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Schuyler Copper Mine (Schuyler Mine; Arlington Mine), North Arlington, Bergen Co., New Jersey, USA

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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 40° 47' 18'' North , 74° 8' 1'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 40.78833,-74.13361
Köppen climate type:Cfa : Humid subtropical climate


Located under a residential area of North Arlington. Claimed to be the oldest mine in the USA, opened in 1715 (about 1719). Ore was packed in barrels and shipped to England for smelting due to restrictions on smelting in the colonies. Had the first steam engine, imported from England, used to pump a mine in North America. Reopened 1859 and ultimately closed 1865. Ore was in mineralized, unaltered, gray arkosic sandstone in red sandstone in the proximity of trap dikes (Palisades diabase). Ore contained 4.4 oz. silver per ton plus would yield a gold bead. Workings featured the Victoria shaft at 347 feet deep. Also had 2 inclines (220 feet & 80 feet).


Commodity List

This is a list of exploitable or exploited mineral commodities recorded at this locality.


Mineral List


12 valid minerals.

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Late Jurassic - Early Jurassic
145 - 201.3 Ma



ID: 2735492
Passaic Formation Sandstone and Siltstone facies

Age: Jurassic (145 - 201.3 Ma)

Stratigraphic Name: Passaic Formation

Description: Sandstone (JTrps) is interbedded grayish-red to brownish-red, medium- to fine-grained, medium- to thick-bedded sandstone and brownish-to-purplish-red coarse-grained siltstone; unit is planar to ripple cross-laminated, fissile, locally calcareous, containing desiccation cracks and root casts. Upward-fining cycles are 1.8 to 4.6 m (6-15 ft) thick. Sandstone beds are coarser and thicker near conglomerate units (JTrpcq, JTrpcl). Maximum thickness about 1,100 m (3,610 ft).

Comments: Newark Supergroup, Brunswick Group (Lyttle and Epstein, 1987). The Passaic Formation unit description on the map encompasses multiple units (JTRp, JTRpms, JTRps, JTRpsc, JTRpcq, JTRpcl, and TRpg). The Passaic Formation was split into individual units according to the digital map and the appropriate descriptions were used for each. Names for units are from digital map.

Lithology: Major:{sandstone,siltstone}

Reference: Horton, J.D., C.A. San Juan, and D.B. Stoeser. The State Geologic Map Compilation (SGMC) geodatabase of the conterminous United States. doi: 10.3133/ds1052. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1052. [133]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License



This page contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.

References

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New Jersey State Geologist's Annual Report (1906): 140-142.
American Mineralogist (1929): 14: 309-311.
Manchester, J.G. (1931), The Minerals of New York City & Its Environs, New York Mineralogical Club Bulletin 3, No. 1: 34.

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