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Getchell Mine (North Pit; Center pit; South pit), Adam Peak, Potosi District, Osgood Mts, Humboldt Co., Nevada, USA

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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 41° 12' 57'' North , 117° 15' 24'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 41.21611,-117.25667
GeoHash:G#: 9rkd7z0m1
Locality type:Mine
Köppen climate type:BSk : Cold semi-arid (steppe) climate


A former Au-Ag-As-W-Sb-Hg-Ba(baryte)-Mo-F-Tl-Te-Bi-Sn-Pb-Zn-Cu mine located in secs. 4 & 9, T38N, R42E, and in secs. 28, 29, 32 & 33, T39N, R42E, MDM, 7.4 km (4.6 miles) NNE of Adam Peak (coordinates of record), on private land within a Bureau of Land Management administered area. Discovered by Edward Knight and Emmet Chase in 1933. Overall life of the mine is 1938-present. Owned & operated by the First Miss Gold Corp. Owned & operated by Newmont Gold Mining Company (2003) & Placer Dome Gold (2003). Operated during the periods 1938-1945, 1948-1950, 1962-1967, 1985-1999. MRDS database stated accuracy for this location is 10 meters.

The Getchell property consists of the Getchell, Turquoise Ridge and N Zone deposits. The Main pit has now encompassed the earlier Central and South pits. This is the same location as the old MRDS record M055410.

Prospectors Edward Knight and Emmet Chase discovered gold in 1933 and located the first claims in 1934. With the financial backing of Noble Getchell and George Wingfield, the Getchell Mine, Inc. was organized in 1936 and was brought into production in 1938. In 1938, the mining rate was about 500 tons per day of oxide ore and 150 tons per day of sulfide ore. Sulfide ore was roasted at 1500 degrees Fahrenheit for one hour and fifteen minutes preparatory to cyanidization. In 1941, a Cottrell electric precipitating unit was installed to save the arsenic that was liberated by roasting the sulfide ore, and in 1943-1945, when government wartime restrictions forced the shutdown of many gold producers, Getchell mine was permitted to continue operations as a producer of "strategic" arsenic. In 1943, arsenious oxide was being produced at the rate of 10-25 tons per day from furnace fume. Also in 1942, a 227-tonne scheelite flotation plant was built to recover tungsten from Getchell ore. A slack labor supply and high supply costs forced the gold operations to cease at the end of World War II. The US Bureau of Mines developed a carbon recovery process on site and the mine reopened in 1948 with expanded mill capacity and more underground development but closed again in mid-1950 when known oxide reserves were exhausted. Gold production was suspended in 1951. From 1951-56, the mill processed tungsten ores mined from throughout the district. Tungsten production ceased in 1957. in 1960, Goldfield Consolidated Mines Co. purchased the interests in Getchell Mine, Inc. from the estates of Wingfield and Getchell. Gold production resumed in June 1962 and continued to December 1967, when the mine was closed and the mill dismantled. Cyprus Mines formed a joint venture with Goldfield in 1970, with Cyprus as the operator. Cyprus dropped the property at the end of 1971. Conoco leased the property from Goldfield in 1972 and completed exploration including over 300 drill holes. Metallurgically difficult sulfide reserves were identified during this program. Conoco subleased the property from 1975 to 1978 to General Electric Co. who conducted tungsten exploration along the margins of the Osgood Stock. In 1981, Conoco purchased the property from Goldfield Corp., but by 1983 had sold the property to First Mississippi for $5 million. At that time the property consisted of 14,100 acres of fee land and almost 5000 acres of unpatented claims, and reserves at the time of purchase were in excess of 750,000 ounces of gold. Mining feasibility and metallurgical studies were initiated in 1984. Heap leaching of waste rock dumps from previous mining operations commenced at the end of fiscal 1985, producing 91 ounces of gold in that fiscal year. By mid-1985, the Getchell property had increased the area of unpatented claims to 13,900 acres. In May 1987, the board of First Mississippi Corp. authorized open pit mine development and construction of a new mill utilizing autoclave technology to process 3000 tons of ore per day. The mill was completed and production resumed in 1989 combining a traditional cyanide leach circuit with pressure oxidation. The mill started up on oxide ore in February 1989. Sulfide ore was run through the first pressure oxidation autoclave in April 1989 followed by the startup of the other two autoclaves in May and June 1989. By the end of the fiscal year 1989, project capital costs stood at $90.3 million, 14% over the June 1987 feasibility study estimate. In the fiscal year 1989, overall gold recovery for combined oxide and sulfide mill ores was 89.8%. Heap leaching of waste rock from previous mining operations was completed in the fiscal year 1989. Heap leaching continued beyond this date using oxide reserves from the Summer Camp orebody discovered in 1985.

Production of oxide open pit ore commenced at the nearby Turquoise Ridge mine in 1991 and in the same year, an underground orebody adjacent to the pit area. This ore was to be mined when the pit level was deep enough to provide lateral access. In 1995, First Miss Gold changed its name to Getchell Gold. Underground production commenced at Turquoise Ridge Mine in May 1998. On May 27, 1999, Placer Dome completed a merger with Getchell Gold Corporation, resulting in Placer Dome owning 100% of the Getchell gold property. Gold production has been suspended since July 1999 and the property is on care and maintenance. Production from approximately 58% of the property is subject to a 2% net smelter return royalty payable to Franco Nevada Mining Corporation Ltd. Placer Dome wrote off the carrying value of the property in 2001. On October 25, 2001, Newmont Mining Corporation and Getchell Gold Corporation signed a letter of intent under which Newmont would buy ore from the Getchell mine for processing at Newmont's adjacent Twin Creeks mine.Production of oxide open pit ore commenced at the nearby Turquoise Ridge mine in 1991 and in the same year, an underground orebody adjacent to the pit area. This ore was to be mined when the pit level was deep enough to provide lateral access. In 1995, FirstMiss Gold changed its name to Getchell Gold. Underground production commenced at Turquoise Ridge Mine in May 1998. On May 27, 1999, Placer Dome completed a merger with Getchell Gold Corporation, resulting in Placer Dome owning 100% of the Getchell gold property. Gold production has been suspended since July 1999 and the property is on care and maintenance. Production from approximately 58% of the property is subject to a 2% net smelter return royalty payable to Franco Nevada Mining Corporation Ltd. Placer Dome wrote off the carrying value of the property in 2001. On October 25, 2001, Newmont Mining Corporation and Getchell Gold Corporation signed a letter of intent under which Newmont would buy ore from the Getchell mine for processing at Newmont's adjacent Twin Creeks mine.

Mineralization is a polymetallic deposit (Mineral occurrence model information: Model code 173; USGS model code 26a.1; Deposit model name: Sediment-hosted Au; Mark3 model number 17), hosted in shale & limestone of the Preble Formation (Middle to Late Cambrian). The individual ore bodies are roughly tabular, strike NNW and dip 40-60E at a thickness of 1,000 meters, a width of 60.96 meters and a length of 2,133.6 meters. Controls for ore emplacement involved economic amounts of Au restricted to tabular, sheet-like zones (termed "veins" by Joralemon) within the Getchell fault zone and within favorable calcareous lithologies.

