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Wesley Mine (Didsbury College Mine), Westbury on Trym, Bristol, England, UKi
Regional Level Types
Wesley Mine (Didsbury College Mine)Mine
Westbury on Trym- not defined -
BristolCounty
EnglandConstituent Country
UKCountry

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Key
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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 51° 30' 2'' North , 2° 37' 14'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 51.50056,-2.62083
GeoHash:G#: gcnhur7s6
UK National Grid Reference:ST569782
Locality type:Mine
Köppen climate type:Cfb : Temperate oceanic climate
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Easter Compton327 (2017)4.3km
Bristol617,280 (2018)5.3km
Stoke Gifford13,560 (2011)5.8km
Easton-in-Gordano4,824 (2011)6.1km
Almondsbury1,812 (2011)6.9km


A former manganese deposit, now inaccessible (completely covered by buildings).

Little is known about the original workings of "Wesley Mine", which were discovered by accident during excavations for an extension to the foundations of Wesley Theological College in 1983 (Alabaster, 1989). It is recorded that there was active mining for manganese, iron and lead in the Bristol area during the 17th, 18th and 19th Centuries, but the era and purpose of "Wesley Mine" remains unknown. There is a possibility that "Wesley Mine" corresponds to a site known to be active in 1756 called "Pope's Work", a small copper mine near Henbury where a man named Pope discovered a few small veins of copper-ore which he was exploiting (Catcott, 1756; Gough, 1930); however, there are reports of other unnamed workings for lead in the Henbury and Westbury-on-Trym region (Savage, 1989), that could also correspond to "Wesley Mine". For a complete overview of the geological setting and mineralogy of "Wesley Mine", consult the paper by Alabaster (1989).

