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Gillette Quarry (J-J Mine; Haddam Neck Quarry), Haddam Neck, Haddam, Middlesex Co., Connecticut, USAi
Regional Level Types
Gillette Quarry (J-J Mine; Haddam Neck Quarry)Quarry
Haddam Neck- not defined -
Haddam- not defined -
Middlesex Co.County
ConnecticutState
USACountry

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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 41° 29' 33'' North , 72° 30' 39'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 41.49250,-72.51083
GeoHash:G#: drkkjcrpr
Locality type:Quarry
Köppen climate type:Cfa : Humid subtropical climate


The Gillette Quarry operated intermittently between 1895 and 1944. The quarry is named after its first owner, Merit P. Gillette, who opened the quarry in the fall of 1895 and found the first elbaite crystals on December 1 (Davis, 1901). The quarry was eventually worked for gem tourmaline, mineral specimens and commercial grade feldspar. According to a newspaper article (Anonymous, 1932), beginning in 1904 the quarry was leased to the Eureka Mining and Operating Company of Trenton, NJ and produced up to 65 tons of feldspar a day for about 12 years. Cameron et al (1954) says it was closed by 1914 (some references from around that time call it the "Haddam Neck Quarry") but says it was worked again for three months in 1934 by B. E. Johnson of Haddam. A newspaper article (Anonymous, 1932) from December 23, 1932 says the Sterling Gillette was reopening the quarry and that the feldspar was being sent to Bon Ami in Manchester, Conn. It also notes that "New machinery is being installed by Mr. Gillette for the grinding of feldspar at the old plant of the Tidewater Feldspar Company [at Rock Landing], now owned by Mr. Worth of Middletown." Cameron et al (1954) notes that the last operations were by B. E. Johnson of Haddam and E. H. Johnson of Middletown (as the "J-J Mine") from November 1942 to November 1944. It has been idle since then. Contrary to some photo descriptions, it has not been lost to development. It is on the same private residential property it has always been on, but it is not open to collecting.

When it was opened, in the eastern USA only the pegmatites of Maine produced pocket elbaite crystals, so the abundant elbaite crystals from Gillette soon found their way into museums world-wide. They were systematically mined from 1898 to at least 1901 by Ernest Schernikow of New York City, who would happily give permits for others to collect (Davis, 1901). Horace Williams worked there and sold many crystals to George English, whom he later worked for. Anonymous (1932) states that M. P. Gillette gave a collection of about 300 crystals to Wesleyan University and that Yale Peabody Museum obtained much material. Gem material was purchased by George F. Kunz, Director of the US Bureau of Mines and purchasing agent for the Tiffany Company of NYC. John Pierpont Morgan obtained a large collection of material from Gillette that is now housed at the American Museum of Natural History in NYC.

According to Scovil (1992):

The workings consist of two open crosscuts leading to a very irregular open cut 108 meters long. These cuts expose a complex pegmatite consisting primarily of steeply dipping, interconnecting lenses that strike N 35° W. The pegmatite is exposed along its strike for about 100 meters, and varies in thickness from 5 to 25 meters. The walls of the pegmatite are characterized by irregular rolls or ridges most of which plunge gently north, and by sharp bends that are related to joints.


The pegmatite is complexly zoned and is lithium-bearing. Miarolitic pockets are most prevalent in the western cut. According to Sterling Gillette (1937) pocket size varied:

from that of an egg or less up to a barrel or larger. The pockets were formed with an inside lining of quartz crystals and were usually about half full of decomposed rock formation. Always wet, the minerals found in the pockets were standing on end and unattached to any matrix. In some pockets there were found as many as 600 crystals of tourmaline ranging in size from that of a needle to that of a pencil or larger.


Davis (1901) provides an early and comprehensive description of the elbaite crystals:

Occurring in the granite at irregular places, cavities are encountered lined generally with quartz and albite crystals, on which the tourmalines are found. To enumerate their colors would simply be to mention the range of the spectrum. Green predominates, from lightest shade to the darkest. Pink comes next, then yellow, white, blue, etc.

The largest crystal found was pale green, of uniform color, and about ten inches long, 1 inch thick at the base, tapering to about three-quarters of an inch. A few crystals have been found nearly two inches in diameter, and from that size, down to the diameter of a hair.

One crystal was green, eight inches long, doubly terminated, and yellow at one end. Another green, six, inches long, doubly terminated, and 1 1/2 inches thick. Another three inches long, 1 inches thick, half its length green, and the other terminated end a deep pink.

One seven inches long, less than 1/8 inch thick (about like a darning needle), of clear light green color. Several good sized green crystals, with both terminations pink, and also several yellow at one end and blue at the other.

One crystal showed five colors, white, pink, yellow, green and blue. Crystals observed of single or combined colors were: white; white and pink; green, yellow, blue green; green with terminations of pink, yellow and blue; white and blue; yellow with terminations of pink; green and white (one crystal having both terminations white; pink; pink with termination of white; green with dark blue termination.

The colors mentioned vary from light to dark. Usually these combinations are well defined with sharp lines of demarcation, each color running part of the length of the crystal. In other instances the colors blend so softly that it is impossible to distinguish where the one ends and the other begins. Then again the different colors run parallel with the prism, as shown by cross sections that have been cut.

Professor Penfield says that the variation of colors are due to the varying quantities of magnesia and iron. Better than any possible description are the crystals themselves. Unfortunately most of the crystals are broken in blasting, often so badly as to be beyond repair. Yet withal, considering the force needed to break the rock, they are fortunate to get so many that lose so little of their beauty in restoration.

A glance at the crystals would lead one to think that quite large gems might be cut from them. This is not so, however, for they have not been able to get any perfect gems over one carat of weight. One very interesting and new effect has been observed in cutting some of the pieces en-cabachon. That is, a perfect cat’s-eye, equal to the famous chrysoberyl cat’s-eye from Ceylon.


The quarry also is noted for a unique, pink, fibrous variety of muscovite called schernikite, usually forming parallel overgrowths on lepidolite and normal muscovite or as long, rhombic fibers coating and penetrating pocket crystals. Other noteworthy minerals are morganite overgrowths on cores of pale green beryl, often doubly-terminated by pinacoids and modified by pyramidal faces; amazonite; purple masses of lepidolite; euhedral gem fluorapatite; microlite; and topaz.

The wall rock consists of interbedded quartz-mica schist, mica-quartzite, calc-silicate gneiss and marble and minerals found there are included in the list below.