The known gold deposits within the Getchell Trend are Carlin-type, sediment-hosted, replacement deposits containing micron gold. Gold mineralization at Getchell is associated with a curvilinear fault system that strikes NNW and dips 40? to 75? east, on the eastern flank of the Cretaceous Osgood granodiorite stock. The mineralized fault zone and the Cretaceous granodiorite both cut Palaeozoic sediments of the Cambrian Preble and upper Cambrian to lower Ordovician Comus Formations which both belong to the Transition Assemblage and the Ordovician Valmy Formation of the Western Assemblage. Thermal metamorphism along the intrusive contact formed tungsten bearing garnet-diopside skarns, passing outwards into wollastonite calc-silicates and marble. In the southern parts of the Getchell Mine area the skarn is about 30 m wide adjacent to the granodiorite contact, passing out into marble. Pelitic shales of the Preble and Comus Formations are thermally metamorphosed to cordierite-andalusite bearing hornfels nearest the contact, grading outwards into a biotite-cordierite-andalusite interval, to an outer biotite zone. The Osgood Stock and associated hornfels and skarns are found in both the footwall and hangingwall of the mineralized fault zones. Gold mineralization is found in a number of different rock types generally at the intersection of a number of high-angle and low-angle fault sets. The low-angle faults and associated folds are the results of Devonian and Permian-age compressional events and the higher angle faults and fracture sets formed during Tertiary extension. Mineralization is both structurally and stratigraphically controlled. Gold is associated with arsenic, mercury, and to a lesser extent antimony, and commonly with pervasive decalcification, silicification, and carbonaceous alteration. Gold is micron-scale generally intergrown with arsenical pyrite, which in turn, is encrusted in barren, diagenetic pyrite. Late stage realgar and orpiment are commonly associated with high-grade ores. The main deposit is confined to a zone nearly 7000 ft. long at the northern end of the Getchell fault zone. Deep exploration shows that the mineralization persists at least 1 km down-dip on the Getchell fault system and also occurs along the parallel Village fault. Maximum width of ore is 200 ft., with an average width of 40 ft. Within ore zones, gold occurs as native grains that range in size from <1 micron to nearly 1 mm, with smaller grains more abundant than larger grains. Most of the gold is intimately associated with the fine-grained quartz-carbon matrix of the altered rock termed "gumbo" by Joralemon (1951). Of the sulfides, pyrite and marcasite are principal hosts to gold. As of 1951, the gold:silver ratio in bullion ranged from 2:1 to 134:1 and averaged 10:1 for the entire bullion production to that date. Joralemon (1951) observed microscopic metallic grains in the Getchell ore that he concluded were native silver, although the particles were so small that conclusive chemical tests were not possible. No other silver minerals have been recognized except for very rare grains of electrum. Geochemical work at the Getchell mine and vicinity has demonstrated that As-W-Hg anomalies occur in rocks and soils over the arsenic-gold deposits and that these anomalies are not broad haloes but are restricted to the mineralized area. The highest metal contents are found in oxidized iron-rich material along fractures and bedding planes in barren bedrock, lesser values in caliche coatings on exposed bedrock, and lowest but still anomalous values in the soil.The known gold deposits within the Getchell Trend are Carlin-type, sediment-hosted, replacement deposits containing micron gold. Gold mineralization at Getchell is associated with a curvilinear fault system that strikes NNW and dips 40? to 75? east, on the eastern flank of the Cretaceous Osgood granodiorite stock. The mineralized fault zone and the Cretaceous granodiorite both cut Palaeozoic sediments of the Cambrian Preble and upper Cambrian to lower Ordovician Comus Formations which both belong to the Transition Assemblage, and the Ordovician Valmy Formation of the Western Assemblage. Thermal metamorphism along the intrusive contact formed tungsten bearing garnet-diopside skarns, passing outwards into wollastonite calc-silicates and marble. In the southern parts of the Getchell Mine area the skarn is about 30 m wide adjacent to the granodiorite contact, passing out into marble. Pelitic shales of the Preble and Comus Formations are thermally metamorphosed to cordierite-andalusite bearing hornfels nearest the contact, grading outwards into a biotite-cordierite-andalusite interval, to an outer biotite zone. The Osgood Stock and associated hornfels and skarns are found in both the footwall and hangingwall of the mineralized fault zones. Gold mineralization is found in a number of different rock types generally at the intersection of a number of high-angle and low-angle fault sets. The low-angle faults and associated folds are the results of Devonian and Permian-age compressional events and the higher angle faults and fracture sets formed during Tertiary extension. Mineralization is both structurally and stratigraphically controlled. Gold is associated with arsenic, mercury, and to a lesser extent antimony, and commonly with pervasive decalcification, silicification and carbonaceous alteration. Gold is micron-scale generally intergrown with arsenical pyrite, which in turn, is encrusted in barren, diagenetic pyrite. Late stage realgar and orpiment are commonly associated with high-grade ores. The main deposit is confined to a zone nearly 7000 ft. long at the northern end of the Getchell fault zone. Deep exploration shows that the mineralization persists at least 1 km down-dip on the Getchell fault system and also occurs along the parallel Village fault. Maximum width of ore is 200 ft., with an average width of 40 ft. Within ore zones, gold occurs as native grains that range in size from <1 micron to nearly 1 mm, with smaller grains more abundant than larger grains. Most of the gold is intimately associated with the fine-grained quartz-carbon matrix of the altered rock termed "gumbo" by Joralemon (1951). Of the sulfides, pyrite and marcasite are principal hosts to gold. As of 1951, the gold:silver ratio in bullion ranged from 2:1 to 134:1 and averaged 10:1 for the entire bullion production to that date. Joralemon (1951) observed microscopic metallic grains in the Getchell ore that he concluded were native silver, although the particles were so small that conclusive chemical tests were not possible. No other silver minerals have been recognized except for very rare grains of electrum. Geochemical work at the Getchell mine and vicinity has demonstrated that As-W-Hg anomalies occur in rocks and soils over the arsenic-gold deposits and that these anomalies are not broad haloes but are restricted to the mineralized area. The highest metal contents are found in oxidized iron-rich material along fractures and bedding planes in barren bedrock, lesser values in caliche coatings on exposed bedrock, and lowest but still anomalous values in soil.

Regional alteration: There is a metamorphic aureole around the Osgood Mountains granodiorite which has produced in the surrounding shaly rocks a mineral assemblage consisting of cordierite-, biotite-, and andalusite-hornfels. Locally limy beds are recrystallized and calc-silicate minerals are developed. Hydrothermal alteration consists chiefly of decarbonatization accompanied by silicification in the limestone beds. Cordierite, andalusite, and biotite of the metamorphic aureole are altered to sericite and/or chlorite. Igneous dikes and portions of the main stock are altered such that plagioclase is altered to sericite and kaolinite and biotite is altered to sericite, chlorite, and pyrite.

Associated rocks include Late Cretaceous granodiorite and porphyry of the Osgood Mountains pluton. Local rocks/geologic units include alluvial deposits.

Geology: Bagby and Cline (1991) offer preliminary results from research which indicate that confining pressures on the Getchell ore system varied from approximately 370-430 bars either during, or at some time subsequent to mineralization. These fluid pressures are greater than those which are normally accepted as epithermal.Geology comments: Bagby and Cline (1991) offer preliminary results from research which indicate that confining pressures on the Getchell ore system varied from approximately 370-430 bars either during, or at some time subsequent to mineralization. These fluid pressures are greater than those which are normally accepted as epithermal.

