Mauger, R.L. (1966) A petrographic and geochemical study of Silver Bell and Pima mining districts, Pima County, Arizona: Tucson, University of Arizona, Ph.D. dissertation, 140 p.

Himes, M.D. (1972) Geology of the Pima mine, Pima County, Arizona: Tucson, University of Arizona, M.S. thesis, 92 p.

Himes, M.D. (1972) Mineralization and alteration at the Pima mine, a complex porphyry copper deposit, Pima County, Arizona: American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers, Preprint no. 72-1-75, 47 p.

Himes, M.D. (1973) Mineralization and alteration at Pima mine - a complex porphyry copper deposit: American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers, Society of Mining Engineers, Transactions: 254: 166-174.

Keith, Stanton B. (1974), Arizona Bureau of Geology & Mineral Technology, Geological Survey Branch Bull. 189, Index of Mining Properties in Pima County, Arizona: 137 (Table 4).

Heinrichs, W.E., Jr. (1976) Pima District, Arizona, A Historical Perspective, A.I.M.E. 105th Annual Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, February, 1976, 15 pp.

Langlois, J.D. (1978) Geology of the Cyprus Pima mine, Pima County, Arizona, in Jenney, J.P., and Hauck, H.R., eds., Proceedings of the Porphyry Copper Symposium, Tucson, Arizona, March 18-20, 1976: Arizona Geological Society Digest,: 11: 103-113.

Sawyer, M.B., Gurmendi, A.C., Daley, M.R., and Howell, S.B. (1992) Principal Deposits of Strategic and Critical Minerals in Arizona, U.S. Bureau of Mines Special Publication, 334 pp.

Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd. ed.: 142, 163, 166, 185, 199, 205, 240, 302, 390, 402, 409.

U.S. Bureau of Mines file data.

Arizona Bureau of Mines file data.

http://www.asarcocu.com/ASARCOinArizona/arinaz01.htm; www.asarco.com.

MRDS database Dep. ID file #10039593, MRDS ID #M050388; and, Dep. ID #10113722, MAS ID #0040190006.

A large surface Cu-Ag-Mo-Zn-Pb-Au mine located in South ½ sec. 36, T.16S., R.12E & the North ½ sec. 1, T.17S., R 12E., 17 miles SE of Tucson. Discovered 1950. First produced 1952 and still productive. Owned by the Union Oil Co.; Cyprus Mines; Utah Mining and Construction; Pima Mining Co., then, finally, ASARCO.

The Pima Mine was developed by another mining firm and was acquired by ASARCO in 1985. It was located at the other end of the Mission pit and is now subhumed by the subsequent workings of the Mission pit of the ASARCO Corp. The road leading to the Mission complex is still named Pima Mine Road.

Mineralization is a porphyry copper, skarn related, deposit of disseminated chalcopyrite and pyrite with minor molybdenum, zinc, and lead minerals with some local high-grade lenses, slightly oxidized in the upper part, in a pyrometasomatic ore deposit in a structurally complex mix of Paleozoic limestone, Cretaceous clastic and volcanic rocks and Laramide quartz monzonite intrusive. Magnetite locally quite massive in tactites, commonly associated with black or green serpentine. The ore body is 486.68 meters long, 487.68 meters wide, 60.96 meters depth to top, 243.84 meters depth to bottom and 182.88 meters thick, strikes E-W and dips about 45S.

Ore control was pre-ore brecciation and stockwork fracturing, wall rock lithologies. Sulfides preferentially replaced calc-magnesian silicates. Ore concentration was the reaction of fluids from the porphyry intrusion with altered sedimentary units. Alteration was propylitic, quartz-sericite, potassic and skarn. The host rock units are the Colima Limestone; Epitaph Formation; Scherrer Formation; Concha Limestone; all of the Naco Group; the Whitcomb Quartzite; Angelica Arkose and the Rodolfo Formation. An associated rock unit is the Ruby Star Granodiorite. The ore body was cut off at depth by the San Xavier Thrust Fault, which cuts the Helmet Fanglomerate (28-30 M.Y.). A breccia pipe is present. Molybdenum is more important in the porphyry and arkose.

