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Quincy Mine, Hancock, Houghton Co., Michigan, USA

This page kindly sponsored by Paul Brandes
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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 47° 8' 12'' North , 88° 34' 29'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 47.13667,-88.57500
GeoHash:G#: f03h0kvwu
Locality type:Mine
Köppen climate type:Dfb : Warm-summer humid continental climate


An underground copper mine that began exploration in 1846 and organized in 1848. Began operations working a fissure vein of native copper until 1856 when the Pewabic amygdaloid lode was discovered crossing the property. Operated continuosly from 1848 to 1931. Closed from 1931 to 1937, then re-opened from 1937 to 1945. 9 shafts were driven; 2 of these shafts, #2 and #6, reached 9,280 ft. deep on the incline (approx. 6,800 ft vertical). No. 7 shaft is unique in that is was driven on a catenary curve. In 99 years of operation, Quincy produced 424,000 tons of native copper from the underground workings. A large amount of native silver was also recovered from the mine. Starting in 1947 and continuing through 1968, another 50,000 tons of copper was recovered from reclamation activities in Torch Lake. Small pieces of copper, silver, and datolite can be found in the parking lots around the #2 shafthouse and the hoist building. Today the mine is owned by the Quincy Mine Hoist Association, which gives surface and underground tours of the mine during the summer months.


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20 valid minerals.

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This page contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.

References

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Henwood, W.J. (1871): Observations on Metalliferous Deposits: On the Native Copper of Lake Superior. Transactions of the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall 8(1), 385-489.
Butler, B.S., and Burbank, W.S., 1929, The Copper Deposits of Michigan. U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 144. 238 pp.
Kilpela, T, 1995, The Hard Rock Mining Era in the Copper Country. 89 pp.
Lankton, L.D., and Hyde, C.K., 1982, Old Reliable, The Quincy Mine Hoist Association, Hancock, MI, 159 pp.
Tschernich, R. (1992): Zeolites of the World, 115
The Mineralogical Record: 23: 42-50.

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