Regional geologic structures: Regional thrust faults to the north and NNW-trending faults.

Local geologic structures: Gold mineralization is generally found at the intersection of a number of high-angle and low-angle fault sets. The low-angle faults and associated folds are the results of Devonian and Permian-age compressional events and the higher angle faults and fracture sets formed during Tertiary extension. Mineralization is both structurally and stratigraphically controlled. The Getchell fault is a zone of overlapping fractures which have an overall strike of N10W. Hotz and Willden (1964) offer evidence for up to 3500 feet of left lateral strike-slip displacement and only a relatively small amount of dip-slip movement along the Getchell fault. McCollum and McCollum (1991) indicate that the sense of movement on the Getchell fault is right lateral. The Getchell Fault Zone is a complex system of sub-parallel, high angle faults which is at least 500 m wide. The zone is made up of a number of fault planes, separated by brecciated gouge and characterised by intense clay alteration, and by brecciation in the hanging wall.

The main Getchell deposit within the fault has been drilled to a depth of 600 meters down dip from the original surface and remains open down dip. There is a 'Main Vein' which is a dominant structure with a distinct footwall, complexed by several conjugate veins to the west. Sub-parallel, mineralised structures have also been found up to 200 m into the footwall of this main structure, while alteration, fault gouge and mineralisation occur up to 500 meters to the east into its hanging wall (First Miss Gold Inc., 1993). Movement on the Getchell Fault has been both normal and dextral strike-slip (McCollum & McCollum 1990). On the basis of the relative displacement of the Palaeozoic sediments and the Cretaceous granodiorite of the Osgood Mountain Stock it is believed that the Getchell Fault is a reactivated older structure (D. Bond, Personal communication, 1993). The most recent displacement has taken place during the Miocene to present Basin and Range movement, representing further reactivation of an older structure. The fault cuts all three main stratigraphic units found within the pit, as well as the Osgood Mountain Stock. Altered blocks of granodiorite, rimmed by the skarn assemblage, are faulted downwards along the footwall structure into the Getchell Fault Zone and subsequently mineralised with gold (FirstMiss Gold Inc., 1993).

Workings included surface and underground openings. The mine has been developed by both underground and surface workings at various times during its production history. The Getchell deposit was developed by the North, Center, South, and Hansen Creek Pits. The Getchell underground is fully developed and is accessed from the Getchell open pit via two portals. The Getchell underground has a relatively short remaining mine life based on current proven reserves, although its life may be extended with the lower processing costs, additional exploration drilling, and engineering analysis. Mining methods for the Getchell underground are currently 100% drift-and-fill, as the last of the longhole ore was produced in 2005.

Production information: From 1938 to 1996 the Getchell property produced 66.8 kilotonnes of gold and more than 1.2 kilotonnes of silver from 18,361 kilotonnes of ore. In 1997, the remaining Getchell resource was estimated at 14,400 kilotonnes of ore containing 153 kilotonnes of gold and an unknown amount of Ag and As. This resource includes Getchell underground, stockpiles, unmineable resource in the Main pit, and North Getchell underground resource.

Analytical data results: Average ore grade 0.18-0.23 ounces per ton Au.

Reserve/resource data: August 1997 - proven and probable reserves at the Getchell property, not including Turquoise Ridge, are 14.9 million tons grading 0.3 ounces Au/ton. Including Turquoise Ridge, the total mineral inventory is 10.9 million ounces Au.

Alternative Label Names

This is a list of additional names that have been recorded for mineral labels associated with this locality in the minID database. This may include previous versions of the locality name hierarchy from mindat.org, data entry errors, and it may also include unconfirmed sublocality names or other names that can only be matched to this level.

Getchell Mine, Humboldt Co., Nevada, USA
Getchell Mine, Adam Peak, Potosi District, Humboldt Co., Nevada, USA
Getchell Mine