Local structures include E-W striking post-mineralization faulting, jointing; and the San Xavier Thrust Fault.

Workings were an open pit operation at 1,524 meters long and 914.4 meters wide, that came into production in 1956. Produced about 104,000,000 tons of ore from 1955 through 1972. This ore averaged about 0.56% Cu and 0.06 oz. Ag/T with by-product molybdenum, zinc and lead.

Regions containing this locality

North America PlateTectonic Plate
Sonoran Desert, North AmericaDesert

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


21 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Bornite
Formula: Cu5FeS4
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 142.
Chalcocite
Formula: Cu2S
Description: A product of secondary enrichment.
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 163; Journeay, J.S. (1959), Pyrometasomatic deposits at Pima mine, in Southern Arizona guidebook II, AZ Geol. Soc. Digest: 2: 198-199.
Chalcopyrite
Formula: CuFeS2
Description: The primary ore mineral closely associated with grossular hornfels.
Reference: Keith, Stanton B. (1974), AZ Bur. of Geol. & Min. Technology, Geol. Survey Br. Bull. 189, Index of Mining Properties in Pima County, AZ: 137 (Table 4); Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 166; Journeay, J.S. (1959), Pyrometasomatic deposits at Pima mine, in Southern Arizona guidebook II, AZ Geol. Soc. Digest: 2: 198-199; Arizona Bureau of Mines file data.
Chrysocolla
Formula: Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Reference: MRDS database Dep. ID file #10039593, MRDS ID #M050388.
Copper
Formula: Cu
Description: Occurs as a secondary mineral.
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 185; Journeay, J.S. (1959), Pyrometasomatic deposits at Pima mine, in Southern Arizona guidebook II, AZ Geol. Soc. Digest: 2: 198-199.
Cuprite
Formula: Cu2O
Reference: MRDS database Dep. ID file #10039593, MRDS ID #M050388.
Datolite
Formula: CaB(SiO4)(OH)
Description: Occurs in thin veins in diopside-garnet tactites as micro-material.
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 199.
Diopside
Formula: CaMgSi2O6
Description: Abundant in limestone hornfels with grossular & tremolite.
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 205, 240; Journeay, J.S. (1959), Pyrometasomatic deposits at Pima mine, in Southern Arizona guidebook II, AZ Geol. Soc. Digest: 2: 198-199.
Galena
Formula: PbS
Reference: MRDS database Dep. ID file #10039593, MRDS ID #M050388.
Grossular
Formula: Ca3Al2(SiO4)3
Description: Abundant in limestone hornfels with diopside & tremolite.
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 205, 240, 402; Journeay, J.S. (1959), Pyrometasomatic deposits at Pima mine, in Southern Arizona guidebook II, AZ Geol. Soc. Digest: 2: 198-199.
Hematite
Formula: Fe2O3
Reference: MRDS database Dep. ID file #10039593, MRDS ID #M050388.
Magnetite
Formula: Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 409.
Malachite
Formula: Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Reference: MRDS database Dep. ID file #10039593, MRDS ID #M050388.
Molybdenite
Formula: MoS2
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 302.
Muscovite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Reference: MRDS database Dep. ID file #10039593, MRDS ID #M050388.
Muscovite var: Sericite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Reference: MRDS database Dep. ID file #10039593, MRDS ID #M050388.
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Reference: Keith, Stanton B. (1974), AZ Bur. of Geol. & Min. Technology, Geol. Survey Br. Bull. 189, Index of Mining Properties in Pima County, AZ: 137 (Table 4); Arizona Bureau of Mines file data.
'Serpentine Subgroup'
Formula: D3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
Reference: MRDS database Dep. ID file #10039593, MRDS ID #M050388.
Sphalerite
Formula: ZnS
Reference: MRDS database Dep. ID file #10039593, MRDS ID #M050388.
Tennantite
Formula: Cu6[Cu4(Fe,Zn)2]As4S13
Description: Minor primary mineral.
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 390.
Tenorite
Formula: CuO
Reference: MRDS database Dep. ID file #10039593, MRDS ID #M050388.
Tremolite
Formula: ☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Description: Abundant in limestone hornfels with diopside & grossular.
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 205, 240, 402; Journeay, J.S. (1959), Pyrometasomatic deposits at Pima mine, in Southern Arizona guidebook II, AZ Geol. Soc. Digest: 2: 198-199.
Valleriite
Formula: (Fe2+,Cu)4(Mg,Al)3S4(OH,O)6
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 409; Min.Rec.: 8: 517.

