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Pioche District, Lincoln Co., Nevada, USAi
Regional Level Types
Pioche DistrictMining District
Lincoln Co.County
NevadaState
USACountry

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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 37° 56' 6'' North , 114° 27' 6'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 37.93526,-114.45194
GeoHash:G#: 9qwxg9fsu
Locality type:Mining District
Köppen climate type:BSk : Cold semi-arid (steppe) climate


Location & History: The Pioche District is a former Pb-Ag-Au-Mn-Fe-Cu-Zn-As mining area located in secs. 14, 17, 22, 23, 26, 32, 33 & 4, T1N, R67E, MDM, in the Pioche Hills southwest of Pioche, about 19 miles W of the Utah-Nevada border, on mixed ownership land including private land and Bureau of Land Management administered land (Bureau of Land Management Las Vegas administrative district). Owned & operated by Kerr-McGee.

The initial mineral discovery in Pioche occurred in 1863 and mining production began in 1869. The original ore consisted of oxidized silver chlorides occurring in fissures in Cambrian quartzites. The Raymond and Ely vein system contained high-grade lead-silver ore that was mined in the 1870s At one time Pioche was one of largest silver districts in the United States. Total mineral production exceeded $130,000,000. The primary metal values were for gold, silver, lead, zinc and copper. Low-grade argentiferous manganese oxides were also found in the region. Major periods of production were: 1895-1901; 1912-1920; 1934-1953; and 1958-1959. Minimal activity has occurred from 1959 to the present time. Early milling occurred in Pioche, but a shortage of water forced the mills to be relocated to Bullionville (near Panaca) around 1871. In 1924 Combined Metals Reduction Company developed a selective flotation process to treat the massive lead-zinc sulfide ores. Combined Metals Reduction Company processed ore at a mill in Bauer, Utah from 1923-1941, until the Caselton Mill was built in 1941. Mountain Mines, Inc. acquired the Caselton Tailings after the bankruptcy of Combined Metals Reduction Company in 1976. Mountain Mines, Inc. claims to have produced precious metals from the tailings with a small chemical processing facility located in the vicinity of the tailings. Numerous mining companies have had operators or exploration activity at site, including: Meadow Valley Mining Company (1864-1876); Consolidated Mining Company (1880's); White Pine Minerals Company (?); Combined Metals Reduction Company (1924-present); Pioche Manganese Company (WWII); Comet Coalition Mining Company (1964-1978); St. Patrick Mining Company (1975); Bunker Hill Mining Company (1976-77); Kerr-McGee Chemical Company (1980); Mountain Mines, Inc. (1976-present). Homestake Mining Company, Prince Consolidated Mining Company and Anaconda Company also have been active in the area. Midway Gold Company has recently (2004) been exploring for a faulted offset of the high-grade silver-gold Salt Lake Pioche vein under post- mineral volcanic rock. The property consists of five patented and 36 unpatented claims lying south of the town of Pioche on a combination of private patented mining claims and BLM administered lands. Midway began a 3500 foot reverse circulation drill program on the Pioche Project in October 2004.

Mineralogy/Geology:

Mineralization: Mineralization is replacement deposits (Mineral occurrence model information: Model code: 72; USGS model code 19a; Deposit model name: polymetallic replacement; Mark3 model number: 47), hosted in Early Cambrian/Neoproterozoic quartzite [Prospect Mountain Quartzite]; Early Cambrian limestone [Combined Metals Member of the Pioche Shale]; Middle Cambrian limestone [Lyndon Limestone]; Early Ordovician/Late Cambrian limestone [Mendha Limestone]; Middle Cambrian limestone [Highland Peak Limestone]; and, Tertiary granite porphyry dikes. Associated rocks include Middle Cambrian shale [Chisholm Shale]; Early Ordovician limestone [Yellow Hill Limestone]; Early Ordovician limestone [Tank Hill Limestone]; Late Ordovician/Middle Ordovician quartzite [Eureka Quartzite]; Late Ordovician dolomite [Ely Springs Dolomite]; Middle Devonian dolomite [Silverhorn Dolomite]; Late Devonian dolomite [West Range Dolomite]; dacite; andesite; rhyolite; Early Mississippian limestone [Bristol Pass Limestone]; Late Mississippian siltstone [Peers Spring Formation]; Late Mississippian quartzite [Scotty Wash Quartzite]; quartz monzonite intrusives; tuff; and, Pennsylvanian/Mississippian limestone [Bailey Spring Limestone]. Local alteration includes oxidation and hydrothermal activity. Local rocks include alluvial deposits.

The ore bodies are tabular to lenticular replacement bodies, tapering away from fissures. Controls for ore emplacement include the intersections of steep fissures and limestone beds in the Pioche Shale.