Cameron and others (1954) describes the zoning in the eastern and western portions of the pegmatite:

Western part. - The sequence of zones inward from the walls, is as follows:
1. Border zone, ½ inch to 18 inches thick, composed of fine-grained quartz, [albite] plagioclase, muscovite, garnet and black tourmaline. The zone is present wherever the contact between pegmatite and wall rock is visible.
2. Wall-zone, sheet-mica bearing, ½ foot to 6 feet thick, composed chiefly of quartz and plagioclase with subordinate [microcline] perthite and muscovite and accessory green apatite and black tourmaline. Muscovite probably constitutes less than 5 percent of the zone. The unit is discontinuous and its distribution is best indicated by the geologic map.
3. Perthite-quartz zone, 10 to 45 feet thick, composed of white and salmon-pink perthite, pale green milky quartz, and graphic granite, with subordinate plagioclase and green muscovite (mostly books ¼ to 1 inch across), and accessory black tourmaline, green and rose beryl, red fluorite, apatite and lepidolite. Some of the quartz is granular (grain size ¼ inch) and occurs in branching, vein-like bodies which may have replaced other minerals of the zone. Albite, green tourmaline, green fluorescent apatite and green muscovite flakes are associated chiefly with the granular quartz. Cavities, 1 to 5 inches broad, are common only in this material. The cavities are lined with euhedral muscovite, albite and quartz crystals. At point A, several books of scrap muscovite, 1 inch broad and 5 inches thick, occur in a mass of granular quartz.

Eastern part. - The walls of this part of the pegmatite in this area are characterized by deep rolls in places, especially northward from point D. The sequence of zones in this part of the pegmatite, inward from the walls, is as follows:

1. Border zone, ½ inch to 10 inches thick, similar to border zone in the western part of the pegmatite.
2. Quartz-plagioclase-perthite wall zone, 4 to 6 feet thick, composed of coarse-grained quartz, perthite and massive plagioclase with subordinate cleavelandite, black, green, and pink tourmaline, scrap muscovite and traces of pink lepidolite (some of the variety schernikite), pale green apatite, red fluorite, and green and rose beryl. The subordinate minerals commonly occur together in irregular masses in which are numerous small cavities. The unit is present for about 30 feet northward from point D. The zone was covered by water at the time of latest mapping.
3. Intermediate zone, sheet-mica bearing, 2 to 6 feet thick. This consists of quartz, plagioclase, perthite and muscovite with accessory garnet, black tourmaline and green apatite. The hanging wall part has an average thickness of 4 feet, and is more uniform in thickness and richer in mica than the footwall part. The zone is very lean along both walls of the pegmatite at the southern end of the quarry.
4. Quartz-plagioclase-perthite intermediate zone, 3 to 5 feet thick, composed of coarse quartz, subordinate plagioclase and perthite, and accessory black tourmaline and muscovite (books 1 inch broad). This zone is exposed only in the southernmost face of the cut, where it lies adjacent to both parts of the wall-zone.
5. Perthite-quartz intermediate zone, 4 to 20 feet thick, similar to the perthite-quartz zone of the western part but with less graphic granite and less granular quartz and associated minerals. Perthite occurs in larger masses; some are nearly pure anhedral crystals 5 feet long.
6. Quartz-perthite core, maximum thickness about 35 feet. About 85 percent of the unit consists of granular milky quartz (1/8 to 1 inch grains): coarse-grained (crystals 5 inches to 4 feet in diameter) white to pink perthite anhedra make up almost 10 percent. Green muscovite (books ¼ to 1/8 inch broad), black tourmaline, pale green apatite, and red fluorite make up the remainder of the zone. The margins of some of the perthite masses have replaced quartz and the minor minerals. No evidence could found, however, to indicate whether replacement occurred on a large scale at the expense of pre-existing pegmatite, or was merely a minor process in the development of the core.



Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


42 valid minerals. 1 (FRL) - first recorded locality of unapproved mineral/variety/etc. 3 erroneous literature entries.

Detailed Mineral List:

