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Monte Blanco Mine (Monte Blanco deposit; Monte Blanco adit), Monte Blanco, Black Mts, Amargosa Range, Inyo Co., California, USAi
Regional Level Types
Monte Blanco Mine (Monte Blanco deposit; Monte Blanco adit)Mine
Monte BlancoMountain
Black MtsMountain Range
Amargosa RangeMountain Range
Inyo Co.County
CaliforniaState
USACountry

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Key
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
36° 22' 46'' North , 116° 46' 4'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Locality type:
Köppen climate type:


A former borate mine located in the NE¼NE¼ sec. 17, T26N, R2E, SBM, on the E face of Monte Blanco, eastern margin of the Black Mountains, on National Park Service wilderness land (Death Valley National Park/Death Valley Wilderness). First operated in 1915. Owned by the U.S. Borax and Chemical Co. (1976). MRDS database stated accuracy for this location is 1,000 meters.

NOTE: The coordinates provided are for the exact location reflected on the topo map as a group of mining symbols (adits).

Mineralization is a Miocene borate deposit (Mineral occurrence model information: Model code 260; USGS model code: 35b.3; Deposit model name: Lacustrine borates), hosted in rocks of the Miocene Furnace Creek Formation (shale, limestone). The deposit crops out. Associated rocks include Pliocene-Miocene basalts. Local rocks include Tertiary nonmarine rocks, undivided.

Local geologic structures include a fault.

This mine is barely a mine and might more properly be called a prospect. It consists of a short tunnel with a couple of little side tunnels of no more than eight or ten feet long. It is best known for its reticulated primary meyerhofferite specimens. All of them are pretty small and I have never seen anything much larger than a minature. It is also home of probably the best specimens of meyerhofferite after inyoite, in most of which the inyoite has been completely altered to white meyerhofferite. The largest of these specimens is perhaps 30 to 40 cm though most are smaller. The pseudomorphs can measure up to 10 cm. There is also abundant drusy colemanite at this prospect/mine.
Rock Currier 2013.

Reserve-Resource data are found in: Evans, James R., G.C. Taylor, and J.S. Rapp (1976).

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


8 valid minerals. 2 (TL) - type locality of valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Analcime
Formula: Na(AlSi2O6) · H2O
Reference: Tschernich, R. (1992): Zeolites of the World, 64
Colemanite
Formula: Ca[B3O4(OH)3] · H2O
Reference: Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II: 359; Schaller, Waldemar Theodore (1916b), Inyoite and meyerhofferite, two new calcium borates: USGS Bulletin 610: 35; Foshag, William Frederick (1924), The world’s biggest borax deposits (California and Nevada): Engineering & Mining Journal: 118: 420; Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 264, 376.
Hydroboracite
Formula: CaMg[B3O4(OH)3]2 · 3H2O
Reference: www.mineralsocal.org
Inyoite (TL)
Formula: Ca(H4B3O7)(OH) · 4H2O
Type Locality:
Habit: Tabular
Colour: White
Description: Occurs as tabular crystals altering to meyerhofferite.
Reference: Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences (1914): 4: 354-356; Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II: 359; Schaller, Waldemar Theodore (1916b), Inyoite and meyerhofferite, two new calcium borates: USGS Bulletin 610: 35; Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 264.
Meyerhofferite (TL)
Formula: Ca2(H3B3O7)2 · 4H2O
Type Locality:
Colour: White
Description: Occurs as chalky to silky pseudomorphs after inyoite, as alteration coatings on inyoite crystals, and as long, glassy, interlaced crystals formed by recrystallization of the original fibrous material.
Reference: Journal of the Washington Academy of Science (1914): 4: 354-356; Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, 7th. ed., Volume II: 357, 359; Schaller, Waldemar Theodore (1916b), Inyoite and meyerhofferite, two new calcium borates: USGS Bulletin 610: 35; Foshag, William Frederick (1921), The origin of the colemanite deposits of California: Economic Geology: 16: 200; Foshag, William Frederick (1924a), Famous mineral localities: Furnace Creek, Death Valley, California: American Mineralogist: 9: 10; Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 264.
Priceite
Formula: Ca2B5O7(OH)5 · H2O
Reference: Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II: 359.
Todorokite
Formula: (Na,Ca,K,Ba,Sr)1-x(Mn,Mg,Al)6O12 · 3-4H2O
Description: inclusions in transparent colemanite crystals
Reference: Bob Massey micromount collection, # GRM 1963A
Ulexite
Formula: NaCa[B5O6(OH)6] · 5H2O
Description: Occurs as large compact masses with colemanite.
Reference: Foshag, William Frederick (1924), The world’s biggest borax deposits (California and Nevada): Engineering & Mining Journal: 118: 420; Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 376.

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Todorokite4.DK.10(Na,Ca,K,Ba,Sr)1-x(Mn,Mg,Al)6O12 · 3-4H2O
Group 6 - Borates
Colemanite6.CB.10Ca[B3O4(OH)3] · H2O
Hydroboracite6.CB.15CaMg[B3O4(OH)3]2 · 3H2O
Inyoite (TL)6.CA.35Ca(H4B3O7)(OH) · 4H2O
Meyerhofferite (TL)6.CA.30Ca2(H3B3O7)2 · 4H2O
Priceite6.EB.25Ca2B5O7(OH)5 · H2O
Ulexite6.EA.25NaCa[B5O6(OH)6] · 5H2O
Group 9 - Silicates
Analcime9.GB.05Na(AlSi2O6) · H2O