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List

Mineral list contains entries from the region specified including sub-localities

76 valid minerals. 1 (TL) - type locality of valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Acanthite
Formula: Ag2S
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Aktashite
Formula: Cu6Hg3As4S12
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
'Apophyllite'
Reference: Keith Wood (visual ID)
Arsenic
Formula: As
Reference: Econ Geology (1993)88:171-185
Arsenolite
Formula: As2O3
Reference: MinRec 19:253-257
Arsenopyrite
Formula: FeAsS
Reference: Econ Geology (1993)88:171-185; Econ Geol (1997) 92:601-622
Baryte
Formula: BaSO4
Reference: MinRec 19:253-257
'Biotite'
Reference: Econ Geol (1997) 92:601-622; Econ Geol (1997) 92:601-622
Bismuthinite
Formula: Bi2S3
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310488.
Bornite
Formula: Cu5FeS4
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada; Econ Geol (1997) 92:601-622; USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310488.
Cassiterite
Formula: SnO2
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
'Chabazite'
Reference: MinRec 19:253-257
Chaidamuite
Formula: ZnFe3+(SO4)2(OH) · 4H2O
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Chalcocite
Formula: Cu2S
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310488.
Chalcopyrite
Formula: CuFeS2
Reference: MinRec 19:253-257; Econ Geol (1997) 92:601-622
'Chlorite Group'
Reference: Econ Geol (1997) 92:601-622
Christite
Formula: TlHgAsS3
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Cinnabar
Formula: HgS
Reference: Mineralogical Record 16:15-23
Coloradoite
Formula: HgTe
Reference: MinRec 19:253-257
Copper
Formula: Cu
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Covellite
Formula: CuS
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310488.
Crandallite
Formula: CaAl3(PO4)(PO3OH)(OH)6
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
'Electrum'
Formula: (Au, Ag)
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310488.
Epidote
Formula: {Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310488.
Epsomite
Formula: MgSO4 · 7H2O
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Ferrimolybdite
Formula: Fe2(MoO4)3 · nH2O
Reference: MinRec 19:253-257
Fluorapatite
Formula: Ca5(PO4)3F
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Fluorapatite var: Carbonate-rich Fluorapatite
Formula: Ca5(PO4,CO3)3(F,O)
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Fluorapophyllite-(K)
Formula: KCa4(Si8O20)(F,OH) · 8H2O
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Fluorapophyllite-(Na)
Formula: NaCa4(Si8O20)F · 8H2O
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Fluorite
Formula: CaF2
Reference: Mineralogical Record 16:15-23
Galena
Formula: PbS
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada; Econ Geol (1997) 92:601-622
Galkhaite
Formula: (Cs,Tl)(Hg,Cu,Zn)6(As,Sb)4S12
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada; Jungles, G. (1974): Galkhaite: A newly described mineral from Siberia found at the Getchell mine, Nevada. Mineralogical Record 5: 290
'Garnet Group'
Formula: X3Z2(SiO4)3
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310488.
Getchellite (TL)
Formula: AsSbS3
Reference: Weissberg, B. G. (1965): Getchellite, AsSbS3, a new mineral from Humboldt County, Nevada, American Mineralogist, 50, 1817-1826 ; American Mineralogist, Volume 68, pages 235-244, 1983
'Gismondine'
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Gold
Formula: Au
Reference: MinRec 19:253-257; Econ Geol (1997) 92:601-622
Graphite
Formula: C
Reference: MinRec 19:253-257
Guérinite
Formula: Ca5(AsO4)2(HAsO4)2 · 9H2O
Reference: MinRec 19:253-257
Gypsum
Formula: CaSO4 · 2H2O
Reference: Mineralogical Record 16:15-23
Haidingerite
Formula: CaHAsO4 · H2O
Reference: MinRec 19:253-257
'Heulandite subgroup'
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Hübnerite
Formula: MnWO4
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Ilsemannite
Formula: Mo3O8 · nH2O
Reference: [MinRec 16:20]; NBMG Open File Report 79-3
Jarosite
Formula: KFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Jordanite
Formula: Pb14(As,Sb)6S23
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Kaolinite
Formula: Al2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Kermesite
Formula: Sb2S2O
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Laffittite
Formula: AgHgAsS3
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada; Nakai,I. & Appleman, D.E. (1983): Laffitite, AgHgAsS3, crystal structure & second occurrence from the Getchell Mine, Nevada, American Mineralogist, 68: 235-244
Lorándite
Formula: TlAsS2
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Magnetite
Formula: Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Reference: MinRec 19:253-257
Malachite
Formula: Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Marcasite
Formula: FeS2
Reference: MinRec 19:253-257; Econ Geol (1997) 92:601-622; NBMG Open File Report 79-3
Massicot
Formula: PbO
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Melanterite
Formula: Fe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Meta-autunite
Formula: Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
Metacinnabar
Formula: HgS
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Metastibnite
Formula: Sb2S3
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Molybdenite
Formula: MoS2
Reference: NBMG Open File Report 79-3
Muscovite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Reference: Econ Geol (1997) 92:601-622
Muscovite var: Sericite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Reference: Econ Geol (1997) 92:601-622
Orpiment
Formula: As2S3
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada; Econ Geol (1997) 92:601-622; American Mineralogist, Volume 68, pages 235-244, 1983; NBMG Open File Report 79-3
Pararealgar
Formula: As4S4
Reference: Handbook of Mineralogy
Pascoite
Formula: Ca3(V10O28) · 17H2O
Pharmacolite
Formula: Ca(HAsO4) · 2H2O
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10310488.
Picropharmacolite
Formula: Ca4Mg(AsO4)2(HAsO4)2 · 11H2O
Reference: Mineralogical Record 16:15-23
Piemontite
Formula: {Ca2}{Al2Mn3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Polhemusite
Formula: (Zn,Hg)S
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Reference: Am Min 50:1817-1826; Econ Geol (1997) 92:601-622
Pyrrhotite
Formula: Fe7S8
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada; Econ Geol (1997) 92:601-622
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Reference: Am Min 50:1817-1826
Quartz var: Amethyst
Formula: SiO2
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Quartz var: Chalcedony
Formula: SiO2
Reference: Econ Geol (1997) 92:601-622
Rauenthalite
Formula: Ca3(AsO4)2 · 10H2O
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Realgar
Formula: As4S4
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada; Econ Geol (1997) 92:601-622; American Mineralogist, Volume 68, pages 235-244, 1983; NBMG Open File Report 79-3
Rozenite
Formula: FeSO4 · 4H2O
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Scheelite
Formula: Ca(WO4)
Reference: MinRec 19:253-257; NBMG Open File Report 79-3
Scorodite
Formula: Fe3+AsO4 · 2H2O
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Silver
Formula: Ag
Reference: NBMG Bull 59 Geology and Mineral Resources of Humboldt County, Nevada
Sphalerite
Formula: ZnS
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada; Econ Geol (1997) 92:601-622
'Stibiconite'
Formula: Sb3+Sb5+2O6(OH)
Reference: Rolf Luetcke
Stibnite
Formula: Sb2S3
Reference: Mineralogical Record 16:15-23; Econ Geol (1997) 92:601-622; American Mineralogist, Volume 68, pages 235-244, 1983; NBMG Open File Report 79-3
'Stilbite subgroup'
Reference: Doug Merson photo & collection
Sulphur
Formula: S8
Reference: Rolf Luetcke
Symplesite
Formula: Fe2+3(AsO4)2 · 8H2O
Reference: NBMG Spec Pub 31 Minerals of Nevada
Tvalchrelidzeite
Formula: Hg3SbAsS3
Reference: Anthony, Bideaux, Bladh, Nichols: "Handbook of Mineralogy", Vol. 1, 1990
Wakabayashilite
Formula: [(As,Sb)6S9][As4S5]
Reference: NBMG Spec. Pub. 31 Minerals of Nevada
Weilite
Formula: Ca(HAsO4)
Reference: Handbook of Mineralogy
Wollastonite
Formula: CaSiO3
Reference: NBMG Spec Pub 31 Minerals of Nevada