Actinolite
Formula: ☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Colour: dark green
Description: With vesuvianite and other calc-silicate minerals in a vein in the gneissic wall rock. Found by Schooner in 1953 and 1954.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Albite
Formula: Na(AlSi3O8)
Habit: either flattened parallel to b {010} or elongated parallel to x {bar101}, and aggregated in parallel or twin-position to form a group which presents the aspect of a large crystal elongated in the direction of the axis b.
Colour: colorless to white
Description: A major component of the pegmatite, but also lining miarolitic cavities with clear, colorless to white, well-developed crystals to 2.5 cm in diameter, sometimes displaying a beautiful opalescence (Scovil, 1992).
Reference: Mineralogical Magazine 1902 13 : 97-121.; USGS Prof Paper 255; Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
Albite var: Cleavelandite
Formula: Na(AlSi3O8)
Habit: tabular
Colour: white to colorless
Description: Significant component of the pegmatite. Excellent crystals, an inch or more in diameter, have come from cavities.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough); Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255.
Albite var: Oligoclase ?
Formula: (Na,Ca)[Al(Si,Al)Si2O8]
Description: Included in a list of minerals with no supporting documentation, may have been included because of the opalescence of some pocket albite. Pegmatitic core albite tends to be more pure (less than An5) than the oligoclase compositional range (An10-30), though it may reach it along the wall or border zones; also common in the regional metamorphic rocks.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Almandine
Formula: Fe2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Habit: trapezohedra, sometimes flattened, with dodecahedral modifications
Colour: maroon
Description: crystals to 1 cm, and occasionally gemmy, flattened crystals in muscovite books
Reference: Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
Annite
Formula: KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Habit: tabular
Colour: black
Description: fka biotite, a very rare accessory in the pegmatite
Reference: Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
'Axinite Group' ?
Description: Included in a list copied from Schooner (1958) but with no supporting details. May have occurred in the calc-silicate vein found in the gneissic wall rock.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State
Beryl
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Habit: elongated hexagonal prisms, terminated with pinacoids and partial pyramids {11bar21}
Colour: yellow, peach, pale green, pink overgrowths on pale green cores, aqua, colorless
Fluorescence: blue-white
Description: Crystals to 2 feet (60 cm) across have been found. Most typical are colorless to pale green or pink overgrowths on pale green cored ("reverse watermelon") crystals, usually less than 15 cm long. Commonly frozen in quartz and associated with fluorapatite, cleavelandite, elbaite. Pocket crystals rare.
Reference: Mineralogical Magazine 1902 13 : 97-121.; USGS Prof Paper 255; Rocks & Minerals (1995) 70:396-409; Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough); Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
Beryl var: Aquamarine
Formula: Be3Al2Si6O18
Habit: hexagonal prisms
Colour: pale blue
Description: Subordinate in quantity to the typical pale green and pink beryl, but gem quality crystals were found and cut. Some highly etched crystals also exist.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough); Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
Beryl var: Goshenite
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Habit: elongated hexagonal prisms, terminated with pinacoids and partial pyramids {11bar21}
Colour: colorless
Fluorescence: blue-white
Description: Beryl crystals to 2 feet (60 cm) across have been found. Crystals usually less than 15 cm long. In large crystals, color grades from colorless to rose externally with pale green cores. Commonly frozen in quartz and associated with fluorapatite, cleavelandite, elbaite. Some gem material in smaller crystals from pockets.
Reference: Harvard Mineralogical Museum; Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.); Harold Moritz collection.
Beryl var: Morganite
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Habit: elongated hexagonal prisms, terminated with pinacoids and partial pyramids {11bar21}
Colour: pink, commonly with green cores
Description: Beryl crystals to 2 feet (60 cm) across have been found. Crystals usually less than 15 cm long. Color zoning in large crystals typically consists of colorless to rose externally, with pale green cores. Commonly frozen in quartz and associated with fluorapatite, cleavelandite, elbaite. Some pocket gem material.
Reference: Mineralogical Magazine 1902 13 : 97-121.; USGS Prof Paper 255; Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough); Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Habit: short hexagonal prisms with rhombohedral terminations
Colour: brown-gray
Description: Euhedral crystals less than 1 cm on smoky quartz from a pocket, also in the calc-silicate vein with vesuvianite in a vein in the wall rock.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough); Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
Cassiterite
Formula: SnO2
Colour: dark brownish black
Description: good crystals to 1 cm, can be highly modified, lustrous, microcrystals in cleavelandite
Reference: Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.); Rocks & Minerals (1995) 70:396-409
Chalcopyrite
Formula: CuFeS2
Habit: anhedral
Colour: iridescent
Description: Micro grains in albite.
Reference: Harold Moritz collection
Chrysoberyl
Formula: BeAl2O4
Description: Actually from the Chrysoberyl locality (Harold Moritz info).
Reference: Rocks and Minerals, (1999) 74:324-327
Columbite-(Fe)
Formula: Fe2+Nb2O6
Habit: elongated tabular prisms
Colour: black with iridescence
Description: Well-formed iridescent crystals to 2 cm long, usually enclosed in microcline. The identification was made by Petr Cerny at the University of Manitoba, using microprobe analysis (Scovil 1992).
Reference: Mineralogical Record 23:19-28,80; Mineralogical Magazine 1902 13 : 97-121.
Cookeite
Formula: (Al2Li)Al2(AlSi3O10)(OH)8
Habit: globular masses of radial hexagonal plates
Colour: yellowish-white
Fluorescence: yellow
Description: Globules typically a few mm across, encrusting pocket albite, smoky quartz, microcline, lepidolite, elbaite terminations. When naturally removed, leave hemispherical pits on quartz crystal surfaces.
Reference: Mineralogical Record 23:19-28,80; Mineralogical Magazine 1902 13 : 97-121.; Rocks & Minerals (1995) 70:396-409; Earl Ingerson. American Mineralogist, Vol. 23, No. 4, April 1938, pp. 269-276
Diopside
Formula: CaMgSi2O6
Colour: light green
Description: With other calc-silicate minerals in a vein in the gneissic wall rock. Found by Schooner in 1953 and 1954.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Dolomite
Formula: CaMg(CO3)2
Habit: massive
Colour: white, green to black
Description: With the calc-silicate vein found in the wall rock in 1953-4 by Dick Schooner.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Elbaite
Formula: Na(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Habit: Elongated trigonal prisms, antilogous pole terminated with rhombohedral pyramids {1bar11}, analgous pole dominated by a pedion.
Colour: prisms mostly green, blue-green, rarely pink. Terms. green, yellow, pink, blue, combinations
Description: Hundreds of crystals in some pockets, often "piercing" smoky quartz. Flawless crystals are rare; usually fractured. Large pocket crystals vary but are usually striated to silky, slender and elongated, from small needles up to 30 cm, but typically a few cm long. Color zoning is usually longitudinal, short and terminal in shades of green, pink, golden yellow and blue with up to 5 colors. Antilogous poles typically pale green, yellow, pink; analogous poles usually colorless, pale green, aqua. w/thin indigo cap, or sometimes with a narrow pale colored zone immediately beneath and parallel to the pedion. Tiny crystals may be any color throughout. Concentric “watermelon” zoning is not common. Some fragments of green prisms are overgrown by later pink zones. Also found frozen in matrix with beryl, fluorapatite, fluorite, muscovite, smoky quartz, lepidolite, microlite, columbite.
