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Hollister prospects (Hollister Quarry), South Glastonbury, Glastonbury, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAi
Regional Level Types
Hollister prospects (Hollister Quarry)Group of Prospects
South Glastonbury- not defined -
Glastonbury- not defined -
Hartford Co.County
ConnecticutState
USACountry

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Key
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
41° 38' 34'' North , 72° 35' 23'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Locality type:
Group of Prospects
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Glastonbury Center7,387 (2017)6.5km
Cromwell13,750 (2017)7.0km
Glastonbury31,876 (2017)7.9km
Lake Pocotopaug3,436 (2017)8.2km
Portland5,862 (2017)8.8km


There are three granite pegmatites here, known as the northern, middle and southern pegmatites, only the northern and southern were prospected. The northern quarry is best known for elbaite, lepidolite and rare red fluorite, the southern quarry has excellent microlite and rare gahnite. Note: Stugard's (1958) placement of Hollister at his pegmatite 69 (Table 8, p. 646) is too far west according to Betts (1999).

The best description is given by Cameron and others (1954):

The prospect is on a tract of 30 acres owned by Dino L. Bertolini, 815 State Street, New Haven, Conn. The property is said to have been worked briefly for feldspar about 1930. It was prospected for feldspar and mica for several months in the spring of 1943 by Fausto Bertolini, 815 State Street, New Haven. The property was mapped by E. N. Cameron and V. E. Shainin in March 1943 (fig. 122). At that time the workings consisted of seven small excavations. The northernmost and largest was an opencut 65 feet long, 20 feet wide and 15 feet in maximum depth.

Three pegmatites, each striking due north, are shown on figure 122, but the northern pegmatite may be connected with either the southernmost or the middle pegmatite. The wallrock is Monson gneiss, the foliation of which strikes northward and dips gently westward.

Northern pegmatite. - The northern pegmatite, exposed for about 240 feet along strike, has an outcrop width of about 25 feet. The pegmatite probably dips steeply eastward. The pegmatite is roughly parallel to the strike of the wallrock foliation but differs markedly in dip. The bulk of the pegmatite consists of medium- to coarse-grained quartz, [microcline] perthite, graphic granite, plagioclase [albite}, in various proportions, with subordinate muscovite and accessory garnet [most likely almandine], tourmaline, beryl, and columbite-tantalite. In the south pits, this material seems to enclose small pods consisting of coarse [microcline] perthite, quartz, graphic granite, and muscovite, with minor plagioclase [albite], scattered crystals of beryl, and tourmaline, and traces of columbite-tantalite. In the quarry at the north end of the area mapped, a border zone 18 inches thick, consisting essentially of line- to medium-grained quartz and plagioclase [albite], lies along the west wall.

Near the east end of the headwall of the quarry and along the east wall, the pegmatite is cut by a tabular fracture-controlled replacement body, 4 inches to 2 feet thick. This body strikes N. 2° W. and dips 69° E., and extends across the headwall from top to bottom and northward along the base of the east wall to a point about 20 feet from the headwall, where it passes under overburden. It consists of book muscovite, plagioclase [albite], and quartz. The east margin of the body is even, nearly straight, the west margin is highly irregular, as it is defined by the outer ends of muscovite books that project various distances into the adjacent pegmatite. The books are mostly arranged with cleavages perpendicular to the walls of the body or nearly so. In the overlying pegmatite a faint layering parallel to the fracture-controlled body is visible owing to alignment of small garnet [most likely almandine] crystals in discontinuous streaks. The garnet is associated with sugary plagioclase [albite], quartz, and small muscovite crystals, and the whole group of minerals appears to have formed by replacement of the perthite-plagioclase-quartz pegmatite.

In the headwall of the quarry the pegmatite is cut by a reverse fault that strikes N. 17° E. and dips 20° to 33° W. The apparent displacement along it is not more than a few feet. It is marked by a crush zone filled with gouge and fragments of pegmatite.