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 1 - Elements
Arsenic1.CA.05As
Copper1.AA.05Cu
Electrum1.AA.05(Au, Ag)
Gold1.AA.05Au
Graphite1.CB.05aC
Silver1.AA.05Ag
Sulphur1.CC.05S8
Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
'Acanthite'2.BA.35Ag2S
'Aktashite'2.GA.30Cu6Hg3As4S12
Arsenopyrite2.EB.20FeAsS
Bismuthinite2.DB.05Bi2S3
Bornite2.BA.15Cu5FeS4
Chalcocite2.BA.05Cu2S
Chalcopyrite2.CB.10aCuFeS2
Christite2.HD.15TlHgAsS3
Cinnabar2.CD.15aHgS
Coloradoite2.CB.05aHgTe
Covellite2.CA.05aCuS
Galena2.CD.10PbS
Galkhaite2.GB.20(Cs,Tl)(Hg,Cu,Zn)6(As,Sb)4S12
Getchellite (TL)2.FA.35AsSbS3
Jordanite2.JB.30aPb14(As,Sb)6S23
Kermesite2.FD.05Sb2S2O
Laffittite2.GA.35AgHgAsS3
Lorándite2.HD.05TlAsS2
Marcasite2.EB.10aFeS2
Metacinnabar2.CB.05aHgS
Metastibnite2.DB.05Sb2S3
Molybdenite2.EA.30MoS2
Orpiment2.FA.30As2S3
Pararealgar2.FA.15bAs4S4
Polhemusite2.CB.05c(Zn,Hg)S
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Pyrrhotite2.CC.10Fe7S8
Realgar2.FA.15aAs4S4
Sphalerite2.CB.05aZnS
Stibnite2.DB.05Sb2S3
Tvalchrelidzeite2.GC.45Hg3SbAsS3
Wakabayashilite2.FA.40[(As,Sb)6S9][As4S5]
Group 3 - Halides
Fluorite3.AB.25CaF2
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Arsenolite4.CB.50As2O3
Cassiterite4.DB.05SnO2
Hübnerite4.DB.30MnWO4
Ilsemannite4.FJ.15Mo3O8 · nH2O
Magnetite4.BB.05Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Massicot4.AC.25PbO
Pascoite4.HC.05Ca3(V10O28) · 17H2O
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
var: Amethyst4.DA.05SiO2
var: Chalcedony4.DA.05SiO2
Stibiconite4.DH.20Sb3+Sb5+2O6(OH)
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Calcite5.AB.05CaCO3
Malachite5.BA.10Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
Baryte7.AD.35BaSO4
Chaidamuite7.DC.30ZnFe3+(SO4)2(OH) · 4H2O
Epsomite7.CB.40MgSO4 · 7H2O
Ferrimolybdite7.GB.30Fe2(MoO4)3 · nH2O
Gypsum7.CD.40CaSO4 · 2H2O
Jarosite7.BC.10KFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
Melanterite7.CB.35Fe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
Rozenite7.CB.15FeSO4 · 4H2O
Scheelite7.GA.05Ca(WO4)
Group 8 - Phosphates, Arsenates and Vanadates
Crandallite8.BL.10CaAl3(PO4)(PO3OH)(OH)6
Fluorapatite8.BN.05Ca5(PO4)3F
var: Carbonate-rich Fluorapatite8.BN.05Ca5(PO4,CO3)3(F,O)
Guérinite8.CJ.75Ca5(AsO4)2(HAsO4)2 · 9H2O
Haidingerite8.CJ.20CaHAsO4 · H2O
Meta-autunite8.EB.10Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
Pharmacolite8.CJ.50Ca(HAsO4) · 2H2O
Picropharmacolite8.CH.15Ca4Mg(AsO4)2(HAsO4)2 · 11H2O
Rauenthalite8.CJ.40Ca3(AsO4)2 · 10H2O
Scorodite8.CD.10Fe3+AsO4 · 2H2O
Symplesite8.CE.45Fe2+3(AsO4)2 · 8H2O
Weilite8.AD.10Ca(HAsO4)
Group 9 - Silicates
Epidote9.BG.05a{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Fluorapophyllite-(K)9.EA.15KCa4(Si8O20)(F,OH) · 8H2O
Fluorapophyllite-(Na)9.EA.15NaCa4(Si8O20)F · 8H2O
Gismondine9..
Kaolinite9.ED.05Al2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Muscovite9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
var: Sericite9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Piemontite9.BG.05{Ca2}{Al2Mn3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Wollastonite9.DG.05CaSiO3
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
Apophyllite-
Biotite-
Chabazite-
Chlorite Group-
Garnet Group-X3Z2(SiO4)3
Heulandite subgroup-
Stilbite subgroup-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 1 - NATIVE ELEMENTS AND ALLOYS
Metals, other than the Platinum Group
Copper1.1.1.3Cu
Gold1.1.1.1Au
Silver1.1.1.2Ag
Semi-metals and non-metals
Arsenic1.3.1.1As
Graphite1.3.6.2C
Sulphur1.3.5.1S8
Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 2:1
Acanthite2.4.1.1Ag2S
Chalcocite2.4.7.1Cu2S
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 3:2
Bornite2.5.2.1Cu5FeS4
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Cinnabar2.8.14.1HgS
Coloradoite2.8.2.5HgTe
Covellite2.8.12.1CuS
Galena2.8.1.1PbS
Metacinnabar2.8.2.3HgS
Pararealgar2.8.21.2As4S4
Polhemusite2.8.3.1(Zn,Hg)S
Pyrrhotite2.8.10.1Fe7S8
Realgar2.8.21.1As4S4
Sphalerite2.8.2.1ZnS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:1
Chalcopyrite2.9.1.1CuFeS2
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 2:3
Bismuthinite2.11.2.3Bi2S3
Getchellite (TL)2.11.1.2AsSbS3
Metastibnite2.11.3.1Sb2S3
Orpiment2.11.1.1As2S3
Stibnite2.11.2.1Sb2S3
Wakabayashilite2.11.4.1[(As,Sb)6S9][As4S5]
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Arsenopyrite2.12.4.1FeAsS
Marcasite2.12.2.1FeS2
Molybdenite2.12.10.1MoS2
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Oxysulfides
Kermesite2.13.1.1Sb2S2O
Group 3 - SULFOSALTS
3 <ø < 4
Jordanite3.3.1.1Pb14(As,Sb)6S23
ø = 3
Aktashite3.4.13.2Cu6Hg3As4S12
Christite3.4.10.1TlHgAsS3
Galkhaite3.4.14.1(Cs,Tl)(Hg,Cu,Zn)6(As,Sb)4S12
Laffittite3.4.10.2AgHgAsS3
ø = 2
Lorándite3.7.6.1TlAsS2
1 < ø < 2
Tvalchrelidzeite3.8.3.1Hg3SbAsS3
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
AX
Massicot4.2.7.1PbO
A2X3
Arsenolite4.3.9.1As2O3
AX2
Cassiterite4.4.1.5SnO2
Miscellaneous
Ilsemannite4.6.3.1Mo3O8 · nH2O
Group 7 - MULTIPLE OXIDES
AB2X4
Magnetite7.2.2.3Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Group 9 - NORMAL HALIDES
AX2
Fluorite9.2.1.1CaF2
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
Group 16a - ANHYDROUS CARBONATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
Malachite16a.3.1.1Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Group 28 - ANHYDROUS ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4
Baryte28.3.1.1BaSO4
Group 29 - HYDRATED ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4·xH2O
Epsomite29.6.11.1MgSO4 · 7H2O
Gypsum29.6.3.1CaSO4 · 2H2O
Melanterite29.6.10.1Fe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
Rozenite29.6.6.1FeSO4 · 4H2O
Group 30 - ANHYDROUS SULFATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
(AB)2(XO4)Zq
Jarosite30.2.5.1KFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
Group 31 - HYDRATED SULFATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
(AB)(XO4)Zq·xH2O
Chaidamuite31.9.7.2ZnFe3+(SO4)2(OH) · 4H2O
Group 37 - ANHYDROUS ACID PHOSPHATES, ARSENATES AND VANADATES
Miscellaneous
Weilite37.1.1.2Ca(HAsO4)
Group 39 - HYDRATED ACID PHOSPHATES,ARSENATES AND VANADATES
A[HXO4]·xH2O
Haidingerite39.1.5.1CaHAsO4 · H2O
Pharmacolite39.1.1.2Ca(HAsO4) · 2H2O
(AB)5[HXO4]2[XO4]2.xH2O
Guérinite39.2.2.2Ca5(AsO4)2(HAsO4)2 · 9H2O
Picropharmacolite39.2.4.1Ca4Mg(AsO4)2(HAsO4)2 · 11H2O
Group 40 - HYDRATED NORMAL PHOSPHATES,ARSENATES AND VANADATES
AB2(XO4)2·xH2O, containing (UO2)2+
Meta-autunite40.2a.1.2Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
A3(XO4)2·xH2O
Rauenthalite40.3.11.1Ca3(AsO4)2 · 10H2O
Symplesite40.3.8.1Fe2+3(AsO4)2 · 8H2O
(AB)5(XO4)2·xH2O
Scorodite40.4.1.3Fe3+AsO4 · 2H2O
Group 41 - ANHYDROUS PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
A5(XO4)3Zq
Fluorapatite41.8.1.1Ca5(PO4)3F
var: Carbonate-rich Fluorapatite41.8.1.4Ca5(PO4,CO3)3(F,O)
Group 42 - HYDRATED PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
(AB)2(XO4)Zq·xH2O
Crandallite42.7.3.1CaAl3(PO4)(PO3OH)(OH)6
Group 44 - ANTIMONATES
A2X2O6(O,OH,F)
'Stibiconite'44.1.1.1Sb3+Sb5+2O6(OH)
Group 47 - VANADIUM OXYSALTS
Anhydrous Vanadium Oxysalts Containing Hydroxyl or Halogen
Pascoite47.2.1.1Ca3(V10O28) · 17H2O
Group 48 - ANHYDROUS MOLYBDATES AND TUNGSTATES
AXO4
Hübnerite48.1.1.1MnWO4
Scheelite48.1.2.1Ca(WO4)
Group 49 - HYDRATED MOLYBDATES AND TUNGSTATES
Hydrated Normal Molybdates and Tungstates
Ferrimolybdite49.2.1.1Fe2(MoO4)3 · nH2O
Group 58 - SOROSILICATES Insular, Mixed, Single, and Larger Tetrahedral Groups
Insular, Mixed, Single, and Larger Tetrahedral Groups with cations in [6] and higher coordination; single and double groups (n = 1, 2)
Epidote58.2.1a.7{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Piemontite58.2.1a.11{Ca2}{Al2Mn3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Group 65 - INOSILICATES Single-Width,Unbranched Chains,(W=1)
Single-Width Unbranched Chains, W=1 with chains P=3
Wollastonite65.2.1.1cCaSiO3
Group 71 - PHYLLOSILICATES Sheets of Six-Membered Rings
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 2:1 layers
Muscovite71.2.2a.1KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Group 72 - PHYLLOSILICATES Two-Dimensional Infinite Sheets with Other Than Six-Membered Rings
Two-Dimensional Infinite Sheets with Other Than Six-Membered Rings with 3-, 4-, or 5-membered rings and 8-membered rings
Fluorapophyllite-(K)72.3.1.1KCa4(Si8O20)(F,OH) · 8H2O
Fluorapophyllite-(Na)72.3.1.3NaCa4(Si8O20)F · 8H2O
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Group 77 - TECTOSILICATES Zeolites
Zeolite group - True zeolites
'Gismondine'77.1.3.1
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Apophyllite'-
'Biotite'-
'Chabazite'-
'Chlorite Group'-
'Electrum'-(Au, Ag)
'Garnet Group'-X3Z2(SiO4)3
'Heulandite subgroup'-
Kaolinite-Al2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Muscovite
var: Sericite
-KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Quartz
var: Amethyst
-SiO2
var: Chalcedony-SiO2
'Stilbite subgroup'-

