Help mindat.org|Log In|Register|
Home PageMindat NewsThe Mindat ManualHistory of MindatCopyright StatusManagement TeamContact UsAdvertise on Mindat
Donate to MindatSponsor a PageSponsored PagesTop Available PagesMindat AdvertisersAdvertise on Mindat
Minerals by PropertiesMinerals by ChemistryAdvanced Locality SearchRandom MineralSearch by minIDLocalities Near MeSearch ArticlesSearch GlossaryMore Search Options
Search For:
Mineral Name:
Locality Name:
Keyword(s):
 
The Mindat ManualAdd a New PhotoRate PhotosLocality Edit ReportCoordinate Completion ReportAdd Glossary Item
StatisticsThe ElementsMember ListBooks & MagazinesMineral Shows & EventsThe Mindat DirectoryHow to Link to MindatDevice Settings
Photo SearchPhoto GalleriesNew Photos TodayNew Photos YesterdayMembers' Photo GalleriesPast Photo of the Day Gallery

Farmington, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USA

This page is currently not sponsored. Click here to sponsor this page.
 
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 41° 43' 35'' North , 72° 49' 29'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 41.7263888889, -72.8247222222


A town settled by Europeans in 1645. It originally included Avon (until 1830) and Plainville (until 1869), so using Robinson (1825) as a reference is ambiguous. Descriptions in it of prehnite and calcite, for example, clearly refer to the well-known Talcott Mountain locality now in Avon. Coordinates are for the intersection of state Routes 4 and 10.

Most references to trap rock minerals that are not locality specific (such as Schairer (1931), Januzzi (1976), Tschernich (1992)) are typically referring to the old and largely forgotten Farmington Trap Rock Quarry on state Route 4, which became the town dump and has long been covered.

Geologically, Farmington lies in the Early Mesozoic Hartford Mesozoic Basin, part of the Newark Supergroup of rift basins. The western, lowland part of town is underlain by the Triassic New Haven Arkose, while the eastern, upland portion of town is underlain by the ridge forming Jurassic Talcott and Holyoke Basalts (trap rock), with the intervening sediments of the Shuttle Meadow and East Berlin Formations. The very northwest corner of town, between the Farmington River and state Route 177, is underlain by metamorphic bedrock of the Collinsville dome - mostly Ordovician Collinsville Formation hornblende gneiss and amphibolite with a core of light gray Ordovician Bristol Gneiss.

Mineral List

Mineral list contains entries from the region specified including sub-localities

16 valid minerals.

Rock Types Recorded

Entries shown in red are rocks recorded for this region.

Note: this is a very new system on mindat.org and data is currently VERY limited. Please bear with us while we work towards adding this information!

Rock list contains entries from the region specified including sub-localities


Localities in this Region


The above list contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.

References

Robinson, Samuel. (1825), A Catalogue of American Minerals, with their localities. Boston.

Longwell & Dana (1932), Walks & Rides in Central Connecticut & Massachusetts: 229.

White, John, and Cook, Robert. (1990), Amethyst Occurrences of the Eastern United States. Mineralogical Record: 21(3): 203-213.

Lunar and Planetary Science XXXIV (2003).

Mineral and/or Locality  
Mindat.org is an outreach project of the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization.
Copyright © mindat.org and the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy 1993-2017, except where stated. Mindat.org relies on the contributions of thousands of members and supporters.
Privacy Policy - Terms & Conditions - Contact Us Current server date and time: September 22, 2017 16:17:48 Page generated: February 28, 2017 23:19:36
Go to top of page