Deposits are of 3 types: (1) silver-bearing fissure veins in quartzite; (2) silver-bearing mineralized granite porphyry; (3) replacement deposits in limestone and dolomite. All of them appear to have been formed at about the same time, in the epoch of mineralization that occurred shortly after the intrusion of the granitic rocks and their allied dikes of granite porphyry and lamprophyre.

The main orebody at the Caselton, Raymond & Ely/Combined Metals Reduction #1 mines is the result of selected replacement of the Combined Metals Limestone bed where it intersects the steeply-dipping Greenwood Fissure, which is a fault of slight displacement, usually expressed as a thin gouge seam but which may be up to 5 feet thick. It trends N70E, and dips 65-70N, nearly paralleling the Raymond and Ely vein, which dips 75S. The ore has been offset by many cross-faults the main orebody is a tabular massive sulfide bed extending laterally into the limestone layer, thickest (30-40 feet) adjacent to the Greenwood Fissure, and tapering down away from it. Bedded ore occurs up to 200 feet on either side of the Greenwood Fissure. The ore of the upper bed preserves the nodular character of the limestone host. Ore consists of about 60% pyrite, 22% sphalerite, 8% galena, minor chalcopyrite and practically no gangue minerals. The lower bed ore is massive with an irregular bottom contact, as the underlying quartzite has been irregularly replaced by pyrite and sphalerite. The ore is unoxidized. The Raymond and Ely vein in the Prospect Mountain Quartzite strikes parallel to the Greenwood Fissure. The Greenwood ore occurs chiefly in Pioche Shale. The Black Ledge vein of quartz and sphalerite was also mined yielding 12-20% zinc and 5-21 ounces of silver per ton. The Raymond and Ely vein system splits eastward into two branches: the Meadow Valley vein and the Burke Vein. The largest and richest ore shoot in the vein occurred just below the Pioche Shale within about 400 feet of the Yuba Dike. The complex sulfide ore was of no value until selective flotation was invented. The ore bed was mined for more than 10,000 feet along an east west channel 100 to 1800 feet wide. Ore body terminates against the frontal fault. The hanging wall was unsuccessfully explored to a depth of 2500 feet. Most gold came from the Combined Metals Mine. On Treasure Hill, the workings explore a series of faults and shears and the north end of the Yuba dike, a principal contributor to the mineralization of the area. Much of the fault breccia shows milling texture with jarosite and iron-manganese oxides coating most exposed surfaces. The quartzite ranges from white to grey-rose colored with prominent banding. Pods of very fine-grained argentiferous minerals along with galena and other sulfides are disseminated throughout the breccia. Yellow oxides are also common on exposed surfaces. Abundant sericite is present. Locally the breccia zones are silicified and abundant gossan occurs where ore minerals have weathered out. Late opaline silica is deposited on fracture surfaces and iron sulfides have altered to specular hematite. Euhedral quartz crystals line cavities. Quartz vein material which fills fault fissures exhibits brecciation and is recemented with silica, and contains bands of finely disseminated grey sulfides. The Raymond and Ely, Meadow Valley, and Burke veins strike roughly east-west and dip 50 degrees south. Oxidized silver ore in the quartzite decreased in grade eastward and downward. The Meadow Valley vein was mined continuously for 2000 feet to a depth of 1,200 feet. Average ore thickness was 2-3 feet. Galena and sphalerite are increasingly abundant in the lower levels. Rich silver-lead ore was mined from the Yuba Dike. Three or more cross veins strike northeast at 45 degrees to the principal veins. The "quartzite fissures" are veins with filling of loose rubble of angular quartzite fragments to breccia cemented by lead carbonate, limonite, and jarosite. The quartzite fissures strie N15-20W.

Geologic structures: Local structures include steeply dipping fissures - N50-70E mineralized zone. Regional structures include E-W and N-S normal faulting before thrusting; N60 degree S faults mineralized; N-S, NW-trending post mineralization. The Pioche Hills appear to be a window in a regional thrust of upper Cambrian rocks over lower Cambrian and Tertiary volcanics. The Pioche Shale bed was dropped by closely spaced parallel normal faults. mineralization principally occur in the Combined Metals bed of the Pioche Shale. Highland Peak overthrust.

The Combined Metals member of the Pioche Shale is the host rock for the replacement ore bodies. It consists of 3 parts: (1): a lower 3 foot of massive limestone; (2): a middle 3-foot thick calcareous sandstone (which in the ore body is unreplaced) and, (3): an upper 30-foot layer of thin-bedded nodular limestones, usually only 2-3 inches thick, and so nodular that they look like "beds of flattened potatoes." The nodules are coated with a thin black carbonaceous skin. The Pioche Shale belt trends NW between 2 faults.

Workings: The veins were developed by extensive underground workings, including shafts, adits, trenches, cuts, and prospect pits. Most of the old underground workings were caved by the 1980's. There was a small open pit and heap-leach operation working in the 1980's. Water was in the old workings at the 1,200 foot level.