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H ChaidamuiteZnFe3+(SO4)2(OH) · 4H2O
H CrandalliteCaAl3(PO4)(PO3OH)(OH)6
H Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
H EpsomiteMgSO4 · 7H2O
H FerrimolybditeFe2(MoO4)3 · nH2O
H Fluorapophyllite-(K)KCa4(Si8O20)(F,OH) · 8H2O
H Fluorapophyllite-(Na)NaCa4(Si8O20)F · 8H2O
H GuériniteCa5(AsO4)2(HAsO4)2 · 9H2O
H GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
H HaidingeriteCaHAsO4 · H2O
H IlsemanniteMo3O8 · nH2O
H JarositeKFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
H KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
H MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
H MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
H Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
H MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H PascoiteCa3(V10O28) · 17H2O
H PharmacoliteCa(HAsO4) · 2H2O
H PicropharmacoliteCa4Mg(AsO4)2(HAsO4)2 · 11H2O
H Piemontite{Ca2}{Al2Mn3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
H RauenthaliteCa3(AsO4)2 · 10H2O
H RozeniteFeSO4 · 4H2O
H ScoroditeFe3+AsO4 · 2H2O
H Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H StibiconiteSb3+Sb25+O6(OH)
H SymplesiteFe32+(AsO4)2 · 8H2O
H WeiliteCa(HAsO4)
CCarbon
C CalciteCaCO3
C Fluorapatite (var: Carbonate-rich Fluorapatite)Ca5(PO4,CO3)3(F,O)
C GraphiteC
C MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
OOxygen
O Quartz (var: Amethyst)SiO2
O ArsenoliteAs2O3
O BaryteBaSO4
O CalciteCaCO3
O Fluorapatite (var: Carbonate-rich Fluorapatite)Ca5(PO4,CO3)3(F,O)
O CassiteriteSnO2
O ChaidamuiteZnFe3+(SO4)2(OH) · 4H2O
O Quartz (var: Chalcedony)SiO2
O CrandalliteCaAl3(PO4)(PO3OH)(OH)6
O Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
O EpsomiteMgSO4 · 7H2O
O FerrimolybditeFe2(MoO4)3 · nH2O
O FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
O Fluorapophyllite-(K)KCa4(Si8O20)(F,OH) · 8H2O
O Fluorapophyllite-(Na)NaCa4(Si8O20)F · 8H2O
O Garnet GroupX3Z2(SiO4)3
O GuériniteCa5(AsO4)2(HAsO4)2 · 9H2O
O GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
O HaidingeriteCaHAsO4 · H2O
O HübneriteMnWO4
O IlsemanniteMo3O8 · nH2O
O JarositeKFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
O KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
O KermesiteSb2S2O
O MagnetiteFe2+Fe23+O4
O MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
O MassicotPbO
O MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
O Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
O MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O PascoiteCa3(V10O28) · 17H2O
O PharmacoliteCa(HAsO4) · 2H2O
O PicropharmacoliteCa4Mg(AsO4)2(HAsO4)2 · 11H2O
O Piemontite{Ca2}{Al2Mn3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
O QuartzSiO2
O RauenthaliteCa3(AsO4)2 · 10H2O
O RozeniteFeSO4 · 4H2O
O ScheeliteCa(WO4)
O ScoroditeFe3+AsO4 · 2H2O
O Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O StibiconiteSb3+Sb25+O6(OH)
O SymplesiteFe32+(AsO4)2 · 8H2O
O WeiliteCa(HAsO4)
O WollastoniteCaSiO3
FFluorine
F Fluorapatite (var: Carbonate-rich Fluorapatite)Ca5(PO4,CO3)3(F,O)
F FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
F Fluorapophyllite-(K)KCa4(Si8O20)(F,OH) · 8H2O
F Fluorapophyllite-(Na)NaCa4(Si8O20)F · 8H2O
F FluoriteCaF2
NaSodium
Na Fluorapophyllite-(Na)NaCa4(Si8O20)F · 8H2O
MgMagnesium
Mg EpsomiteMgSO4 · 7H2O
Mg PicropharmacoliteCa4Mg(AsO4)2(HAsO4)2 · 11H2O
AlAluminium
Al CrandalliteCaAl3(PO4)(PO3OH)(OH)6
Al Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Al KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Al MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al Piemontite{Ca2}{Al2Mn3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Al Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
SiSilicon
Si Quartz (var: Amethyst)SiO2
Si Quartz (var: Chalcedony)SiO2
Si Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Si Fluorapophyllite-(K)KCa4(Si8O20)(F,OH) · 8H2O
Si Fluorapophyllite-(Na)NaCa4(Si8O20)F · 8H2O
Si Garnet GroupX3Z2(SiO4)3
Si KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Si MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si Piemontite{Ca2}{Al2Mn3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Si QuartzSiO2
Si Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si WollastoniteCaSiO3
PPhosphorus
P Fluorapatite (var: Carbonate-rich Fluorapatite)Ca5(PO4,CO3)3(F,O)
P CrandalliteCaAl3(PO4)(PO3OH)(OH)6
P FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
P Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
SSulfur
S AcanthiteAg2S
S AktashiteCu6Hg3As4S12
S ArsenopyriteFeAsS
S BaryteBaSO4