Muscovite books from the northern pegmatite range from 2 inches to more than 1 foot in diameter, and from ¼ inch to 4 inches in thickness. Most of the books are hard, and free splitting, but they are marred by ruling, cross fracturing, and, less commonly, by “A” structure. The books seem to contain a satisfactory percentage of sheet mica, but as they range from fair-stained to heavy-stained only a small part of the sheet recovered would be of No. 1 and No. 2 qualities. The stain is of the grating type and probably due to magnetite.

Beryl is unevenly disseminated through the [microcline] perthite-plagioclase[albite]-quartz pegmatite in green to yellow-green prisms in part intergrown with quartz and [albite] plagioclase, and as scattered crystals associated with the pod in the south pit. Most of the beryl is in crystals 0.1 and 0.4 inch in diameter and less than 1 inch long, but crystals as much as 2 inches in diameter and 4 inches long are present. A real measurement of 80 beryl crystals exposed in 142.9 square feet of the headwall of the northernmost cut indicated a beryl content of 0.09 percent...

Middle pegmatite. - The middle pegmatite is poorly exposed and has not been studied in detail. It appears to resemble the northern pegmatite in mineral composition.

Southern pegmatite. - The southern pegmatite is exposed at intervals for 160 feet. It is 4 to 9 feet wide and seems to be almost vertical. Its walls are irregular. It consists of smoky quartz, [microcline] perthite, massive plagioclase [albite], cleavelandite, garnet [most likely almandine], beryl and traces of lepidolite and columbite tantalite. The mica occurs along small pods of coarse-grained quartz.

Mica in the southern pegmatite is similar to that from the northern pegmatite. Beryl, in crystals ¼ to 2 inches in diameter and ½ to 5 inches long, is associated with quartz and cleavelandite, and is very unevenly distributed. Measurements of beryl crystals exposed in 74 square feet of pegmatite indicate a beryl content of about 0.11 percent.