Production Information: From 1905 to 1958 the total production from the Pioche district mines was 810,366 ounces of Au, 17,956,492 ounces of Ag, 6,254,900 pounds of Cu, 317,007,800 pounds of Pb, 640,224,100 pounds of Zn, and 711,400 tons of Mn ore. 1869 to 1904 production was not broken down. Reserves: 1958: Caselton type ore: 2,642,830 metric tons (includes production) 0.046% Au, 5.32% Ag, 4.81% Pb, 11.82% Zn; Pan American type ore: 149,629 metric tons, 0.028% Au, 1.64% Ag, 1.39% Pb, 2.66% Zn, 9.7% Mn; 1952: Caselton type ore: 674,300 metric tons (includes production) 0.013% Au, 0.65% Ag, 0.6% Pb, 9.5% Zn, 0.4% Cu; 1949: Caselton type ore: 197,921 metric tons (includes production) 0.035% Au, 3.21% Ag, 1.24% Pb, 9.7% Zn, 0.14% Cu; 12.32% Mn (oxidized ore); 31.5% Fe (oxidized ore).

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Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Commodity List

This is a list of exploitable or exploited mineral commodities recorded from this region.


Mineral List

Mineral list contains entries from the region specified including sub-localities

62 valid minerals.

Rock Types Recorded

Note: this is a very new system on mindat.org and data is currently VERY limited. Please bear with us while we work towards adding this information!

Rock list contains entries from the region specified including sub-localities

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Alphabetical List Tree Diagram

Detailed Mineral List:

Acanthite
Formula: Ag2S
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
'Andesite'
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Andradite
Formula: Ca3Fe3+2(SiO4)3
Anglesite
Formula: PbSO4
Antimony
Formula: Sb
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Arsenopyrite
Formula: FeAsS
Atacamite
Formula: Cu2(OH)3Cl
Reference: Rocks & Minerals, Nov. 1999
Azurite
Formula: Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Baryte
Formula: BaSO4
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Beaverite-(Cu)
Formula: Pb(Fe3+2Cu)(SO4)2(OH)6
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
'Bindheimite'
Formula: Pb2Sb2O6O
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Bornite
Formula: Cu5FeS4
Braunite
Formula: Mn2+Mn3+6(SiO4)O8
Brochantite
Formula: Cu4(SO4)(OH)6
Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Cerussite
Formula: PbCO3
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Chalcophanite
Formula: (Zn,Fe,Mn)Mn3O7 · 3H2O
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Chalcopyrite
Formula: CuFeS2
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Chlorargyrite
Formula: AgCl
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Chrysocolla
Formula: Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Cupropavonite
Formula: Cu0.9Ag0.5Pb0.6Bi2.5S5
Reference: Rocks & Minerals, Nov. 1999
'Dacite'
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Diopside
Formula: CaMgSi2O6
'Dolostone'
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Ferberite
Formula: FeWO4
Fluoborite
Formula: Mg3(BO3)(F,OH)3
Reference: Gillson, J. L. and Shannon, Earl V. (1925) Am. Min., v. 10, p. 137. Geijer, Per (1926) Norbergite and Fluoborite, GFF, v. 28 (1), p. Rocks & Minerals, Nov. 1999
Forsterite
Formula: Mg2SiO4
Galena
Formula: PbS
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Gold
Formula: Au
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Gypsum
Formula: CaSO4 · 2H2O
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Hematite
Formula: Fe2O3
Hemimorphite
Formula: Zn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Hydromagnesite
Formula: Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2 · 4H2O
Hydroxylapatite
Formula: Ca5(PO4)3(OH)
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Hydrozincite
Formula: Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6
Jarosite
Formula: KFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
Reference: Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II: 562; Rocks & Minerals, Nov. 1999; USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Kaolinite
Formula: Al2(Si2O5)(OH)4
'Lamprophyre'
Reference: Westgate, L. G., Knopf, Adolph (1932), Geology and ore deposits of the Pioche district, Nevada. USGS Professional Paper 171, 79 pp.
'Limestone'
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
'Limonite'
Formula: (Fe,O,OH,H2O)
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Linarite
Formula: PbCu(SO4)(OH)2
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Ludwigite
Formula: Mg2Fe3+(BO3)O2
Reference: Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II: 323.
Magnetite
Formula: Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Malachite
Formula: Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Reference: Rocks & Minerals, Nov. 1999
Melanterite
Formula: Fe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Minium
Formula: Pb3O4
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Muscovite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Muscovite var: Sericite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Natrojarosite
Formula: NaFe3(SO4)2(OH)6
Pearceite
Formula: [Ag9CuS4][(Ag,Cu)6(As,Sb)2S7]
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Phosgenite
Formula: Pb2CO3Cl2
Plumbojarosite
Formula: Pb0.5Fe3+3(SO4)2(OH)6
'Porphyry'
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Proustite
Formula: Ag3AsS3
'Psilomelane'
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Pyrargyrite
Formula: Ag3SbS3
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Pyrolusite
Formula: Mn4+O2
Pyromorphite
Formula: Pb5(PO4)3Cl
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada; USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
'Quartzite'
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
'Quartz-monzonite'
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Rhodochrosite
Formula: MnCO3
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
'Rhyolite'
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Sepiolite
Formula: Mg4(Si6O15)(OH)2 · 6H2O
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
'Serpentine Subgroup'
Formula: D3[Si2O5](OH)4 D= Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
'Shale'
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Siderite
Formula: FeCO3
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada; USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
'Siltstone'
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Silver
Formula: Ag
'commodity:Silver'
Formula: Ag
Smithsonite
Formula: ZnCO3
Sphalerite
Formula: ZnS
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Spinel
Formula: MgAl2O4
Szaibélyite
Formula: MgBO2(OH)
Reference: Rocks & Minerals, Nov. 1999
Tennantite
Formula: Cu6[Cu4(Fe,Zn)2]As4S13
Tripuhyite
Formula: Fe3+Sb5+O4
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
'Tuff'
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394.
Vanadinite
Formula: Pb5(VO4)3Cl
'Wad'
Localities: Reported from at least 13 localities in this region.
Willemite
Formula: Zn2SiO4