S BismuthiniteBi2S3
S BorniteCu5FeS4
S ChaidamuiteZnFe3+(SO4)2(OH) · 4H2O
S ChalcociteCu2S
S ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
S ChristiteTlHgAsS3
S CinnabarHgS
S CovelliteCuS
S EpsomiteMgSO4 · 7H2O
S GalenaPbS
S Galkhaite(Cs,Tl)(Hg,Cu,Zn)6(As,Sb)4S12
S GetchelliteAsSbS3
S GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
S JarositeKFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
S JordanitePb14(As,Sb)6S23
S KermesiteSb2S2O
S LaffittiteAgHgAsS3
S LoránditeTlAsS2
S MarcasiteFeS2
S MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
S MetacinnabarHgS
S MetastibniteSb2S3
S MolybdeniteMoS2
S OrpimentAs2S3
S PararealgarAs4S4
S Polhemusite(Zn,Hg)S
S PyriteFeS2
S PyrrhotiteFe7S8
S RealgarAs4S4
S RozeniteFeSO4 · 4H2O
S SphaleriteZnS
S StibniteSb2S3
S SulphurS8
S TvalchrelidzeiteHg3SbAsS3
S Wakabayashilite[(As,Sb)6S9][As4S5]
KPotassium
K Fluorapophyllite-(K)KCa4(Si8O20)(F,OH) · 8H2O
K JarositeKFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
K MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
CaCalcium
Ca CalciteCaCO3
Ca Fluorapatite (var: Carbonate-rich Fluorapatite)Ca5(PO4,CO3)3(F,O)
Ca CrandalliteCaAl3(PO4)(PO3OH)(OH)6
Ca Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Ca FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
Ca Fluorapophyllite-(K)KCa4(Si8O20)(F,OH) · 8H2O
Ca Fluorapophyllite-(Na)NaCa4(Si8O20)F · 8H2O
Ca FluoriteCaF2
Ca GuériniteCa5(AsO4)2(HAsO4)2 · 9H2O
Ca GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
Ca HaidingeriteCaHAsO4 · H2O
Ca Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
Ca PascoiteCa3(V10O28) · 17H2O
Ca PharmacoliteCa(HAsO4) · 2H2O
Ca PicropharmacoliteCa4Mg(AsO4)2(HAsO4)2 · 11H2O
Ca Piemontite{Ca2}{Al2Mn3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Ca RauenthaliteCa3(AsO4)2 · 10H2O
Ca ScheeliteCa(WO4)
Ca WeiliteCa(HAsO4)
Ca WollastoniteCaSiO3
VVanadium
V PascoiteCa3(V10O28) · 17H2O
MnManganese
Mn HübneriteMnWO4
Mn Piemontite{Ca2}{Al2Mn3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
FeIron
Fe ArsenopyriteFeAsS
Fe BorniteCu5FeS4
Fe ChaidamuiteZnFe3+(SO4)2(OH) · 4H2O
Fe ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Fe Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Fe FerrimolybditeFe2(MoO4)3 · nH2O
Fe JarositeKFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
Fe MagnetiteFe2+Fe23+O4
Fe MarcasiteFeS2
Fe MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe PyrrhotiteFe7S8
Fe RozeniteFeSO4 · 4H2O
Fe ScoroditeFe3+AsO4 · 2H2O
Fe SymplesiteFe32+(AsO4)2 · 8H2O
CuCopper
Cu AktashiteCu6Hg3As4S12
Cu BorniteCu5FeS4
Cu ChalcociteCu2S
Cu ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Cu CopperCu
Cu CovelliteCuS
Cu Galkhaite(Cs,Tl)(Hg,Cu,Zn)6(As,Sb)4S12
Cu MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
ZnZinc
Zn ChaidamuiteZnFe3+(SO4)2(OH) · 4H2O
Zn Polhemusite(Zn,Hg)S
Zn SphaleriteZnS
AsArsenic
As AktashiteCu6Hg3As4S12
As ArsenicAs
As ArsenoliteAs2O3
As ArsenopyriteFeAsS
As ChristiteTlHgAsS3
As Galkhaite(Cs,Tl)(Hg,Cu,Zn)6(As,Sb)4S12
As GetchelliteAsSbS3
As GuériniteCa5(AsO4)2(HAsO4)2 · 9H2O
As HaidingeriteCaHAsO4 · H2O
As JordanitePb14(As,Sb)6S23
As LaffittiteAgHgAsS3
As LoránditeTlAsS2
As OrpimentAs2S3
As PararealgarAs4S4
As PharmacoliteCa(HAsO4) · 2H2O
As PicropharmacoliteCa4Mg(AsO4)2(HAsO4)2 · 11H2O
As RauenthaliteCa3(AsO4)2 · 10H2O
As RealgarAs4S4
As ScoroditeFe3+AsO4 · 2H2O
As SymplesiteFe32+(AsO4)2 · 8H2O
As TvalchrelidzeiteHg3SbAsS3
As Wakabayashilite[(As,Sb)6S9][As4S5]
As WeiliteCa(HAsO4)
MoMolybdenum
Mo FerrimolybditeFe2(MoO4)3 · nH2O
Mo IlsemanniteMo3O8 · nH2O
Mo MolybdeniteMoS2
AgSilver
Ag AcanthiteAg2S
Ag Electrum(Au, Ag)
Ag LaffittiteAgHgAsS3
Ag SilverAg
SnTin
Sn CassiteriteSnO2
SbAntimony
Sb GetchelliteAsSbS3
Sb JordanitePb14(As,Sb)6S23
Sb KermesiteSb2S2O
Sb MetastibniteSb2S3
Sb StibiconiteSb3+Sb25+O6(OH)
Sb StibniteSb2S3
Sb TvalchrelidzeiteHg3SbAsS3
Sb Wakabayashilite[(As,Sb)6S9][As4S5]
TeTellurium
Te ColoradoiteHgTe
CsCaesium
Cs Galkhaite(Cs,Tl)(Hg,Cu,Zn)6(As,Sb)4S12
BaBarium
Ba BaryteBaSO4
WTungsten
W HübneriteMnWO4
W ScheeliteCa(WO4)
AuGold
Au Electrum(Au, Ag)
Au GoldAu
HgMercury
Hg AktashiteCu6Hg3As4S12
Hg ChristiteTlHgAsS3
Hg CinnabarHgS
Hg ColoradoiteHgTe
Hg Galkhaite(Cs,Tl)(Hg,Cu,Zn)6(As,Sb)4S12
Hg LaffittiteAgHgAsS3
Hg MetacinnabarHgS
Hg Polhemusite(Zn,Hg)S
Hg TvalchrelidzeiteHg3SbAsS3
TlThallium
Tl ChristiteTlHgAsS3
Tl LoránditeTlAsS2
PbLead
Pb GalenaPbS
Pb JordanitePb14(As,Sb)6S23
Pb MassicotPbO
BiBismuth
Bi BismuthiniteBi2S3
UUranium
U Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Permian - Devonian
251.902 - 419.2 Ma