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


21 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Albite
Formula: Na(AlSi3O8)
Colour: white, pale blue
Description: Major component of the pegmatites. Nearly all anhedral and massive, but some rare euhedral overgrowths (colored pale blue by tiny included capillary tourmaline) on brecciated microcline and albite.
Reference: Cameron et al. (1954) USGS Professional Paper 255; Rocks & Minerals (1995) 70:396-409
Albite var: Cleavelandite
Formula: Na(AlSi3O8)
Habit: tabular
Colour: white
Description: Crystals are thin and fragile in the northern prospect, thicker and chunkier in the southern prospect.
Reference: Cameron et al. (1954) USGS Professional Paper 255
'Allanite Group' ?
Formula: {A12+REE3+}{M3+2M32+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Description: Listed in Table 1 of Betts (1999) with a question mark.
Reference: Betts, John. (1999): The Quarries and Minerals of the Dayton Road District, South Glastonbury, Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals. Volume 74, Number 2. pp. 110-121
Almandine
Formula: Fe2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Description: An accessory in the pegmatites, mostly small crystals in sugary albitite. While the reference is not specific to species, analyses show that most garnet in pegmatites in the district is almandine.
Reference: Cameron et al. (1954) USGS Professional Paper 255; Betts (1999)
Annite ?
Formula: KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Description: fka: biotite; listed on Table 1 of Betts (1999) with a question mark. List in Januzzi (1976) is copied from Schooner (1958) and provides no additional details.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p.148; Betts (1999)
Autunite
Formula: Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
Reference: Ryerson, Kathleen, H. Rock Hounds Guide to Connecticut, 1972
Beryl
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Habit: elongated prisms
Colour: green to yellow-green
Description: Most of the beryl is in crystals 0.1 and 0.4 inch in diameter and less than 1 inch long, but crystals as much as 2 inches in diameter and 4 inches long are present. (Cameron, 1954)
Reference: Rocks & Minerals (1995): 70: 398.;
Beryl var: Morganite
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Reference: Former Bob Albanese collection.
Cassiterite
Formula: SnO2
Reference: Rocks & Minerals (1995): 70: 398.
'Columbite-(Fe)-Columbite-(Mn) Series'
Habit: prismatic
Colour: black with iridescence
Description: Typically small prisms less than 3 cm. Species is unconfirmed by analyses but most black columbite-tantalite in the district is opaque and black.
Reference: Betts (1999)
'Columbite-Tantalite'
Description: Accessory in the pegmatite.
Reference: Cameron et al. (1954) USGS Professional Paper 255
Elbaite
Formula: Na(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Habit: elongated prisms
Colour: pink, dark blue, green
Description: Commonly pink, some dark blue and green. Typically opaque and unterminated.
Reference: Betts (1999); Rocks & Minerals (1995): 70: 398.
Fluorapatite
Formula: Ca5(PO4)3F
Colour: pale greenish-gray
Description: An accessory in the pegmatites.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p.148
Fluorite
Formula: CaF2
Habit: mostly massive, rarely octahedral
Colour: Light pink to dark red
Fluorescence: blue-green
Description: Occurs as small masses or octahedra (which typically crumble) in the northern pegmatite.
Reference: Personally collected by Kevin Czaja.
Fluorite var: Chlorophane
Formula: CaF2
Habit: massive to crudely octahedral
Colour: pink to dark red
Fluorescence: blue-green
Description: Crystals or masses typically crumble so rarely intact or on matrix.
Reference: Kevin Czaja Collection
Gahnite
Formula: ZnAl2O4
Habit: octahedral
Colour: dark green
Description: Usually small octahedra less than about 1 cm, associated with cleavelandite and very dark smoky quartz in the southern pegmatite. According to Schooner (1958), Mary E. Mrose, of the U. S. Geological Survey, established the identity of this material by an x-ray diffraction test.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p.148; Schooner (1958)
'Lepidolite'
Habit: massive granular
Colour: lavender to gray
Description: As aggregates of massive fine grains or as overgrowths/replacements on muscovite.
Reference: Rocks & Minerals (1995): 70: 398.; Cameron et al. (1954) USGS Professional Paper 255
Microcline
Formula: K(AlSi3O8)
Description: Major component of the pegmatites.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p.148; Cameron et al. (1954) USGS Professional Paper 255
'Microlite Group'
Formula: A2-mTa2X6-wZ-n
Habit: octahedral with dodecahedral and cubic modifications