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 1 - Elements
'Antimony'1.CA.05Sb
'Gold'1.AA.05Au
Silver1.AA.05Ag
Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
'Acanthite'2.BA.35Ag2S
'Arsenopyrite'2.EB.20FeAsS
'Bornite'2.BA.15Cu5FeS4
'Chalcopyrite'2.CB.10aCuFeS2
'Cupropavonite'2.JA.05aCu0.9Ag0.5Pb0.6Bi2.5S5
'Galena'2.CD.10PbS
'Pearceite'2.GB.15[Ag9CuS4][(Ag,Cu)6(As,Sb)2S7]
'Proustite'2.GA.05Ag3AsS3
'Pyrargyrite'2.GA.05Ag3SbS3
'Pyrite'2.EB.05aFeS2
Sphalerite2.CB.05aZnS
Tennantite2.GB.05Cu6[Cu4(Fe,Zn)2]As4S13
Group 3 - Halides
'Atacamite'3.DA.10aCu2(OH)3Cl
'Chlorargyrite'3.AA.15AgCl
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
'Bindheimite'4.DH.20Pb2Sb2O6O
'Chalcophanite'4.FL.20(Zn,Fe,Mn)Mn3O7 · 3H2O
'Ferberite'4.DB.30FeWO4
'Hematite'4.CB.05Fe2O3
'Magnetite'4.BB.05Fe2+Fe3+2O4
'Minium'4.BD.05Pb3O4
'Pyrolusite'4.DB.05Mn4+O2
'Quartz'4.DA.05SiO2
Spinel4.BB.05MgAl2O4
Tripuhyite4.DB.05Fe3+Sb5+O4
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
'Azurite'5.BA.05Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2
'Calcite'5.AB.05CaCO3
'Cerussite'5.AB.15PbCO3
'Hydromagnesite'5.DA.05Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2 · 4H2O
'Hydrozincite'5.BA.15Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6
'Malachite'5.BA.10Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
'Phosgenite'5.BE.20Pb2CO3Cl2
'Rhodochrosite'5.AB.05MnCO3
Siderite5.AB.05FeCO3
Smithsonite5.AB.05ZnCO3
Group 6 - Borates
'Fluoborite'6.AB.50Mg3(BO3)(F,OH)3
'Ludwigite'6.AB.30Mg2Fe3+(BO3)O2
Szaibélyite6.BA.15MgBO2(OH)
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
'Anglesite'7.AD.35PbSO4
'Baryte'7.AD.35BaSO4
'Beaverite-(Cu)'7.BC.10Pb(Fe3+2Cu)(SO4)2(OH)6
'Brochantite'7.BB.25Cu4(SO4)(OH)6
'Gypsum'7.CD.40CaSO4 · 2H2O
'Jarosite'7.BC.10KFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
'Linarite'7.BC.65PbCu(SO4)(OH)2
'Melanterite'7.CB.35Fe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
'Natrojarosite'7.BC.10NaFe3(SO4)2(OH)6
'Plumbojarosite'7.BC.10Pb0.5Fe3+3(SO4)2(OH)6
Group 8 - Phosphates, Arsenates and Vanadates
'Hydroxylapatite'8.BN.05Ca5(PO4)3(OH)
'Pyromorphite'8.BN.05Pb5(PO4)3Cl
Vanadinite8.BN.05Pb5(VO4)3Cl
Group 9 - Silicates
'Andradite'9.AD.25Ca3Fe3+2(SiO4)3
'Braunite'9.AG.05Mn2+Mn3+6(SiO4)O8
'Chrysocolla'9.ED.20Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
'Diopside'9.DA.15CaMgSi2O6
'Forsterite'9.AC.05Mg2SiO4
'Hemimorphite'9.BD.10Zn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
'Kaolinite'9.ED.05Al2(Si2O5)(OH)4
'Muscovite'9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
var: Sericite9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
'Sepiolite'9.EE.25Mg4(Si6O15)(OH)2 · 6H2O
Willemite9.AA.05Zn2SiO4
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Andesite'-
'Dacite'-
'Dolostone'-
'Lamprophyre'-
'Limestone'-
'Limonite'-(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
'Porphyry'-
'Psilomelane'-
'Quartz-monzonite'-
'Quartzite'-
'Rhyolite'-
Serpentine Subgroup-D3[Si2O5](OH)4 D= Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
Shale-
Siltstone-
Tuff-
Wad-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 1 - NATIVE ELEMENTS AND ALLOYS
Metals, other than the Platinum Group
Gold1.1.1.1Au
Silver1.1.1.2Ag
Semi-metals and non-metals
Antimony1.3.1.2Sb
Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 2:1
Acanthite2.4.1.1Ag2S
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 3:2
Bornite2.5.2.1Cu5FeS4
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Galena2.8.1.1PbS
Sphalerite2.8.2.1ZnS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:1
Chalcopyrite2.9.1.1CuFeS2
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Arsenopyrite2.12.4.1FeAsS
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 3 - SULFOSALTS
ø > 4
Pearceite3.1.8.1[Ag9CuS4][(Ag,Cu)6(As,Sb)2S7]
3 <ø < 4
Tennantite3.3.6.2Cu6[Cu4(Fe,Zn)2]As4S13
ø = 3
Proustite3.4.1.1Ag3AsS3
Pyrargyrite3.4.1.2Ag3SbS3
1 < ø < 2
Cupropavonite3.8.10.6Cu0.9Ag0.5Pb0.6Bi2.5S5