ID: 3186322
Paleozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks

Age: Phanerozoic (251.902 - 419.2 Ma)

Lithology: Carbonate-sandstone-chert

Reference: Chorlton, L.B. Generalized geology of the world: bedrock domains and major faults in GIS format: a small-scale world geology map with an extended geological attribute database. doi: 10.4095/223767. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 5529. [154]

Cambrian
485.4 - 541 Ma



ID: 2749553
Nolan Belt - Phyllite, schist, shale, thin-bedded limestone, chert, and siltstone

Age: Cambrian (485.4 - 541 Ma)

Stratigraphic Name: Bull Run Dolomite; Edgemont Formation; Dunderberg Shale; Swarbrick Formation; Emigrant Formation; Mule Spring Limestone; Preble Formation; Paradise Valley Chert; Schwin Formation

Description: Shale, thin-bedded limestone, phyllite, hornfels, quartzite, chert, and siltstone are typical of this Cambrian unit which exhibits regional metamorphism suggesting significant burial depths have heated and recrystallized many of these rocks. This unit includes rocks mapped informally as the Bull Run Dolomite and Edgemont Formation in northern Elko County by Ehman (1985); the Crane Canyon sequence in the Toiyabe Range; some regions mapped as Dunderberg Shale; and the Swarbrick Formation in northern Nye County, the Emigrant Formation in southern Nye and Esmeralda Counties, the Mule Spring Limestone in Esmeralda County, the Preble Formation in Humboldt and Pershing Counties (Madden-McGuire, 1991), the Paradise Valley Chert in Humboldt County, and the Schwin Formation (Gilluly and Gates, 1965) in the Shoshone Range in Lander County. In most exposures this unit lies transitionally above the Cambrian-Precambrian quartzite unit CZq. In places this unit is transitional into OCtd. This unit is also in structural contact with DCs, DOts, OCc, OCtd, CZq, the Golconda terrane (GC), and the Dutch Flat terrane (DF). In the Osgood Mountains (Boskie and Schweickert, 2001; Crafford and Grauch, 2002; Madden-McGuire and Marsh, 1991), the Bull Run Mountains (Ehman, 1985), the Toiyabe Range (Means, 1962), and the Miller Mountain area (Oldow, 1984b) these rocks exhibit complex polyphase deformation with a strong west-vergent component. At Edna Mountain near Golconda in Humboldt County, these rocks are unconformably overlain by both Pacl and PIPacl of the Siliciclastic overlap assemblage.

Comments: Original map source: Crafford, A.E.J., 2007, Geologic Map of Nevada: U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 249, 1 CD-ROM, 46 p., 1 plate; Scale 1:250,000.

Reference: Horton, J.D., C.A. San Juan, and D.B. Stoeser. The State Geologic Map Compilation (SGMC) geodatabase of the conterminous United States. doi: 10.3133/ds1052. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1052. [133]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License

References

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Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Hardy, R.A. (1940) Geology of the Getchell Mine, AIME Technical Publication No. 1240, 3 pp.
Wise, F. and Wark, C.W. (1940) Metallurgy and milling practice at Getchell Mine, AIME Technical Publication 1260, 9 pp.
Erickson, R.L., Marranzino, A.P., Oda-Uteana, and Janes, W.W. (1964) Geochemical exploration near the Getchell Mine, Humboldt County, Nevada, USGS Bulletin 1198-A, 26 pp.
Weissberg, B.G. (1965) Getchellite, AsSbS3, a new mineral from Humboldt County, Nevada. American Mineralogist: 50: 1817-1826.
Jungles, G. (1974) Galkhaite: A newly described mineral from Siberia found at the Getchell mine, Nevada. Mineralogical Record: 5: 290-291.
First Mississippi Corp., Annual Reports for fiscal years (1983), 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991.
Nakai, I. & Appleman, D.E. (1983) Laffitite, AgHgAsS3, crystal structure & second occurrence from the Getchell Mine, Nevada, American Mineralogist: 68: 235-244
Berger, B.R. (1985) Geological and geochemical relationships at the Getchell Mine and vicinity, Humboldt County, Nevada, in Hollister, V. F., ed., Discoveries of epithermal precious metal deposits, case histories of mineral discoveries vol. 1, Society of Mining Engineers, New York: 51-59.
Berger, B.R. and Tingley, J.V. (1985) History of discovery, mining, exploration of the Getchell mine, Humboldt County, Nevada, in Hollister, V. F., ed., Discoveries of epithermal precious metal deposits, case histories of mineral discoveries vol. 1, Society of Mining Engineers, New York: 49-51.
Stolburg, C.S. and Dunning, G.E. (1985) The Getchell Mine, Humboldt Co. Mineralogical Record: 16(1): 15-23.
Dunning, Gail E. (1988) calcium arsenate minerals new to the Getchell Mine, Nevada, The Mineralogical Record: 19(4): 253-257.
Anthony, Bideaux, Bladh, Nichols (1990) "Handbook of Mineralogy", Vol. 1.
Bagby, W.C. and Cline, J.S. (1991) Constraints on the pressure of formation of the Getchell gold deposit, Humboldt County, Nevada, as interpreted from secondary-fluid-inclusion data, in Raines, G. L., et al, eds., Geology and Ore Deposits of the Great Basin, The Geological Society of Nevada, Reno: 793-804.
Madden-McGuire, D.J. (1991) Stratigraphy of the limestone-bearing part of the lower Cambrian to lower Ordovician Preble Formation near its type locality, Humboldt County, North Central Nevada, in Raines, G. L., et al, eds., Geology and Ore Deposits of the Great Basin, The Geological Society of Nevada, Reno: 875-893.
McCollum, L.B. and McCollum, M. (1991) Paleozoic rocks of the Osgood Mountains, Nevada, in Raines, G. L., et al, eds., Geology and Ore Deposits of the Great Basin, The Geological Society of Nevada, Reno: 735-738.
Economic Geology (1993) 88: 171-185.
Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology (1994) MI-1993.
Nevada Division of Minerals (1994).
Economic Geology (1997) 92: 601-622.
Long, K.R., DeYoung, J.H., Jr., and Ludington, S.D. (1998) Database of significant deposits of gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc in the United States; Part A, Database description and analysis; part B, Digital database: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 98-206, 33 p., one 3.5 inch diskette.
Bowell, R.J., Baumann, M., Gingrich, M., Tretbar, D., Perkins, W.F., and Fisher, P.C. (1999) The occurrence of gold at the Getchell mine, Nevada. Journal of Geochemical Exploration: 67: 127-143.
Cline, J.S. (2001) Timing of gold and arsenic sulfide mineral deposition at the Getchell Carlin-type gold deposit, north-central Nevada. Economic Geology: 96: 75-89.
Placer Dome Gold Company website (2003).
USGS (2005) Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10045077, 10149626, 10173820, 10222671, 10222786 [mill], 10310488.
Getchell - Internet report by Porter eoconsultancy.
Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Special Publication 31, Minerals of Nevada.

Mindat Articles

Getchell Mine, Humboldt County Nevada by Rolf Luetcke


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