Regions containing this locality

Eurasian PlateTectonic Plate
EuropeContinent
British IslesGroup of Islands

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


18 valid minerals. 1 (TL) - type locality of valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Baryte
Formula: BaSO4
Reference: BMS Database
Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Reference: Rumsey, M.S. (2008) The first British occurrence of Kombatite, Pb14(VO4)2O9Cl4, from the "Wesley Mine" near Westbury on Trym, Bristol. Journal of the Russell Society, vol. 11, 51-53.
Cerussite
Formula: PbCO3
Reference: BMS Database
Chloroxiphite
Formula: Pb3CuO2Cl2(OH)2
Reference: BMS Database
Crednerite
Formula: CuMnO2
Reference: BMS Database
Descloizite
Formula: PbZn(VO4)(OH)
Reference: BMS Database
Hydrocerussite
Formula: Pb3(CO3)2(OH)2
Reference: BMS Database
Kombatite
Formula: Pb14(VO4)2O9Cl4
Colour: bright orange
Description: A single grain about 2mm in length (initially identified as parkinsonite) embedded in calcite. The specimen, now registered at the NHM as specimen BM 1989,93, was identified by WDXRF. A further "orange parkinsonite" exists at the NHM as BM 1989,94, which will be investigated in due course.
Reference: Rumsey, M.S. (2008) The First British occurrence of Kombatite; Pb14[O9(VO4)2Cl4] from the “Wesley Mine” near Westbury on Trym, Bristol. Journal of the Russell Society, vol. 11, pp 51-53.
Laurionite
Formula: PbCl(OH)
Reference: BMS Database
'Manganese Oxides'
Reference: Rumsey, M.S. (2008) The first British occurrence of Kombatite, Pb14(VO4)2O9Cl4, from the "Wesley Mine" near Westbury on Trym, Bristol. Journal of the Russell Society, vol. 11, 51-53.
Mendipite
Formula: Pb3Cl2O2
Reference: BMS Database
Mereheadite
Formula: Pb47Cl25(OH)13O24(CO3)(BO3)2
Reference: BMS Database
Paralaurionite
Formula: PbCl(OH)
Reference: BMS Database
Parkinsonite (TL)
Formula: Pb7MoO9Cl2
Type Locality:
Colour: red
Description: all the “orange parkinsonites” from “Wesley Mine” are likely to be kombatite and not parkinsonite, which probably corresponds only to the deeper blood-red samples.
Reference: BMS Database; Symes, R.F., Cressey, G., Griddle, A.J., Stanley, C.J., Francis, J.G., and Jones, G.C. (1994) Parkinsonite, (Pb,Mo,□)8O8Cl2, a new mineral from Merehead Quarry, Somerset. Mineralogical Magazine, vol. 58, n° 390, 59-68.; Rumsey, M.S. (2008) The first British occurrence of Kombatite, Pb14(VO4)2O9Cl4, from the "Wesley Mine" near Westbury on Trym, Bristol. Journal of the Russell Society, vol. 11, 51-53.
Phosgenite
Formula: Pb2CO3Cl2
Reference: BMS Database
Rickturnerite
Formula: Pb7O4[Mg(OH)4](OH)Cl3
Habit: Fibrous
Colour: white, clear, pale yellow
Description: The 'fibrous oxychloride' mentioned in Alabaster's 1989 paper on this locality was found to be rickturnerite, after this mineral had been described from Torr Works (Merehead) Quarry (q.v.). At the Wesley Mine, rickturnerite forms small masses of white fibres, some of which are stained yellow, presumably by a Pb oxide mineral.
Reference: Turner, R.W. and Rumsey, M.S. (2010): Mineral Relationships in the Mendip Hills. Journal of the Russell Society, vol 13, pp 3-46;
Sahlinite ?
Formula: Pb14(AsO4)2O9Cl4
Description: Rumsey (2008):
"Probable vanadium rich parkinsonites are known to exist from Kombat Mine, Namibia (Welch et al., 1996; C. Stanley, personal communication) so it is feasible that some samples from "Wesley Mine" may also fall in between the two species. Interestingly, as Mo(VI) and V(V) occupy different structural sites within the two minerals, it is thought that V-rich parkinsonites are composed of intercalated, yet, distinct, layers of kombatite and parkinsonite at an atomic scale, and does not represent a solid solution. However, as As(V) and V(V) do occupy the same site, it is possible that the As-rich, Mo-poor analyses observed in this study (Table 1) may dominantly represent true solid solution between kombatite and sahlinite, rather than intercalated layers of each. After calculating site occupancy from wt% data, analysis indicates that the vanadium site is occupied here by 48.4% V, 46.2% As, 3.6% Cr and 1.7% Si. This is very nearly As(V) dominant and opens up the possibility that other examples from the "Wesley Mine" may be As dominant and would thus be correctly identified as the rare mineral sahlinite." "After the submission of this paper, qualitative EDX analysis upon an irregular fragment of a similar grain with a yellowish hue on the second specimen, revealed a chemistry dominated by Pb, Cl, As & O without any vanadium. This grain is now a candidate for an occurrence of sahlinite at "Wesley Mine" and both WDX and XRD analysis will be performed upon it at a later date. These results will be published in a future volume of the Journal of the Russell Society."
Reference: Rumsey, M.S. (2008) The first British occurrence of Kombatite, Pb14(VO4)2O9Cl4, from the "Wesley Mine" near Westbury on Trym, Bristol. Journal of the Russell Society, vol. 11, 51-53.
Vanadinite
Formula: Pb5(VO4)3Cl
Reference: BMS Database
Wulfenite
Formula: Pb(MoO4)
Reference: BMS Database