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
A2X3
Hematite4.3.1.2Fe2O3
AX2
Pyrolusite4.4.1.4Mn4+O2
Group 7 - MULTIPLE OXIDES
AB2X4
Magnetite7.2.2.3Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Minium7.2.8.1Pb3O4
Spinel7.2.1.1MgAl2O4
(AB)2X3
Braunite7.5.1.3Mn2+Mn3+6(SiO4)O8
AB3X7
Chalcophanite7.8.2.1(Zn,Fe,Mn)Mn3O7 · 3H2O
Group 9 - NORMAL HALIDES
AX
Chlorargyrite9.1.4.1AgCl
Group 10 - OXYHALIDES AND HYDROXYHALIDES
A2(O,OH)3Xq
Atacamite10.1.1.1Cu2(OH)3Cl
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
Cerussite14.1.3.4PbCO3
Rhodochrosite14.1.1.4MnCO3
Siderite14.1.1.3FeCO3
Smithsonite14.1.1.6ZnCO3
Group 16a - ANHYDROUS CARBONATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
Azurite16a.2.1.1Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Malachite16a.3.1.1Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Phosgenite16a.3.4.1Pb2CO3Cl2
Hydrozincite16a.4.1.1Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6
Group 16b - HYDRATED CARBONATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
Hydromagnesite16b.7.1.1Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2 · 4H2O
Group 24 - ANHYDROUS BORATES
A2BO2[XO3]
Ludwigite24.2.1.1Mg2Fe3+(BO3)O2
Group 25 - ANHYDROUS BORATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
Monoborates
Fluoborite25.1.2.1Mg3(BO3)(F,OH)3
Diborates
Szaibélyite25.2.1.2MgBO2(OH)
Group 28 - ANHYDROUS ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4
Anglesite28.3.1.3PbSO4
Baryte28.3.1.1BaSO4
Group 29 - HYDRATED ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4·xH2O
Gypsum29.6.3.1CaSO4 · 2H2O
Melanterite29.6.10.1Fe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
Group 30 - ANHYDROUS SULFATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
(AB)m(XO4)pZq, where m:p>2:1
Brochantite30.1.3.1Cu4(SO4)(OH)6
(AB)2(XO4)Zq
Beaverite-(Cu)30.2.5.7Pb(Fe3+2Cu)(SO4)2(OH)6
Jarosite30.2.5.1KFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
Linarite30.2.3.1PbCu(SO4)(OH)2
Plumbojarosite30.2.5.6Pb0.5Fe3+3(SO4)2(OH)6
Group 41 - ANHYDROUS PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
A5(XO4)3Zq
Hydroxylapatite41.8.1.3Ca5(PO4)3(OH)
Pyromorphite41.8.4.1Pb5(PO4)3Cl
Vanadinite41.8.4.3Pb5(VO4)3Cl
Group 44 - ANTIMONATES
A2X2O6(O,OH,F)
'Bindheimite'44.1.1.2Pb2Sb2O6O
AX2O6
Tripuhyite44.2.1.3Fe3+Sb5+O4
Group 48 - ANHYDROUS MOLYBDATES AND TUNGSTATES
AXO4
Ferberite48.1.1.2FeWO4
Group 51 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups Only
Insular SiO4 Groups Only with cations in [4] coordination
Willemite51.1.1.2Zn2SiO4
Insular SiO4 Groups Only with all cations in octahedral [6] coordination
Forsterite51.3.1.2Mg2SiO4
Insular SiO4 Groups Only with cations in [6] and >[6] coordination
Andradite51.4.3b.1Ca3Fe3+2(SiO4)3
Group 56 - SOROSILICATES Si2O7 Groups, With Additional O, OH, F and H2O
Si2O7 Groups and O, OH, F, and H2O with cations in [4] coordination
Hemimorphite56.1.2.1Zn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
Group 65 - INOSILICATES Single-Width,Unbranched Chains,(W=1)
Single-Width Unbranched Chains, W=1 with chains P=2
Diopside65.1.3a.1CaMgSi2O6
Group 71 - PHYLLOSILICATES Sheets of Six-Membered Rings
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 2:1 layers
Muscovite71.2.2a.1KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Group 74 - PHYLLOSILICATES Modulated Layers
Modulated Layers with joined strips
Chrysocolla74.3.2.1Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Sepiolite74.3.1b.1Mg4(Si6O15)(OH)2 · 6H2O
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Andesite'-
'Dacite'-
'Dolostone'-
Kaolinite-Al2(Si2O5)(OH)4
'Lamprophyre'-
'Limestone'-
'Limonite'-(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
Muscovite
var: Sericite
-KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Natrojarosite-NaFe3(SO4)2(OH)6
'Porphyry'-
'Psilomelane'-
'Quartz-monzonite'-
'Quartzite'-
'Rhyolite'-
'Serpentine Subgroup'-D3[Si2O5](OH)4 D= Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
'Shale'-
'Siltstone'-
'Tuff'-
'Wad'-