Reference: Davis, James W. (1901): The Minerals of Haddam, Conn. Mineral Collector, v. 8, no. 4, pp. 50-54, and no. 5, pp. 65-70.; Bowman, H. L. (1902): On an Occurrence of Minerals at Haddam Neck, Connecticut, USA. Mineralogical Magazine, 13 (no. 60), 97-22.; Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
Fluorapatite
Formula: Ca5(PO4)3F
Habit: short hexagonal prisms or tabular, terminated by pinacoids with modified edges
Colour: pale gray-green or rose pink to purple
Fluorescence: bright yellow
Description: Gray-green opaque crystals up to 2 cm common in quartz, albite, beryl, elbaite, lepidolite matrix. Translucent to clear crystals in pockets, either as stout hexagonal prisms or with a central fluorescent prism surrounded by tapered, non-fluorescent overgrowths up to a few cm across. Gray-green crystals show more forms than the rose pink to purple crystals.
Reference: Mineralogical Magazine 1902 13 : 97-121.; Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.); Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255.
Fluorite
Formula: CaF2
Habit: massive to crude octahedra
Colour: red, colorless, green
Fluorescence: dull green
Description: massive or crude red crystals to 4 cm, associated with fluorapatite, and lithian muscovite, was frequently found in the eastern quartz-plagioclase-perthite zone. Also, colorless fluorite accompanies diopside and vesuvianite in the calc-silicate vein in the wall rock. Schooner reports little green crystals in vugs of albite.
Reference: Mineralogical Magazine 1902 13 : 97-121.; USGS Prof Paper 255; Rocks & Minerals (1995) 70:396-409; Earl Ingerson. American Mineralogist, Vol. 23, No. 4, April 1938, pp. 269-276; Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough); Scovil (1992)
Fluorite var: Chlorophane
Formula: CaF2
Habit: massive to octahedral
Colour: cherry red to maroon
Fluorescence: blue-green
Description: Usually found as fragments due to cleavage and brittle nature, sometimes as remnants in octahedral voids in matrix.
Reference: Richard Schooner collection
Goethite
Formula: α-Fe3+O(OH)
Habit: stains and crusts
Colour: brown
Description: As iron oxidation stains referred to as "limonite".
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough); Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255.
Graphite
Formula: C
Habit: coatings, blebs
Colour: dark gray
Description: as thin seams and little rounded crystals in marginal pegmatite; as poorly developed crystals and thin irregular fracture fillings; as millimeter-sized blebs with a radiating structure on a matrix of feldspar and quartz
Reference: Rocks & Minerals (1995) 70:396-409; Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.); Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Grossular ?
Formula: Ca3Al2(SiO4)3
Description: Included in a list of minerals with no supporting details. May occur in the calc-silicate gneiss surrounding parts of the pegmatite.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Gypsum
Formula: CaSO4 · 2H2O
Habit: clusters of micro crystals
Colour: white to gray
Description: As clusters of very delicate white or gray crystals on protected ledges of schist and gneiss, formed from the oxidation of sulfides in these rocks surrounding the pegmatite.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough); Rocks & Minerals (1995) 70:396-409
Hematite
Formula: Fe2O3
Habit: pseudo-hexagonal
Colour: brown
Description: as brown pseudo-hexagonal inclusions in muscovite, often producing fascinating patterns
Reference: Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
Kyanite ?
Formula: Al2(SiO4)O
Description: Included in a list of minerals with no supporting details. May occur in the metamorphic rocks hosting the pegmatite.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
'Lepidolite'
Habit: pseudo-hexagonal crystals, granular
Colour: purple
Description: As distinct crystals, up to 10 cm across; as overgrowths on a core of green muscovite and in turn overgrown by parallel schernikite fibers - all cleavable as one unit. As peach-blossom red crystals, often penetrated by elbaite. Fine-grained, granular masses in matrix with smoky quartz, cleavelandite, elbatite, beryl, fluorapatite.
Reference: Mineralogical Magazine 1902 13 : 97-121.; Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255; Rocks & Minerals (1995) 70:396-409; Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough); Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
Magnetite
Formula: Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Habit: octahedral
Colour: black
Description: as flattened inclusions in muscovite and as sharp octahedra to 1.5 cm
Reference: Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
Microcline
Formula: K(AlSi3O8)
Habit: blocky to prismatic
Colour: white and salmon-pink
Fluorescence: bluish-white
Description: Crystals in cavities reach 20 cm or more across, and up to 120 cm across as crude crystals in the core. One large crystal was presented to the American Museum of Natural History, NYC by E. Schernikow. As "perthite", a major component of the pegmatite in general.
Reference: Davis, James W. (1901): The Minerals of Haddam, Conn. Mineral Collector, v. 8, no. 4, pp. 50-54, and no. 5, pp. 65-70.; Mineralogical Magazine 1902 13 : 97-121.; Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255; Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.); Stugard, Frederick, Jr. (1958) PEGMATITES OF THE MIDDLETOWN AREA, CONNECTICUT. USGS Bulletin 1042-Q.
Microcline var: Amazonite
Formula: K(AlSi3O8)
Habit: blocky to prismatic
Colour: pale lime-green to blue-green
Description: American Museum of Natural History collection contains a pale blue-green microcline crystal 20 cm across.
Reference: Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
'Microlite Group'
Formula: A2-mTa2X6-wZ-n
Habit: modified octahedra
Colour: brown to black
Description: Crystals up to 1.1 cm, resinous, some are radioactive and surrounded by dark halos, associated with dark smoky quartz, sharp little crystals of muscovite, acicular green tourmaline, beryl, fluorite, cleavelandite.
Reference: Seaman, 1976. Pegmatite Minerals of the World; Mineralogical Magazine 1902 13 : 97-121.; Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.); Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Molybdenite ?
Formula: MoS2
Description: Included in a list of minerals with no supporting documentation. Does occur in small pegmatites in the area, though, so plausible.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Montmorillonite ?
Formula: (Na,Ca)0.33(Al,Mg)2(Si4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
Colour: white (stained brown)
Description: Pocket clay that Schooner (1958) speculates is montmorillonite. David London's 2008 book "Pegmatites" points out that miarolitic pocket clays are poorly studied, but in at least the San Diego Co. area of California includes montmorillonite plus several other species.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Muscovite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Habit: pseudo-hexagonal tabular
Colour: silvery-white to greenish
Description: A major accessory of the pegmatite in general, in books up to 45 cm in diameter and 20 cm thick. Books often contain beautiful inclusions of green elbaite and black schorl, as well as hexagonal hematite platelets and flattened magnetite octahedra. Some muscovite crystals are surrounded by overgrowths of lepidolite and schernikite that cleave as a single unit.
Reference: Mineralogical Magazine 1902 13 : 97-121.; Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.); Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255.
Muscovite var: Schernikite (FRL)
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Type Locality:
Habit: Rhombic fibers in parallel or twin-position
Colour: white, tan, pink
Description: A variety of pink fibrous muscovite so far unique to Gillette, as described by Scovil (1992): "Bowman (1902) goes into great detail in his analysis of muscovite and lepidolite from Gillette. The two form interesting overgrowths, with pale green muscovite at the center. This core is surrounded by a sharply defined zone of pink lepidolite. The lepidolite was subsequently overgrown by pink fibrous muscovite. The fibers are rhombic in cross section and are in parallel or twin-position so that the mass can be cleaved as if a single crystal...The fibrous muscovite also occurs as inclusions in quartz crystals. The muscovite starts at a pin point in the quartz crystals interior and becomes a divergent sub-parallel bundle of fibers as it reaches the surface where it is often the preferred site for a cookeite hemisphere."
Reference: Bowman, H. L. (1902) ON AN OCCURRENCE OF MINERALS AT HADDAM NECK, CONNECTICUT, USA. Mineralogical Magazine, 13 (no. 60), 97—122; DS Martin (1912) Annals New York Academy Science 21:189; Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