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 1 - Elements
Copper1.AA.05Cu
Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Bornite2.BA.15Cu5FeS4
Chalcocite2.BA.05Cu2S
Chalcopyrite2.CB.10aCuFeS2
Galena2.CD.10PbS
Molybdenite2.EA.30MoS2
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Sphalerite2.CB.05aZnS
Tennantite2.GB.05Cu6[Cu4(Fe,Zn)2]As4S13
Valleriite2.FD.30(Fe2+,Cu)4(Mg,Al)3S4(OH,O)6
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Cuprite4.AA.10Cu2O
Hematite4.CB.05Fe2O3
Magnetite4.BB.05Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Tenorite4.AB.10CuO
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Malachite5.BA.10Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Group 9 - Silicates
Chrysocolla9.ED.20Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Datolite9.AJ.20CaB(SiO4)(OH)
Diopside9.DA.15CaMgSi2O6
Grossular9.AD.25Ca3Al2(SiO4)3
Muscovite9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
var: Sericite9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Tremolite9.DE.10☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Serpentine Subgroup'-D3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 1 - NATIVE ELEMENTS AND ALLOYS
Metals, other than the Platinum Group
Copper1.1.1.3Cu
Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 2:1
Chalcocite2.4.7.1Cu2S
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 3:2
Bornite2.5.2.1Cu5FeS4
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Galena2.8.1.1PbS
Sphalerite2.8.2.1ZnS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:1
Chalcopyrite2.9.1.1CuFeS2
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Molybdenite2.12.10.1MoS2
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Hydroxysulfides and Hydrated Sulfides
Valleriite2.14.1.1(Fe2+,Cu)4(Mg,Al)3S4(OH,O)6
Group 3 - SULFOSALTS
3 <ø < 4
Tennantite3.3.6.2Cu6[Cu4(Fe,Zn)2]As4S13
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
A2X
Cuprite4.1.1.1Cu2O
AX
Tenorite4.2.3.1CuO
A2X3
Hematite4.3.1.2Fe2O3
Group 7 - MULTIPLE OXIDES
AB2X4
Magnetite7.2.2.3Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Group 16a - ANHYDROUS CARBONATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
Malachite16a.3.1.1Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Group 51 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups Only
Insular SiO4 Groups Only with cations in [6] and >[6] coordination
Grossular51.4.3b.2Ca3Al2(SiO4)3
Group 54 - NESOSILICATES Borosilicates and Some Beryllosilicates
Borosilicates and Some Beryllosilicates with B in [4] coordination
Datolite54.2.1a.1CaB(SiO4)(OH)
Group 65 - INOSILICATES Single-Width,Unbranched Chains,(W=1)
Single-Width Unbranched Chains, W=1 with chains P=2
Diopside65.1.3a.1CaMgSi2O6
Group 66 - INOSILICATES Double-Width,Unbranched Chains,(W=2)
Amphiboles - Mg-Fe-Mn-Li subgroup
Tremolite66.1.3a.1☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Group 71 - PHYLLOSILICATES Sheets of Six-Membered Rings
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 2:1 layers
Muscovite71.2.2a.1KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Group 74 - PHYLLOSILICATES Modulated Layers
Modulated Layers with joined strips
Chrysocolla74.3.2.1Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
Muscovite
var: Sericite
-KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
'Serpentine Subgroup'-D3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H Valleriite(Fe2+,Cu)4(Mg,Al)3S4(OH,O)6
H Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
H DatoliteCaB(SiO4)(OH)
H ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
H MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
H Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
H Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
BBoron
B DatoliteCaB(SiO4)(OH)
CCarbon
C MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
OOxygen
O Valleriite(Fe2+,Cu)4(Mg,Al)3S4(OH,O)6
O MagnetiteFe2+Fe23+O4
O Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
O GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
O DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
O DatoliteCaB(SiO4)(OH)
O ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
O CupriteCu2O
O HematiteFe2O3
O MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
O TenoriteCuO
O Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
O Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
MgMagnesium
Mg Valleriite(Fe2+,Cu)4(Mg,Al)3S4(OH,O)6
Mg Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Mg DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Mg Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
AlAluminium
Al Valleriite(Fe2+,Cu)4(Mg,Al)3S4(OH,O)6
Al GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
Al ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Al Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
Al Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
SiSilicon
Si Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Si GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
Si DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Si DatoliteCaB(SiO4)(OH)
Si ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Si Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
Si Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
SSulfur
S Valleriite(Fe2+,Cu)4(Mg,Al)3S4(OH,O)6
S ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
S PyriteFeS2
S TennantiteCu6[Cu4(Fe,Zn)2]As4S13
S MolybdeniteMoS2
S BorniteCu5FeS4
S ChalcociteCu2S
S GalenaPbS
S SphaleriteZnS
KPotassium
K Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
CaCalcium
Ca Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Ca GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
Ca DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Ca DatoliteCaB(SiO4)(OH)
MnManganese
Mn Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
FeIron
Fe Valleriite(Fe2+,Cu)4(Mg,Al)3S4(OH,O)6
Fe ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe MagnetiteFe2+Fe23+O4
Fe BorniteCu5FeS4
Fe HematiteFe2O3
Fe Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
NiNickel
Ni Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
CuCopper
Cu Valleriite(Fe2+,Cu)4(Mg,Al)3S4(OH,O)6
Cu ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Cu TennantiteCu6[Cu4(Fe,Zn)2]As4S13
Cu BorniteCu5FeS4
Cu ChalcociteCu2S
Cu CopperCu
Cu ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Cu CupriteCu2O
Cu MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
Cu TenoriteCuO
ZnZinc
Zn SphaleriteZnS
Zn Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
AsArsenic
As TennantiteCu6[Cu4(Fe,Zn)2]As4S13
MoMolybdenum
Mo MolybdeniteMoS2
PbLead
Pb GalenaPbS