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H AtacamiteCu2(OH)3Cl
H AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
H Beaverite-(Cu)Pb(Fe23+Cu)(SO4)2(OH)6
H BrochantiteCu4(SO4)(OH)6
H Chalcophanite(Zn,Fe,Mn)Mn3O7 · 3H2O
H ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
H FluoboriteMg3(BO3)(F,OH)3
H GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
H HemimorphiteZn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
H HydromagnesiteMg5(CO3)4(OH)2 · 4H2O
H HydroxylapatiteCa5(PO4)3(OH)
H HydrozinciteZn5(CO3)2(OH)6
H JarositeKFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
H KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
H Limonite(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
H LinaritePbCu(SO4)(OH)2
H MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
H MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
H MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H NatrojarositeNaFe3(SO4)2(OH)6
H PlumbojarositePb0.5Fe33+(SO4)2(OH)6
H SepioliteMg4(Si6O15)(OH)2 · 6H2O
H Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D= Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
H SzaibélyiteMgBO2(OH)
BBoron
B FluoboriteMg3(BO3)(F,OH)3
B LudwigiteMg2Fe3+(BO3)O2
B SzaibélyiteMgBO2(OH)
CCarbon
C AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
C CalciteCaCO3
C CerussitePbCO3
C HydromagnesiteMg5(CO3)4(OH)2 · 4H2O
C HydrozinciteZn5(CO3)2(OH)6
C MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
C PhosgenitePb2CO3Cl2
C RhodochrositeMnCO3
C SideriteFeCO3
C SmithsoniteZnCO3
OOxygen
O AndraditeCa3Fe23+(SiO4)3
O AnglesitePbSO4
O AtacamiteCu2(OH)3Cl
O AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
O BaryteBaSO4
O Beaverite-(Cu)Pb(Fe23+Cu)(SO4)2(OH)6
O BindheimitePb2Sb2O6O
O BrauniteMn2+Mn63+(SiO4)O8
O BrochantiteCu4(SO4)(OH)6
O CalciteCaCO3
O CerussitePbCO3
O Chalcophanite(Zn,Fe,Mn)Mn3O7 · 3H2O
O ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
O DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
O FerberiteFeWO4
O FluoboriteMg3(BO3)(F,OH)3
O ForsteriteMg2SiO4
O GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
O HematiteFe2O3
O HemimorphiteZn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
O HydromagnesiteMg5(CO3)4(OH)2 · 4H2O
O HydroxylapatiteCa5(PO4)3(OH)
O HydrozinciteZn5(CO3)2(OH)6
O JarositeKFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
O KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
O Limonite(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
O LinaritePbCu(SO4)(OH)2
O LudwigiteMg2Fe3+(BO3)O2
O MagnetiteFe2+Fe23+O4
O MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
O MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
O MiniumPb3O4
O MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O NatrojarositeNaFe3(SO4)2(OH)6
O PhosgenitePb2CO3Cl2
O PlumbojarositePb0.5Fe33+(SO4)2(OH)6
O PyrolusiteMn4+O2
O PyromorphitePb5(PO4)3Cl
O QuartzSiO2
O RhodochrositeMnCO3
O SepioliteMg4(Si6O15)(OH)2 · 6H2O
O Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D= Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
O SideriteFeCO3
O SmithsoniteZnCO3
O SpinelMgAl2O4
O SzaibélyiteMgBO2(OH)
O TripuhyiteFe3+Sb5+O4
O VanadinitePb5(VO4)3Cl
O WillemiteZn2SiO4
FFluorine
F FluoboriteMg3(BO3)(F,OH)3
NaSodium
Na NatrojarositeNaFe3(SO4)2(OH)6
MgMagnesium
Mg DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Mg FluoboriteMg3(BO3)(F,OH)3
Mg ForsteriteMg2SiO4
Mg HydromagnesiteMg5(CO3)4(OH)2 · 4H2O
Mg LudwigiteMg2Fe3+(BO3)O2
Mg SepioliteMg4(Si6O15)(OH)2 · 6H2O
Mg Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D= Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
Mg SpinelMgAl2O4
Mg SzaibélyiteMgBO2(OH)
AlAluminium
Al ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Al KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Al MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D= Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
Al SpinelMgAl2O4
SiSilicon
Si AndraditeCa3Fe23+(SiO4)3
Si BrauniteMn2+Mn63+(SiO4)O8
Si ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Si DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Si ForsteriteMg2SiO4
Si HemimorphiteZn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