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 3 - Halides
Chloroxiphite3.DB.30Pb3CuO2Cl2(OH)2
Laurionite3.DC.05PbCl(OH)
Mendipite3.DC.70Pb3Cl2O2
Mereheadite3.DC.45Pb47Cl25(OH)13O24(CO3)(BO3)2
Paralaurionite3.DC.05PbCl(OH)
Parkinsonite (TL)3.DB.40Pb7MoO9Cl2
Rickturnerite3.DB.Pb7O4[Mg(OH)4](OH)Cl3
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Crednerite4.AB.05CuMnO2
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Calcite5.AB.05CaCO3
Cerussite5.AB.15PbCO3
Hydrocerussite5.BE.10Pb3(CO3)2(OH)2
Phosgenite5.BE.20Pb2CO3Cl2
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
Baryte7.AD.35BaSO4
Wulfenite7.GA.05Pb(MoO4)
Group 8 - Phosphates, Arsenates and Vanadates
Descloizite8.BH.40PbZn(VO4)(OH)
Kombatite8.BO.20Pb14(VO4)2O9Cl4
Sahlinite ?8.BO.20Pb14(AsO4)2O9Cl4
Vanadinite8.BN.05Pb5(VO4)3Cl
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Manganese Oxides'-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 7 - MULTIPLE OXIDES
ABX2
Crednerite7.1.2.1CuMnO2
Group 10 - OXYHALIDES AND HYDROXYHALIDES
A(O,OH)Xq
Laurionite10.2.2.1PbCl(OH)
Paralaurionite10.2.3.1PbCl(OH)
A3(O,OH)2Xq
Mendipite10.3.1.1Pb3Cl2O2
Am(O,OH)pXq
Parkinsonite (TL)10.5.11.1Pb7MoO9Cl2
AmBn(O,OH)pXq
Chloroxiphite10.6.4.1Pb3CuO2Cl2(OH)2
Rickturnerite10.6.17.Pb7O4[Mg(OH)4](OH)Cl3
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
Cerussite14.1.3.4PbCO3
Group 16a - ANHYDROUS CARBONATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
Hydrocerussite16a.2.2.1Pb3(CO3)2(OH)2
Phosgenite16a.3.4.1Pb2CO3Cl2
Group 28 - ANHYDROUS ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4
Baryte28.3.1.1BaSO4
Group 41 - ANHYDROUS PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
(AB)m(XO4)pZq, where m:p > 4:1
Kombatite41.1.4.2Pb14(VO4)2O9Cl4
Sahlinite ?41.1.4.1Pb14(AsO4)2O9Cl4
(AB)2(XO4)Zq
Descloizite41.5.2.1PbZn(VO4)(OH)
A5(XO4)3Zq
Vanadinite41.8.4.3Pb5(VO4)3Cl
Group 48 - ANHYDROUS MOLYBDATES AND TUNGSTATES
AXO4
Wulfenite48.1.3.1Pb(MoO4)
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
'Manganese Oxides'-
Mereheadite-Pb47Cl25(OH)13O24(CO3)(BO3)2

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H ChloroxiphitePb3CuO2Cl2(OH)2
H DescloizitePbZn(VO4)(OH)
H HydrocerussitePb3(CO3)2(OH)2
H LaurionitePbCl(OH)
H MereheaditePb47Cl25(OH)13O24(CO3)(BO3)2
H ParalaurionitePbCl(OH)
H RickturneritePb7O4[Mg(OH)4](OH)Cl3
BBoron
B MereheaditePb47Cl25(OH)13O24(CO3)(BO3)2
CCarbon
C CerussitePbCO3
C HydrocerussitePb3(CO3)2(OH)2
C MereheaditePb47Cl25(OH)13O24(CO3)(BO3)2
C PhosgenitePb2CO3Cl2
C CalciteCaCO3
OOxygen
O ParkinsonitePb7MoO9Cl2
O BaryteBaSO4
O CerussitePbCO3
O ChloroxiphitePb3CuO2Cl2(OH)2
O CredneriteCuMnO2
O DescloizitePbZn(VO4)(OH)
O HydrocerussitePb3(CO3)2(OH)2
O LaurionitePbCl(OH)
O MendipitePb3Cl2O2
O MereheaditePb47Cl25(OH)13O24(CO3)(BO3)2
O ParalaurionitePbCl(OH)
O PhosgenitePb2CO3Cl2
O VanadinitePb5(VO4)3Cl
O WulfenitePb(MoO4)
O KombatitePb14(VO4)2O9Cl4
O RickturneritePb7O4[Mg(OH)4](OH)Cl3
O CalciteCaCO3
O SahlinitePb14(AsO4)2O9Cl4
MgMagnesium
Mg RickturneritePb7O4[Mg(OH)4](OH)Cl3
SSulfur
S BaryteBaSO4
ClChlorine
Cl ParkinsonitePb7MoO9Cl2
Cl ChloroxiphitePb3CuO2Cl2(OH)2
Cl LaurionitePbCl(OH)
Cl MendipitePb3Cl2O2
Cl MereheaditePb47Cl25(OH)13O24(CO3)(BO3)2
Cl ParalaurionitePbCl(OH)
Cl PhosgenitePb2CO3Cl2
Cl VanadinitePb5(VO4)3Cl
Cl KombatitePb14(VO4)2O9Cl4
Cl RickturneritePb7O4[Mg(OH)4](OH)Cl3
Cl SahlinitePb14(AsO4)2O9Cl4
CaCalcium
Ca CalciteCaCO3
VVanadium
V DescloizitePbZn(VO4)(OH)
V VanadinitePb5(VO4)3Cl
V KombatitePb14(VO4)2O9Cl4
MnManganese
Mn CredneriteCuMnO2
CuCopper
Cu ChloroxiphitePb3CuO2Cl2(OH)2
Cu CredneriteCuMnO2
ZnZinc
Zn DescloizitePbZn(VO4)(OH)
AsArsenic
As SahlinitePb14(AsO4)2O9Cl4
MoMolybdenum
Mo ParkinsonitePb7MoO9Cl2
Mo WulfenitePb(MoO4)
BaBarium
Ba BaryteBaSO4
PbLead
Pb ParkinsonitePb7MoO9Cl2
Pb CerussitePbCO3
Pb ChloroxiphitePb3CuO2Cl2(OH)2
Pb DescloizitePbZn(VO4)(OH)
Pb HydrocerussitePb3(CO3)2(OH)2
Pb LaurionitePbCl(OH)
Pb MendipitePb3Cl2O2
Pb MereheaditePb47Cl25(OH)13O24(CO3)(BO3)2
Pb ParalaurionitePbCl(OH)
Pb PhosgenitePb2CO3Cl2
Pb VanadinitePb5(VO4)3Cl
Pb WulfenitePb(MoO4)
Pb KombatitePb14(VO4)2O9Cl4
Pb RickturneritePb7O4[Mg(OH)4](OH)Cl3
Pb SahlinitePb14(AsO4)2O9Cl4