Orthoclase
Formula: K(AlSi3O8)
Description: "The single specimen at Yale described by Scovil (1992) from the old Brush collection was labeled before results reported by Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255 and Stugard (1958) Pegmatites of the Middletown Area, Connecticut USGS Bulletin 1042-Q, that show the K-feldspar of the Middletown pegmatite district to be microcline." (Harold Moritz information)
Reference: Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
Phlogopite ?
Formula: KMg3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Description: Included in a list of minerals with no supporting information. May occur in the calc-silicate gneiss surrounding part of the pegmatite.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Pyrite ?
Formula: FeS2
Description: found rarely as small crystals and masses often altered to “limonite”
Reference: Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
'Pyrochlore Group'
Formula: A2Nb2(O,OH)6Z
Description: Included in a list of minerals with no supporting information.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Pyrolusite
Formula: Mn4+O2
Description: No pyrolusite dendrite or staining in a granite pegmatite in the world has been verified as pyrolusite. The name was a mistake in the nineteenth century which has been widely publicized.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Pyrrhotite
Formula: Fe7S8
Description: Schooner (1958) reports "one distinct little crystal"
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Habit: massive
Colour: white to colorless
Description: Major component of the pegmatite in general, though most of it is the smoky variety, especially the pocket crystals.
Reference: Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.); Mineralogical Magazine 1902 13 : 97-121.; Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255.
Quartz var: Rose Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Habit: massive
Colour: pink
Reference: Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
Quartz var: Smoky Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Habit: hexagonal prisms with rhombohedral terminations, sometimes flattened or etched, or oddly shaped overgrowths on earlier fragments
Colour: pale gray to black, brown
Description: Besides being a major component of the pegmatite matrix in general, where it is massive, it is abundant in miarolitic cavities as euhedral crystals. Some show phantoms or inclusions of schernikite fibers and elbaite and some are encrusted with cookeite blebs or show surface pit scars where cookeite was naturally removed. One 1.8-meter pocket contained nothing but jet-black smoky quartz crystals up to 14 cm in length. Etched crystals or oddly-shaped overgrowths on earlier fragments of quartz also known. Beautiful, doubly terminated crystals are often penetrated by elbaite. "One of these crystals, very flat and with several tourmalines inclosed, was worn as a watch-charm by the son of M. P. Gillette. This crystal in its natural state has as fine a polish as though it had just come from the lapidary's hand." (Davis, 1901).
Reference: Davis, James W. (1901): The Minerals of Haddam, Conn. Mineral Collector, v. 8, no. 4, pp. 50-54, and no. 5, pp. 65-70.; Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.); Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Scheelite
Formula: Ca(WO4)
Fluorescence: blue-white
Description: minute grains in quartz-tourmaline matrix; an incomplete one inch white crystal at the Gillette Quarry in Haddam Neck; small masses are scattered through the vesuvianite and quartz in the calc-silicate vein in the wall rock.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough); Scovil (1992)
Schorl
Formula: Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Habit: elongated trigonal prisms, typically poorly terminated
Colour: black
Description: Common accessory mineral frozen in pegmatite matrix, can be near but is not in miarolitic pockets, though it can grade into elbaite.
Reference: Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.); Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255.
Sillimanite ?
Formula: Al2(SiO4)O
Description: Included in a list of minerals with no supporting documentation. Has been found in area metamorphic rocks.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Spessartine ?
Formula: Mn2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Description: Included in a list of minerals with no supporting documentation. Most garnet in this pegmatite district is almandine.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Sphalerite
Formula: ZnS
Description: "observed with limonite and black tourmaline" Schooner (1958)
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Spodumene ?
Formula: LiAlSi2O6
Description: Given the absence of common spodumene crystals, the casually reported gemstones of the pink variety kunzite could simply have been morganite beryl; and a waxy butterscotch colored purported spodumene crystal measuring 1.5 x 2.0 x 5.0 cm altered to “pinite” is likely a muscovite pseudomorph after topaz, which are documented and in this size range.
Reference: Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.); Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
'Tantalite' ?
Formula: (Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
Description: Januzzi (1976) merely stated: "Although tantalite has not been officially reported from western Connecticut, it undoubtedly occurs at some of the localities listed for columbite." Schooner (1959) included it in his list of minerals but gave no supporting information.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State; Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Titanite
Formula: CaTi(SiO4)O
Description: "A few very lean examples" Schooner (1958), probably from the surrounding metamorphic rocks.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough).
Topaz
Formula: Al2(SiO4)(F,OH)2
Habit: equant or flattened with multiple terminal forms
Colour: colorless to pale blue, orange (altered)
Description: First found in the mid-1950s and so often unrecognized in earlier collections, topaz occurs rarely as equant, rhombic cross-section crystals up to 1 cm in the cavities or more commonly up to 5.6 cm embedded in quartz-albite-muscovite matrix. Greasy, orange-brown crystals are partially or wholly altered to muscovite and were earlier mistaken for "pinite" pseudomorphs after spodumene.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough); Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
'Tourmaline'
Formula: A(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
Habit: elongated, striated, trigonal prisms capped by pinacoids or rhombohedra
Colour: black to green, rarely pink to colorless, with yellow, pink, pale green, blue terminations
Description: See comments under elbaite and schorl.
Reference: Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.); Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough); Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255; Bowman, H. L. (1902) ON AN OCCURRENCE OF MINERALS AT HADDAM NECK, CONNECTICUT, USA. Mineralogical Magazine, 13 (no. 60), 97—122.
'Tourmaline var: Achroite'
Formula: A(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
Reference: P Cristofono collection
Uraninite ?
Formula: UO2
Description: Included in mineral lists but with no documentation. Plausible as it occurs in area pegmatites.
Reference: Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
Uranophane
Formula: Ca(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
Habit: acicular micros
Colour: lemon-yellow
Description: "rarely as small (to 1 mm) lemon-yellow acicular crystals" Scovil (1992)
Reference: Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992): Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. (Mineralogical Record, 23(1):19-28.)
Vesuvianite
Formula: (Ca,Na,☐)19(Al,Mg,Fe3+)13(☐,B,Al,Fe3+)5(Si2O7)4(SiO4)10(OH,F,O)10
Habit: columnar aggregates of striated elongate crystals
Colour: light brown
Description: With other calc-silicate minerals in a vein in the gneissic wall rock. Found by Schooner in 1953 and 1954. Confirmed by an x-ray diffraction test made by Mary E. Mrose of the U. S. Geological Survey. The largest specimen was six inches in length and half as wide.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958) THE MINERALOGY OF THE PORTLAND-EAST HAMPTON-MIDDLETOWN-HADDAM AREA IN CONNECTICUT (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough); Rocks & Min.: 70:402; Rocks & Minerals (1995) 70:396-409