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Holocene - Gelasian
0 - 2.588 Ma



ID: 2774482
Quaternary surficial deposits, undivided

Age: Pleistocene (0 - 2.588 Ma)

Description: Unconsolidated to strongly consolidated alluvial and eolian deposits. This unit includes: coarse, poorly sorted alluvial fan and terrace deposits on middle and upper piedmonts and along large drainages; sand, silt and clay on alluvial plains and playas; and wind-blown sand deposits. (0-2 Ma)

Comments: Original map source: Arizona Geological Survey, DI-8 Geologic Map of Arizona, Digital Spatial data for the Geologic Map of Arizona, v. 3.0, edited by S.M. Richard and S.M. Kneale, 2002, 10 p., 2 DOS HD disks. Arc/INFO export file (.e00) format, scale 1:1,000,000.

Lithology: Major:{sand,silt,clay}

Reference: Horton, J.D., C.A. San Juan, and D.B. Stoeser. The State Geologic Map Compilation (SGMC) geodatabase of the conterminous United States. doi: 10.3133/ds1052. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1052. [133]

Quaternary - Miocene
0 - 23.03 Ma



ID: 3185380
Cenozoic sedimentary rocks

Age: Cenozoic (0 - 23.03 Ma)

Lithology: Sedimentary rocks

Reference: Chorlton, L.B. Generalized geology of the world: bedrock domains and major faults in GIS format: a small-scale world geology map with an extended geological attribute database. doi: 10.4095/223767. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 5529. [154]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License

USGS MRDS Record:10039593
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