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Late Cretaceous
66 - 100.5 Ma



ID: 3191056
Mesozoic sedimentary rocks

Age: Late Cretaceous (66 - 100.5 Ma)

Lithology: Sedimentary rocks

Reference: Chorlton, L.B. Generalized geology of the world: bedrock domains and major faults in GIS format: a small-scale world geology map with an extended geological attribute database. doi: 10.4095/223767. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 5529. [154]

Late Triassic - Middle Triassic
201.3 - 247.2 Ma



ID: 3152907
Middle Triassic claystone

Age: Triassic (201.3 - 247.2 Ma)

Lithology: Major:{claystone}, Minor{siltstone,sandstone,gypsum}

Reference: Asch, K. The 1:5M International Geological Map of Europe and Adjacent Areas: Development and Implementation of a GIS-enabled Concept. Geologisches Jahrbuch, SA 3. [147]

Mississippian
323.2 - 358.9 Ma



ID: 2036099
Dinantian Rocks (Undifferentiated)

Age: Mississippian (323.2 - 358.9 Ma)

Lithology: Limestone with subordinate sandstone and argillaceous rocks

Reference: British Geological Survey. DiGMapGB-625. British Geological Survey ©NERC. [23]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Catcott, A. (1756) Diary entry for 7th July 1756. In Gough, J.W. (1930) The Mines of Mendip. Clarendon Press, Oxford.
Gough J.W. (1930) The Mines of Mendip. Clarendon Press, Oxford.
Alabaster, C. (1989) The Wesley Mine; A further occurrence of manganese oxide-hosted lead oxychloride minerals in the Bristol district. Journal of the Russell Society, vol. 2, Part 2, 29-45.
Savage, R.J.G. (1989) Natural history of the Goldney Garden Grotto, Clifton, Bristol. Garden History, 17(1), 1-40.
Symes, R.F., Cressey, G., Griddle, A.J., Stanley, C.J., Francis, J.G., and Jones, G.C. (1994) Parkinsonite, (Pb,Mo,□)8O8Cl2, a new mineral from Merehead Quarry, Somerset. Mineralogical Magazine, vol. 58, n° 390, 59-68.
Rumsey, M.S. (2008) The first British occurrence of Kombatite, Pb14(VO4)2O9Cl4, from the "Wesley Mine" near Westbury on Trym, Bristol. Journal of the Russell Society, vol. 11, 51-53.
Turner, R.W. and Rumsey, M.S. (2010) Mineral Relationships in the Mendip Hills. Journal of the Russell Society, vol. 13, 3-46.


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