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 7 - MULTIPLE OXIDES
AB3X7
Todorokite7.8.1.1(Na,Ca,K,Ba,Sr)1-x(Mn,Mg,Al)6O12 · 3-4H2O
Group 25 - ANHYDROUS BORATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
Pentaborates
Priceite25.5.1.1Ca2B5O7(OH)5 · H2O
Group 26 - HYDRATED BORATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
Triborates
Colemanite26.3.5.1Ca[B3O4(OH)3] · H2O
Hydroboracite26.3.6.1CaMg[B3O4(OH)3]2 · 3H2O
Inyoite (TL)26.3.1.1Ca(H4B3O7)(OH) · 4H2O
Meyerhofferite (TL)26.3.2.1Ca2(H3B3O7)2 · 4H2O
Pentaborates
Ulexite26.5.11.1NaCa[B5O6(OH)6] · 5H2O
Group 77 - TECTOSILICATES Zeolites
Zeolite group - True zeolites
Analcime77.1.1.1Na(AlSi2O6) · H2O

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H InyoiteCa(H4B3O7)(OH) · 4H2O
H MeyerhofferiteCa2(H3B3O7)2 · 4H2O
H UlexiteNaCa[B5O6(OH)6] · 5H2O
H ColemaniteCa[B3O4(OH)3] · H2O
H HydroboraciteCaMg[B3O4(OH)3]2 · 3H2O
H AnalcimeNa(AlSi2O6) · H2O
H PriceiteCa2B5O7(OH)5 · H2O
H Todorokite(Na,Ca,K,Ba,Sr)1-x(Mn,Mg,Al)6O12 · 3-4H2O
BBoron
B InyoiteCa(H4B3O7)(OH) · 4H2O
B MeyerhofferiteCa2(H3B3O7)2 · 4H2O
B UlexiteNaCa[B5O6(OH)6] · 5H2O
B ColemaniteCa[B3O4(OH)3] · H2O
B HydroboraciteCaMg[B3O4(OH)3]2 · 3H2O
B PriceiteCa2B5O7(OH)5 · H2O
OOxygen
O InyoiteCa(H4B3O7)(OH) · 4H2O
O MeyerhofferiteCa2(H3B3O7)2 · 4H2O
O UlexiteNaCa[B5O6(OH)6] · 5H2O
O ColemaniteCa[B3O4(OH)3] · H2O
O HydroboraciteCaMg[B3O4(OH)3]2 · 3H2O
O AnalcimeNa(AlSi2O6) · H2O
O PriceiteCa2B5O7(OH)5 · H2O
O Todorokite(Na,Ca,K,Ba,Sr)1-x(Mn,Mg,Al)6O12 · 3-4H2O
NaSodium
Na UlexiteNaCa[B5O6(OH)6] · 5H2O
Na AnalcimeNa(AlSi2O6) · H2O
Na Todorokite(Na,Ca,K,Ba,Sr)1-x(Mn,Mg,Al)6O12 · 3-4H2O
MgMagnesium
Mg HydroboraciteCaMg[B3O4(OH)3]2 · 3H2O
Mg Todorokite(Na,Ca,K,Ba,Sr)1-x(Mn,Mg,Al)6O12 · 3-4H2O
AlAluminium
Al AnalcimeNa(AlSi2O6) · H2O
Al Todorokite(Na,Ca,K,Ba,Sr)1-x(Mn,Mg,Al)6O12 · 3-4H2O
SiSilicon
Si AnalcimeNa(AlSi2O6) · H2O
KPotassium
K Todorokite(Na,Ca,K,Ba,Sr)1-x(Mn,Mg,Al)6O12 · 3-4H2O
CaCalcium
Ca InyoiteCa(H4B3O7)(OH) · 4H2O
Ca MeyerhofferiteCa2(H3B3O7)2 · 4H2O
Ca UlexiteNaCa[B5O6(OH)6] · 5H2O
Ca ColemaniteCa[B3O4(OH)3] · H2O
Ca HydroboraciteCaMg[B3O4(OH)3]2 · 3H2O
Ca PriceiteCa2B5O7(OH)5 · H2O
Ca Todorokite(Na,Ca,K,Ba,Sr)1-x(Mn,Mg,Al)6O12 · 3-4H2O
MnManganese
Mn Todorokite(Na,Ca,K,Ba,Sr)1-x(Mn,Mg,Al)6O12 · 3-4H2O
SrStrontium
Sr Todorokite(Na,Ca,K,Ba,Sr)1-x(Mn,Mg,Al)6O12 · 3-4H2O
BaBarium
Ba Todorokite(Na,Ca,K,Ba,Sr)1-x(Mn,Mg,Al)6O12 · 3-4H2O

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Journal of the Washington Academy of Science (1914): 4: 354-356.
Schaller, Waldemar Theodore (1916b), Inyoite and meyerhofferite, two new calcium borates: USGS Bulletin 610: 35.
Foshag, William Frederick (1921), The origin of the colemanite deposits of California: Economic Geology: 16: 200.
Foshag, William Frederick (1924a), Famous mineral localities: Furnace Creek, Death Valley, California: American Mineralogist: 9: 10.
Foshag, William Frederick (1924), The world’s biggest borax deposits (California and Nevada): Engineering & Mining Journal: 118: 420.
Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, 7th. edition, Volume II: 359.
Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 264, 376.
Evans, James R., G.C. Taylor, and J.S. Rapp (1976) Mines and mineral deposits in Death Valley National Monument. California Division Mines and Geology Special Report 125: 61 pp.: 28.
Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press.
Tschernich, R. (1992): Zeolites of the World: 64.
USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10102207 & 10139460.
U.S. Bureau of Mines, Minerals Availability System (MAS) file ID #0060271265.

USGS MRDS Record:10102207

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