Si KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Si MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si QuartzSiO2
Si SepioliteMg4(Si6O15)(OH)2 · 6H2O
Si Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D= Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
Si WillemiteZn2SiO4
PPhosphorus
P HydroxylapatiteCa5(PO4)3(OH)
P PyromorphitePb5(PO4)3Cl
SSulfur
S AcanthiteAg2S
S AnglesitePbSO4
S ArsenopyriteFeAsS
S BaryteBaSO4
S Beaverite-(Cu)Pb(Fe23+Cu)(SO4)2(OH)6
S BorniteCu5FeS4
S BrochantiteCu4(SO4)(OH)6
S ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
S CupropavoniteCu0.9Ag0.5Pb0.6Bi2.5S5
S GalenaPbS
S GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
S JarositeKFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
S LinaritePbCu(SO4)(OH)2
S MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
S NatrojarositeNaFe3(SO4)2(OH)6
S Pearceite[Ag9CuS4][(Ag,Cu)6(As,Sb)2S7]
S PlumbojarositePb0.5Fe33+(SO4)2(OH)6
S ProustiteAg3AsS3
S PyrargyriteAg3SbS3
S PyriteFeS2
S SphaleriteZnS
S TennantiteCu6[Cu4(Fe,Zn)2]As4S13
ClChlorine
Cl AtacamiteCu2(OH)3Cl
Cl ChlorargyriteAgCl
Cl PhosgenitePb2CO3Cl2
Cl PyromorphitePb5(PO4)3Cl
Cl VanadinitePb5(VO4)3Cl
KPotassium
K JarositeKFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
K MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
CaCalcium
Ca AndraditeCa3Fe23+(SiO4)3
Ca CalciteCaCO3
Ca DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Ca GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
Ca HydroxylapatiteCa5(PO4)3(OH)
VVanadium
V VanadinitePb5(VO4)3Cl
MnManganese
Mn BrauniteMn2+Mn63+(SiO4)O8
Mn Chalcophanite(Zn,Fe,Mn)Mn3O7 · 3H2O
Mn PyrolusiteMn4+O2
Mn RhodochrositeMnCO3
Mn Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D= Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
FeIron
Fe AndraditeCa3Fe23+(SiO4)3
Fe ArsenopyriteFeAsS
Fe Beaverite-(Cu)Pb(Fe23+Cu)(SO4)2(OH)6
Fe BorniteCu5FeS4
Fe Chalcophanite(Zn,Fe,Mn)Mn3O7 · 3H2O
Fe ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Fe FerberiteFeWO4
Fe HematiteFe2O3
Fe JarositeKFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
Fe Limonite(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
Fe LudwigiteMg2Fe3+(BO3)O2
Fe MagnetiteFe2+Fe23+O4
Fe MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
Fe NatrojarositeNaFe3(SO4)2(OH)6
Fe PlumbojarositePb0.5Fe33+(SO4)2(OH)6
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D= Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
Fe SideriteFeCO3
Fe TripuhyiteFe3+Sb5+O4
NiNickel
Ni Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D= Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
CuCopper
Cu AtacamiteCu2(OH)3Cl
Cu AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Cu Beaverite-(Cu)Pb(Fe23+Cu)(SO4)2(OH)6
Cu BorniteCu5FeS4
Cu BrochantiteCu4(SO4)(OH)6
Cu ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Cu ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Cu CupropavoniteCu0.9Ag0.5Pb0.6Bi2.5S5
Cu LinaritePbCu(SO4)(OH)2
Cu MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
Cu Pearceite[Ag9CuS4][(Ag,Cu)6(As,Sb)2S7]
Cu TennantiteCu6[Cu4(Fe,Zn)2]As4S13
ZnZinc
Zn Chalcophanite(Zn,Fe,Mn)Mn3O7 · 3H2O
Zn HemimorphiteZn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
Zn HydrozinciteZn5(CO3)2(OH)6
Zn Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D= Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
Zn SmithsoniteZnCO3
Zn SphaleriteZnS
Zn WillemiteZn2SiO4
AsArsenic
As ArsenopyriteFeAsS
As Pearceite[Ag9CuS4][(Ag,Cu)6(As,Sb)2S7]
As ProustiteAg3AsS3
As TennantiteCu6[Cu4(Fe,Zn)2]As4S13
AgSilver
Ag AcanthiteAg2S
Ag ChlorargyriteAgCl
Ag CupropavoniteCu0.9Ag0.5Pb0.6Bi2.5S5
Ag Pearceite[Ag9CuS4][(Ag,Cu)6(As,Sb)2S7]
Ag ProustiteAg3AsS3
Ag PyrargyriteAg3SbS3
Ag SilverAg
SbAntimony
Sb AntimonySb
Sb BindheimitePb2Sb2O6O
Sb Pearceite[Ag9CuS4][(Ag,Cu)6(As,Sb)2S7]
Sb PyrargyriteAg3SbS3
Sb TripuhyiteFe3+Sb5+O4
BaBarium
Ba BaryteBaSO4
WTungsten
W FerberiteFeWO4
AuGold
Au GoldAu
PbLead
Pb AnglesitePbSO4
Pb Beaverite-(Cu)Pb(Fe23+Cu)(SO4)2(OH)6
Pb BindheimitePb2Sb2O6O
Pb CerussitePbCO3
Pb CupropavoniteCu0.9Ag0.5Pb0.6Bi2.5S5
Pb GalenaPbS
Pb LinaritePbCu(SO4)(OH)2
Pb MiniumPb3O4
Pb PhosgenitePb2CO3Cl2
Pb PlumbojarositePb0.5Fe33+(SO4)2(OH)6
Pb PyromorphitePb5(PO4)3Cl
Pb VanadinitePb5(VO4)3Cl
BiBismuth
Bi CupropavoniteCu0.9Ag0.5Pb0.6Bi2.5S5