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 1 - Elements
Graphite1.CB.05aC
Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Chalcopyrite2.CB.10aCuFeS2
Molybdenite ?2.EA.30MoS2
Pyrite ?2.EB.05aFeS2
Pyrrhotite2.CC.10Fe7S8
Sphalerite2.CB.05aZnS
Group 3 - Halides
Fluorite3.AB.25CaF2
var: Chlorophane3.AB.25CaF2
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Cassiterite4.DB.05SnO2
Chrysoberyl ?4.BA.05BeAl2O4
Columbite-(Fe)4.DB.35Fe2+Nb2O6
Goethite4.00.α-Fe3+O(OH)
Hematite4.CB.05Fe2O3
Magnetite4.BB.05Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Microlite Group4.00.A2-mTa2X6-wZ-n
Pyrochlore Group ?4.00.A2Nb2(O,OH)6Z
Pyrolusite ?4.DB.05Mn4+O2
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
var: Rose Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
var: Smoky Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Uraninite ?4.DL.05UO2
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Calcite5.AB.05CaCO3
Dolomite5.AB.10CaMg(CO3)2
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
Gypsum7.CD.40CaSO4 · 2H2O
Scheelite7.GA.05Ca(WO4)
Group 8 - Phosphates, Arsenates and Vanadates
Fluorapatite8.BN.05Ca5(PO4)3F
Group 9 - Silicates
'Actinolite'9.DE.10☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
'Albite'9.FA.35Na(AlSi3O8)
var: Cleavelandite9.FA.35Na(AlSi3O8)
var: Oligoclase ?9.FA.35(Na,Ca)[Al(Si,Al)Si2O8]
'Almandine'9.AD.25Fe2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Annite9.EC.20KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Beryl9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
var: Aquamarine9.CJ.05Be3Al2Si6O18
var: Goshenite9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
var: Morganite9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Cookeite9.EC.55(Al2Li)Al2(AlSi3O10)(OH)8
Diopside9.DA.15CaMgSi2O6
Elbaite9.CK.05Na(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Grossular ?9.AD.25Ca3Al2(SiO4)3
Kyanite ?9.AF.15Al2(SiO4)O
Microcline9.FA.30K(AlSi3O8)
var: Amazonite9.FA.30K(AlSi3O8)
Montmorillonite ?9.EC.40(Na,Ca)0.33(Al,Mg)2(Si4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
Muscovite9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
var: Schernikite (TL)9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Orthoclase9.FA.30K(AlSi3O8)
Phlogopite ?9.EC.20KMg3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Schorl9.CK.05Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Sillimanite ?9.AF.05Al2(SiO4)O
Spessartine ?9.AD.25Mn2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Spodumene ?9.DA.30LiAlSi2O6
Titanite9.AG.15CaTi(SiO4)O
Topaz9.AF.35Al2(SiO4)(F,OH)2
Uranophane9.AK.15Ca(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
Vesuvianite9.BG.35(Ca,Na,☐)19(Al,Mg,Fe3+)13(☐,B,Al,Fe3+)5(Si2O7)4(SiO4)10(OH,F,O)10
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
Axinite Group ?-
Lepidolite-
Tantalite ?-(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
Tourmaline-A(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
'var: Achroite'-A(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 1 - NATIVE ELEMENTS AND ALLOYS
Semi-metals and non-metals
Graphite1.3.6.2C
Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Pyrrhotite2.8.10.1Fe7S8
Sphalerite2.8.2.1ZnS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:1
Chalcopyrite2.9.1.1CuFeS2
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Molybdenite ?2.12.10.1MoS2
Pyrite ?2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
A2X3
Hematite4.3.1.2Fe2O3
AX2
Cassiterite4.4.1.5SnO2
Pyrolusite ?4.4.1.4Mn4+O2
Group 5 - OXIDES CONTAINING URANIUM OR THORIUM
AXO2·xH2O
Uraninite ?5.1.1.1UO2
Group 6 - HYDROXIDES AND OXIDES CONTAINING HYDROXYL
XO(OH)
Goethite6.1.1.2α-Fe3+O(OH)
Group 7 - MULTIPLE OXIDES
AB2X4
Chrysoberyl ?7.2.9.1BeAl2O4
Magnetite7.2.2.3Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Group 8 - MULTIPLE OXIDES CONTAINING NIOBIUM,TANTALUM OR TITANIUM
A2B2O6(O,OH,F)
'Microlite Group'8.2.2.1A2-mTa2X6-wZ-n
'Pyrochlore Group' ?8.2.1.1A2Nb2(O,OH)6Z
AB2O6
Columbite-(Fe)8.3.2.2Fe2+Nb2O6
Group 9 - NORMAL HALIDES
AX2
Fluorite9.2.1.1CaF2
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
AB(XO3)2
Dolomite14.2.1.1CaMg(CO3)2
Group 29 - HYDRATED ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4·xH2O
Gypsum29.6.3.1CaSO4 · 2H2O
Group 41 - ANHYDROUS PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
A5(XO4)3Zq
Fluorapatite41.8.1.1Ca5(PO4)3F
Group 48 - ANHYDROUS MOLYBDATES AND TUNGSTATES
AXO4
Scheelite48.1.2.1Ca(WO4)
Group 51 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups Only
Insular SiO4 Groups Only with cations in [6] and >[6] coordination
Almandine51.4.3a.2Fe2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Grossular ?51.4.3b.2Ca3Al2(SiO4)3
Spessartine ?51.4.3a.3Mn2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Group 52 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups and O,OH,F,H2O
Insular SiO4 Groups and O, OH, F, and H2O with cations in [4] and >[4] coordination
Kyanite ?52.2.2c.1Al2(SiO4)O
Sillimanite ?52.2.2a.1Al2(SiO4)O
Insular SiO4 Groups and O, OH, F, and H2O with cations in [6] coordination only
Topaz52.3.1.1Al2(SiO4)(F,OH)2
Insular SiO4 Groups and O, OH, F, and H2O with cations in [6] and/or >[6] coordination
Titanite52.4.3.1CaTi(SiO4)O
Group 53 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups and Other Anions or Complex Cations
Insular SiO4 Groups and Other Anions of Complex Cations with (UO2)
Uranophane53.3.1.2Ca(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
Group 58 - SOROSILICATES Insular, Mixed, Single, and Larger Tetrahedral Groups
Insular, Mixed, Single, and Larger Tetrahedral Groups with cations in [6] and higher coordination; single and double groups (n = 1, 2)
Vesuvianite58.2.4.1(Ca,Na,☐)19(Al,Mg,Fe3+)13(☐,B,Al,Fe3+)5(Si2O7)4(SiO4)10(OH,F,O)10
Group 61 - CYCLOSILICATES Six-Membered Rings
Six-Membered Rings with [Si6O18] rings; possible (OH) and Al substitution
Beryl61.1.1.1Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Six-Membered Rings with borate groups
Elbaite61.3.1.8Na(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Schorl61.3.1.10Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Group 65 - INOSILICATES Single-Width,Unbranched Chains,(W=1)
Single-Width Unbranched Chains, W=1 with chains P=2
Diopside65.1.3a.1CaMgSi2O6
Spodumene ?65.1.4.1LiAlSi2O6
Group 71 - PHYLLOSILICATES Sheets of Six-Membered Rings
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 2:1 layers
Annite71.2.2b.3KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Muscovite71.2.2a.1KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Phlogopite ?71.2.2b.1KMg3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 2:1 clays
Montmorillonite ?71.3.1a.2(Na,Ca)0.33(Al,Mg)2(Si4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
Sheets of 6-membered rings interlayered 1:1, 2:1, and octahedra
Cookeite71.4.1.2(Al2Li)Al2(AlSi3O10)(OH)8
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Group 76 - TECTOSILICATES Al-Si Framework
Al-Si Framework with Al-Si frameworks
Albite76.1.3.1Na(AlSi3O8)
Microcline76.1.1.5K(AlSi3O8)
Orthoclase76.1.1.1K(AlSi3O8)
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
Actinolite-☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Albite
var: Cleavelandite
-Na(AlSi3O8)
var: Oligoclase ?-(Na,Ca)[Al(Si,Al)Si2O8]
'Axinite Group' ?-
Beryl
var: Aquamarine
-Be3Al2Si6O18
var: Goshenite-Be3Al2(Si6O18)
var: Morganite-Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Fluorite
var: Chlorophane
-CaF2
'Lepidolite'-
Microcline
var: Amazonite
-K(AlSi3O8)
Muscovite
var: Schernikite (FRL)
-KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Quartz
var: Rose Quartz
-SiO2
var: Smoky Quartz-SiO2
'Tantalite' ?-(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
'Tourmaline'-A(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
'var: Achroite'-A(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
H AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H Cookeite(Al2Li)Al2(AlSi3O10)(OH)8
H ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
H Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
H GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
H Montmorillonite(Na,Ca)0.33(Al,Mg)2(Si4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
H MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H PhlogopiteKMg3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H Pyrochlore GroupA2Nb2(O,OH)6Z
H Muscovite (var: Schernikite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
H TopazAl2(SiO4)(F,OH)2
H UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
H Vesuvianite(Ca,Na,☐)19(Al,Mg,Fe3+)13(☐,B,Al,Fe3+)5(Si2O7)4(SiO4)10(OH,F,O)10
LiLithium
Li Cookeite(Al2Li)Al2(AlSi3O10)(OH)8
Li ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Li SpodumeneLiAlSi2O6
BeBeryllium
Be Beryl (var: Aquamarine)Be3Al2Si6O18
Be BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Be ChrysoberylBeAl2O4
Be Beryl (var: Goshenite)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Be Beryl (var: Morganite)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
BBoron
B Tourmaline (var: Achroite)A(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
B ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
B SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
B TourmalineA(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
B Vesuvianite(Ca,Na,☐)19(Al,Mg,Fe3+)13(☐,B,Al,Fe3+)5(Si2O7)4(SiO4)10(OH,F,O)10
CCarbon
C CalciteCaCO3
C DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
C GraphiteC
OOxygen
O Tourmaline (var: Achroite)A(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
O Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
O AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
O AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
O Microcline (var: Amazonite)K(AlSi3O8)
O AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O Beryl (var: Aquamarine)Be3Al2Si6O18
O BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
O CalciteCaCO3
O CassiteriteSnO2
O ChrysoberylBeAl2O4
O Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
O Columbite-(Fe)Fe2+Nb2O6
O Cookeite(Al2Li)Al2(AlSi3O10)(OH)8
O DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
O DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
O ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
O FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
O Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
O Beryl (var: Goshenite)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
O GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
O GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
O HematiteFe2O3
O KyaniteAl2(SiO4)O
O MagnetiteFe2+Fe23+O4
O MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
O Montmorillonite(Na,Ca)0.33(Al,Mg)2(Si4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
O Beryl (var: Morganite)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
O MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O Albite (var: Oligoclase)(Na,Ca)[Al(Si,Al)Si2O8]
O OrthoclaseK(AlSi3O8)
O PhlogopiteKMg3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O Pyrochlore GroupA2Nb2(O,OH)6Z
O PyrolusiteMn4+O2
O QuartzSiO2
O Quartz (var: Rose Quartz)SiO2
O ScheeliteCa(WO4)
O Muscovite (var: Schernikite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
O SillimaniteAl2(SiO4)O
O Quartz (var: Smoky Quartz)SiO2
O SpessartineMn32+Al2(SiO4)3
O SpodumeneLiAlSi2O6
O Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
O TitaniteCaTi(SiO4)O
O TopazAl2(SiO4)(F,OH)2
O TourmalineA(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
O UraniniteUO2
O UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
O Vesuvianite(Ca,Na,☐)19(Al,Mg,Fe3+)13(☐,B,Al,Fe3+)5(Si2O7)4(SiO4)10(OH,F,O)10
FFluorine
F Fluorite (var: Chlorophane)CaF2
F FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
F FluoriteCaF2
F TopazAl2(SiO4)(F,OH)2
F Vesuvianite(Ca,Na,☐)19(Al,Mg,Fe3+)13(☐,B,Al,Fe3+)5(Si2O7)4(SiO4)10(OH,F,O)10
NaSodium
Na AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Na Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
Na ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Na Montmorillonite(Na,Ca)0.33(Al,Mg)2(Si4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
Na Albite (var: Oligoclase)(Na,Ca)[Al(Si,Al)Si2O8]
Na SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Na Vesuvianite(Ca,Na,☐)19(Al,Mg,Fe3+)13(☐,B,Al,Fe3+)5(Si2O7)4(SiO4)10(OH,F,O)10
MgMagnesium
Mg Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Mg DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Mg DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
Mg Montmorillonite(Na,Ca)0.33(Al,Mg)2(Si4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
Mg PhlogopiteKMg3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Mg Vesuvianite(Ca,Na,☐)19(Al,Mg,Fe3+)13(☐,B,Al,Fe3+)5(Si2O7)4(SiO4)10(OH,F,O)10
AlAluminium
Al AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Al AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
Al Microcline (var: Amazonite)K(AlSi3O8)
Al AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al Beryl (var: Aquamarine)Be3Al2Si6O18
Al BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Al ChrysoberylBeAl2O4
Al Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
Al Cookeite(Al2Li)Al2(AlSi3O10)(OH)8
Al ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Al Beryl (var: Goshenite)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Al GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
Al KyaniteAl2(SiO4)O
Al MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
Al Montmorillonite(Na,Ca)0.33(Al,Mg)2(Si4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
Al Beryl (var: Morganite)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Al MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al Albite (var: Oligoclase)(Na,Ca)[Al(Si,Al)Si2O8]
Al OrthoclaseK(AlSi3O8)
Al PhlogopiteKMg3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al Muscovite (var: Schernikite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Al SillimaniteAl2(SiO4)O
Al SpessartineMn32+Al2(SiO4)3
Al SpodumeneLiAlSi2O6
Al TopazAl2(SiO4)(F,OH)2
Al Vesuvianite(Ca,Na,☐)19(Al,Mg,Fe3+)13(☐,B,Al,Fe3+)5(Si2O7)4(SiO4)10(OH,F,O)10
SiSilicon
Si Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Si AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Si AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
Si Microcline (var: Amazonite)K(AlSi3O8)
Si AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si Beryl (var: Aquamarine)Be3Al2Si6O18
Si BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Si Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
Si Cookeite(Al2Li)Al2(AlSi3O10)(OH)8
Si DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Si ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Si Beryl (var: Goshenite)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Si GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
Si KyaniteAl2(SiO4)O
Si MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
Si Montmorillonite(Na,Ca)0.33(Al,Mg)2(Si4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
Si Beryl (var: Morganite)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Si MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si Albite (var: Oligoclase)(Na,Ca)[Al(Si,Al)Si2O8]
Si OrthoclaseK(AlSi3O8)
Si PhlogopiteKMg3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si QuartzSiO2
Si Quartz (var: Rose Quartz)SiO2
Si Muscovite (var: Schernikite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Si SillimaniteAl2(SiO4)O
Si Quartz (var: Smoky Quartz)SiO2
Si SpessartineMn32+Al2(SiO4)3
Si SpodumeneLiAlSi2O6
Si TitaniteCaTi(SiO4)O
Si TopazAl2(SiO4)(F,OH)2
Si UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
Si Vesuvianite(Ca,Na,☐)19(Al,Mg,Fe3+)13(☐,B,Al,Fe3+)5(Si2O7)4(SiO4)10(OH,F,O)10
PPhosphorus
P FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
SSulfur
S ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
S GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
S MolybdeniteMoS2
S PyriteFeS2
S PyrrhotiteFe7S8
S SphaleriteZnS
KPotassium
K Microcline (var: Amazonite)K(AlSi3O8)
K AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
K MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K OrthoclaseK(AlSi3O8)
K PhlogopiteKMg3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K Muscovite (var: Schernikite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
CaCalcium
Ca Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Ca CalciteCaCO3
Ca Fluorite (var: Chlorophane)CaF2
Ca DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Ca DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
Ca FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
Ca FluoriteCaF2
Ca GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
Ca GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
Ca Montmorillonite(Na,Ca)0.33(Al,Mg)2(Si4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
Ca Albite (var: Oligoclase)(Na,Ca)[Al(Si,Al)Si2O8]
Ca ScheeliteCa(WO4)
Ca TitaniteCaTi(SiO4)O
Ca UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
Ca Vesuvianite(Ca,Na,☐)19(Al,Mg,Fe3+)13(☐,B,Al,Fe3+)5(Si2O7)4(SiO4)10(OH,F,O)10
TiTitanium
Ti TitaniteCaTi(SiO4)O
MnManganese
Mn PyrolusiteMn4+O2
Mn SpessartineMn32+Al2(SiO4)3
Mn Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
FeIron
Fe Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Fe AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
Fe AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Fe ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Fe Columbite-(Fe)Fe2+Nb2O6
Fe Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
Fe HematiteFe2O3
Fe MagnetiteFe2+Fe23+O4
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe PyrrhotiteFe7S8
Fe SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Fe Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
Fe Vesuvianite(Ca,Na,☐)19(Al,Mg,Fe3+)13(☐,B,Al,Fe3+)5(Si2O7)4(SiO4)10(OH,F,O)10
CuCopper
Cu ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
ZnZinc
Zn SphaleriteZnS
NbNiobium
Nb Columbite-(Fe)Fe2+Nb2O6
Nb Pyrochlore GroupA2Nb2(O,OH)6Z
Nb Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
MoMolybdenum
Mo MolybdeniteMoS2
SnTin
Sn CassiteriteSnO2
TaTantalum
Ta Microlite GroupA2-mTa2X6-wZ-n
Ta Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
WTungsten
W ScheeliteCa(WO4)
UUranium
U UraniniteUO2
U UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Devonian - Silurian
358.9 - 443.8 Ma