Colour: pale to dark brown to black, yellow-green
Description: Crystals up to "almost half an inch" (Schooner, 1958) associated with cleavelandite and very dark smoky quartz in the southern pegmatite.
Reference: Betts, John. (1999): The Quarries and Minerals of the Dayton Road District, South Glastonbury, Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals. Volume 74, Number 2. pp. 110-121.; Schooner (1958)
'Monazite'
Reference: Betts, John. (1999): The Quarries and Minerals of the Dayton Road District, South Glastonbury, Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals. Volume 74, Number 2. pp. 110-121
Muscovite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Habit: subhedral tabular
Colour: silvery to greenish
Description: 2 inches to more than 1 foot in diameter, and from ¼ inch to 4 inches in thickness (Cameron, 1954). Commonly fractured and cleaved into rhombic or triangular sections.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p.148; Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255.
Opal
Formula: SiO2 · nH2O
Colour: colorless, light gray
Fluorescence: green
Description: As thin, slightly bubbly-textured encrustations, usually not obvious until illuminated by SW UV, which shows the bright green fluorescence.
Reference: Betts, John. (1999): The Quarries and Minerals of the Dayton Road District, South Glastonbury, Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals. Volume 74, Number 2. pp. 110-121
Opal var: Opal-AN
Formula: SiO2 · nH2O
Colour: colorless, light gray
Fluorescence: green
Description: As thin, slightly bubbly-textured encrustations, usually not obvious until illuminated by SW UV, which shows the bright green fluorescence.
Reference: Betts, John. (1999): The Quarries and Minerals of the Dayton Road District, South Glastonbury, Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals. Volume 74, Number 2. pp. 110-121
Pollucite ?
Formula: (Cs,Na)2(Al2Si4O12) · 2H2O
Description: Reference includes a list of minerals identical to Schooner (1958). No details provided.
Reference: Januzzi, R.E. and Seaman, David M. (1976) Mineral Localities Of Connecticut and Southern New York State and Pegmatite Minerals of the World, p.148.
Pyrite ?
Formula: FeS2
Description: Reference includes a list of minerals identical to Schooner (1958). No details provided.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p.148
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Habit: massive
Description: Major component of the pegmatites.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p.148; USGS Prof Paper 255
Quartz var: Smoky Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Habit: massive
Colour: gray to nearly black
Description: Nearly black in the southern pegmatite where associated with cleavelandite.
Reference: Cameron et al (1954): USGS Prof Paper 255
Rutile
Formula: TiO2
Reference: Betts, John. (1999): The Quarries and Minerals of the Dayton Road District, South Glastonbury, Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals. Volume 74, Number 2. pp. 110-121
Rutile var: Strüverite
Formula: (Ti,Ta,Fe)O2
Reference: Betts, John. (1999): The Quarries and Minerals of the Dayton Road District, South Glastonbury, Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals. Volume 74, Number 2. pp. 110-121
Samarskite-(Y) ?
Formula: YFe3+Nb2O8
Description: References includes a list of minerals with no details provided.
Reference: Rocks & Minerals (1995): 70: 398; Betts (1999)
Schorl
Formula: Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Habit: elongated prisms
Colour: black
Description: Common accessory in the pegmatites.
Reference: Rocks & Minerals (1995): 70: 398.; Cameron et al (1954): USGS Prof Paper 255
Spessartine ?
Formula: Mn2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Habit: trapezohedral
Colour: orange-brown
Description: Reference includes a list identical to Schooner (1958) with no details. Species is speculative and not supported by analyses, which show the pegmatitic garnet in the district is typically almandine. Schooner (1958) states: "collected a superb specimen of intergrown one inch orange-brown trapezohedra... resembling essonite".
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p.148; Schooner (1958)
'Tourmaline'
Formula: A(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
Habit: capilllary
Colour: black to pale blue
Description: Associated with rare euhedral albite overgrowths, on brecciated microcline and albite, which the capillary tourmaline colors a pale blue due to its inclusion.
Reference: Harold Moritz collection
Xenotime-(Y) ?
Formula: Y(PO4)
Reference: Betts, John. (1999): The Quarries and Minerals of the Dayton Road District, South Glastonbury, Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals: 74(2): 110-121.