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Pack, F. J. (1906), Geology of Pioche, Nevada, and Vicinity: Nevada School of Mines Quarterly: 27(3&4): 281-333.
Hill, J. M. (1916), Notes on some Mining Districts in E. Nevada: USGS Bulletin 648: 124-137.
Anderson, J. C. (1922), Ore Deposits of Pioche District: Engineering & Mining Journal: 113: 279-85.
Lincoln, F. C. (1923), Mining Districts and Mineral Resources of Nevada: Reno, Nevada Newsletter Publishing Company: 125-129.
Westgate, L. G., Knopf, Adolph (1932), Geology and ore deposits of the Pioche district, Nevada. USGS Professional Paper 171, 79 pp.
Koschmann, A.H. and Bergendahl, M.H. (1968), Principal Gold Producing Districts of the U.S., USGS Professional Paper 610.
Tschanz, C. M. and Pampeyan, E. E. (1970), Geology and Mineral Deposits of Lincoln County, Nevada: Nevada Bureau of Mines Bulletin 73: 125-129.
James, L.P., and Knight, L.H. (1979), Stratabound lead-zinc-silver ores of the Pioche District, Nevada - Unusual "Mississippi Valley" Deposits; in RMAG-UGA 1979 Basin and Range Symposium proceedings.
Long, K.R., DeYoung, J.H., Jr., and Ludington, S.D. (1998), Database of significant deposits of gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc in the United States; Part A, Database description and analysis; part B, Digital database: USGS Open-File Report 98-206, 33 p., one 3.5 inch diskette.
State of Nevada Interagency Abandoned Mine Land Environmental Task Force (IAMLET) (1999), report. [http://www.nv.blm.gov/AML/IAMLETreport.htm].
USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310394 & 60001661.
Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, MI-80.

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