ID: 3186140
Paleozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks

Age: Paleozoic (358.9 - 443.8 Ma)

Lithology: Mudstone-carbonate-sandstone-conglomerate

Reference: Chorlton, L.B. Generalized geology of the world: bedrock domains and major faults in GIS format: a small-scale world geology map with an extended geological attribute database. doi: 10.4095/223767. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 5529. [154]

Late Ordovician - Middle Ordovician
443.8 - 470 Ma



ID: 2978277
Collins Hill Formation

Age: Ordovician (443.8 - 470 Ma)

Stratigraphic Name: Collins Hill Formation

Description: ( = Partridge Formation of New Hampshire) - Gray, rusty-weathering, medium- to coarse-grained, poorly layered schist, composed of quartz, oligoclase, muscovite, biotite, and garnet, and commonly staurolite, kyanite, or sillimanite, generally graphitic, interlayered with fine-grained two-mica gneiss, especially to the west, and with calc-silicate and amphibolite layers, also rare quartz-spessartine (coticule) layers.

Comments: Part of Eastern Uplands; Iapetus (Oceanic) Terrane - Bronson Hill Anticlinorium; Brimfield Schist and equivalent formations (includes Collins Hill Formation) (Upper? and Middle Ordovician). Original map source: Connecticut Geological and Natural History Survey, DEP, in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey, 2000, Bedrock Geology of Connecticut, shapefile, scale 1:50,000

Lithology: Major:{schist}, Minor:{gneiss}, Incidental:{amphibolite, calc silicate rock}

Reference: Horton, J.D., C.A. San Juan, and D.B. Stoeser. The State Geologic Map Compilation (SGMC) geodatabase of the conterminous United States. doi: 10.3133/ds1052. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1052. [133]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Davis, James W. (1901), The Minerals of Haddam, Conn. Mineral Collector: 8(4): 50-54, and (5): 65-70.
Bowman, H. L. (1902), On an Occurrence of Minerals at Haddam Neck, Connecticut, USA. Mineralogical Magazine: 13(60): 97-122.
Baston, Edson S. (1910), Economic Geology of the Feldspar Deposits of the United States. United States Geological Survey Bulletin 420.
Watts, A. S. (1916), Feldspars of New England and North Appalachian States. United States Bureau of Mines Bulletin 92.
Foye, W. G. (1922), Mineral Localities in the Vicinity of Middletown, Connecticut. American Mineralogist: 7: 4-12.
Sterrett, Douglas B. (1923), Mica Deposits of the United States. United States Geological Survey Bulletin 740.
Anonymous. (1932), Old Feldspar Mine Reopened in Haddam Neck. The East Hampton News December 23, 1932: 1(26): 1
Elwell, Wilbur J. (1936), Mineral Collecting by Hydroplane. Rocks & Minerals: 11(6): 92-93.
Gillette, Sterling G. (1937), Some Minerals of the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Conn. Rocks & Minerals: 12: 333.
Stobbe, Helen (1949), The Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Conn. Rocks & Minerals: 24: 496.
Cameron, Eugene N.; Larrabee, David M.; McNair, Andrew H.; Page, James T.; Stewart, Glenn W.; and Shainin, Vincent E. (1954), Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England. US Geological Survey Professional Paper 255.
Schooner, Richard. (1958), The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Stugard, Frederick, Jr. (1958), Pegmatites of the Middletown Area, Connecticut. US Geological Survey Bulletin 1042-Q.
Sinkankas, J. (1959), Gemstones of North America. Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., Inc., Princeton, 675 p.
Ryerson, Kathleen. (1972), Rock Hound’s Guide to Connecticut. Pequot Press.
Vitali, G. (1979), Nostalgia, Twenty Years Of Collecting in the Connecticut Pegmatites. Lapidary Journal: 33: 1598-1610.
Schooner, Richard. (circa 1985), Untitled manuscript on central Connecticut mineralogy.
Scovil, Jeffrey A. (1992), Famous Mineral Localities: the Gillette Quarry, Haddam Neck, Connecticut. Mineralogical Record: 23(1): 19-28.
Weber, Marcelle H. and Earle C. Sullivan. (1995), Connecticut Mineral Locality Index. Rocks & Minerals (Connecticut Issue): 70(6): 403.
Pawloski, John A. (2006), Connecticut Mining. Mt. Pleasant, SC: Arcadia Publishing: 51-54.

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