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Pyrite ?2.EB.05aFeS2
Group 3 - Halides
Fluorite3.AB.25CaF2
var: Chlorophane3.AB.25CaF2
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Cassiterite4.DB.05SnO2
Gahnite4.BB.05ZnAl2O4
'Microlite Group'4.00.A2-mTa2X6-wZ-n
Opal4.DA.10SiO2 · nH2O
var: Opal-AN4.DA.10SiO2 · nH2O
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
var: Smoky Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Rutile4.DB.05TiO2
var: Strüverite4.DB.05(Ti,Ta,Fe)O2
Samarskite-(Y) ?4.DB.25YFe3+Nb2O8
Group 8 - Phosphates, Arsenates and Vanadates
Autunite8.EB.05Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
Fluorapatite8.BN.05Ca5(PO4)3F
Xenotime-(Y) ?8.AD.35Y(PO4)
Group 9 - Silicates
Albite9.FA.35Na(AlSi3O8)
var: Cleavelandite9.FA.35Na(AlSi3O8)
Almandine9.AD.25Fe2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Annite ?9.EC.20KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Beryl9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
var: Morganite9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Elbaite9.CK.05Na(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Microcline9.FA.30K(AlSi3O8)
Muscovite9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Pollucite ?9.GB.05(Cs,Na)2(Al2Si4O12) · 2H2O
Schorl9.CK.05Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Spessartine ?9.AD.25Mn2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Allanite Group' ?-{A12+REE3+}{M3+2M32+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
'Columbite-(Fe)-Columbite-(Mn) Series'-
'Columbite-Tantalite'-
'Lepidolite'-
'Monazite'-
'Tourmaline'-A(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Pyrite ?2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
AX2
Cassiterite4.4.1.5SnO2
Rutile4.4.1.1TiO2
var: Strüverite4.4.1.3(Ti,Ta,Fe)O2
Group 7 - MULTIPLE OXIDES
AB2X4
Gahnite7.2.1.4ZnAl2O4
Group 8 - MULTIPLE OXIDES CONTAINING NIOBIUM,TANTALUM OR TITANIUM
ABO4
Samarskite-(Y) ?8.1.11.1YFe3+Nb2O8
A2B2O6(O,OH,F)
'Microlite Group'8.2.2.1A2-mTa2X6-wZ-n
Group 9 - NORMAL HALIDES
AX2
Fluorite9.2.1.1CaF2
Group 40 - HYDRATED NORMAL PHOSPHATES,ARSENATES AND VANADATES
AB2(XO4)2·xH2O, containing (UO2)2+
Autunite40.2a.1.1Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
Group 41 - ANHYDROUS PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
A5(XO4)3Zq
Fluorapatite41.8.1.1Ca5(PO4)3F
Group 51 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups Only
Insular SiO4 Groups Only with cations in [6] and >[6] coordination
Almandine51.4.3a.2Fe2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Spessartine ?51.4.3a.3Mn2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Group 61 - CYCLOSILICATES Six-Membered Rings
Six-Membered Rings with [Si6O18] rings; possible (OH) and Al substitution
Beryl61.1.1.1Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Six-Membered Rings with borate groups
Elbaite61.3.1.8Na(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Schorl61.3.1.10Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Group 71 - PHYLLOSILICATES Sheets of Six-Membered Rings
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 2:1 layers
Annite ?71.2.2b.3KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Muscovite71.2.2a.1KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with H2O and organics
Opal75.2.1.1SiO2 · nH2O
Group 76 - TECTOSILICATES Al-Si Framework
Al-Si Framework with Al-Si frameworks
Albite76.1.3.1Na(AlSi3O8)
Microcline76.1.1.5K(AlSi3O8)
Group 77 - TECTOSILICATES Zeolites
Zeolite group - True zeolites
Pollucite ?77.1.1.2(Cs,Na)2(Al2Si4O12) · 2H2O
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
Albite
var: Cleavelandite
-Na(AlSi3O8)
'Allanite Group' ?-{A12+REE3+}{M3+2M32+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Beryl
var: Morganite
-Be3Al2(Si6O18)
'Columbite-(Fe)-Columbite-(Mn) Series'-
'Columbite-Tantalite'-
Fluorite
var: Chlorophane
-CaF2
'Lepidolite'-
'Monazite'-
Opal
var: Opal-AN
-SiO2 · nH2O
Quartz
var: Smoky Quartz
-SiO2
'Tourmaline'-A(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
Xenotime-(Y) ?-Y(PO4)

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
H MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H AutuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
H SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
H Opal (var: Opal-AN)SiO2 · nH2O
H OpalSiO2 · nH2O
H AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H Pollucite(Cs,Na)2(Al2Si4O12) · 2H2O
H Allanite Group{A12+REE3+}{M23+M32+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
LiLithium
Li ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
BeBeryllium
Be BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Be Beryl (var: Morganite)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
BBoron
B ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
B SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
B TourmalineA(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
OOxygen
O BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
O CassiteriteSnO2
O ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
O GahniteZnAl2O4
O MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
O AutuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
O Rutile (var: Strüverite)(Ti,Ta,Fe)O2
O Beryl (var: Morganite)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
O RutileTiO2
O SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
O FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
O AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
O Opal (var: Opal-AN)SiO2 · nH2O
O TourmalineA(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
O OpalSiO2 · nH2O
O AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
O MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
O QuartzSiO2
O Quartz (var: Smoky Quartz)SiO2
O Samarskite-(Y)YFe3+Nb2O8
O AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O Pollucite(Cs,Na)2(Al2Si4O12) · 2H2O
O SpessartineMn32+Al2(SiO4)3
O Xenotime-(Y)Y(PO4)
O Allanite Group{A12+REE3+}{M23+M32+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
FFluorine
F FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
F FluoriteCaF2
F Fluorite (var: Chlorophane)CaF2
NaSodium
Na ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Na Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
Na SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Na AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Na Pollucite(Cs,Na)2(Al2Si4O12) · 2H2O
AlAluminium
Al BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Al ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Al GahniteZnAl2O4
Al MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
Al Beryl (var: Morganite)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Al SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Al AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
Al AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Al MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
Al AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al Pollucite(Cs,Na)2(Al2Si4O12) · 2H2O
Al SpessartineMn32+Al2(SiO4)3
SiSilicon
Si BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Si ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Si MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
Si Beryl (var: Morganite)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Si SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Si AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
Si Opal (var: Opal-AN)SiO2 · nH2O
Si TourmalineA(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
Si OpalSiO2 · nH2O
Si AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Si MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
Si QuartzSiO2
Si Quartz (var: Smoky Quartz)SiO2
Si AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si Pollucite(Cs,Na)2(Al2Si4O12) · 2H2O
Si SpessartineMn32+Al2(SiO4)3
Si Allanite Group{A12+REE3+}{M23+M32+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
PPhosphorus
P AutuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
P FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
P Xenotime-(Y)Y(PO4)
SSulfur
S PyriteFeS2
KPotassium
K MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
K AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
CaCalcium
Ca AutuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
Ca FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
Ca FluoriteCaF2
Ca Fluorite (var: Chlorophane)CaF2
TiTitanium
Ti Rutile (var: Strüverite)(Ti,Ta,Fe)O2
Ti RutileTiO2
MnManganese
Mn SpessartineMn32+Al2(SiO4)3
FeIron
Fe Rutile (var: Strüverite)(Ti,Ta,Fe)O2
Fe SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Fe AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
Fe Samarskite-(Y)YFe3+Nb2O8
Fe AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Fe PyriteFeS2
ZnZinc
Zn GahniteZnAl2O4
YYttrium
Y Samarskite-(Y)YFe3+Nb2O8
Y Xenotime-(Y)Y(PO4)
NbNiobium
Nb Samarskite-(Y)YFe3+Nb2O8
SnTin
Sn CassiteriteSnO2
CsCaesium
Cs Pollucite(Cs,Na)2(Al2Si4O12) · 2H2O
TaTantalum
Ta Microlite GroupA2-mTa2X6-wZ-n
Ta Rutile (var: Strüverite)(Ti,Ta,Fe)O2
UUranium
U AutuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Cameron, Eugene N., David M. Larrabee, Andrew H. McNair, James T. Page, Glenn W. Stewart, and Vincent E. Shainin. (1954): Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; USGS Professional Paper 255.
Schooner, Richard. (1958): The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Stugard, Frederick, Jr. (1958): Pegmatites of the Middletown Area, Connecticut. USGS Bulletin 1042-Q.
Schooner, Richard. (1961): The Mineralogy of Connecticut. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Ryerson, Kathleen, H. (1972): Rock Hound’s Guide to Connecticut. Pequot Press.
Januzzi, Ronald E. (1976): Mineral Localities of Connecticut and Southeastern New York State. Mineralogical Press, Danbury, Connecticut 148.
Weber, Marcelle H. and Earle C. Sullivan. (1995): Connecticut Mineral Locality Index. Rocks & Minerals (Connecticut Issue): 70(6): 398.
Betts, John. (1996): The Quarries and Minerals of South Glastonbury, Connecticut. George F. Kunz Competition Papers 1996. New York Mineralogical Club.
Betts, John. (1999): The Quarries and Minerals of the Dayton Road District, South Glastonbury, Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals: 74(2): 110-121.

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