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Jan Coetzee Copper Mine, Okiep Copper District, Namakwa District (Namaqualand), Northern Cape, South Africai
Regional Level Types
Jan Coetzee Copper MineMine
Okiep Copper DistrictDistrict
Namakwa District (Namaqualand)District
Northern CapeProvince
South AfricaCountry

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Latitude & Longitude:
30° South , 19° East (est.)
Estimate based on other nearby localities or region boundaries.
Margin of Error:
~236km
Locality type:


Copper mine and one of the principal mines in this district, well known for large quartz crystals, located 11 km north of Nababeep.

The Jan Coetzee mine is one of the most famous in the district from the standpoint of mineral specimens, particularly large quartz crystals. It is located about 11 km north of Nababeep. The mine was originally worked as early as 1888 when it was prospected by the Cape Copper Company but then abandoned in 1907 (Anonymous, 1968). Three small adits, several prospecting pits and an 80 meter deep shaft were opened between 1888 and 1894. Some isolated ore bodies were discovered during these times, but no extractive mining was undertaken and the prospect was then abandoned in favor of the Flat Mine. It was re-opened in 1964 by the O'okiep Copper Company when ore reserves of 1.5 millions tons were proven. The mine is located on the farm Jan Coetzee Fontein, which was a portion of the original Nababeep farm. The mine finally closed in 1971. The mine was known by several names, Jan Coetzee's Fontein mine, Jan Coetzee's mine, Kotze's mine and Coetzee's mine.

When the small and relatively short-lived Jan Coetzee Mine was worked between 1964 and 1971, it produced 1,89 million tonnes at 1.06% copper. In 1966 a spectacular quartz crystal pocket was discovered in this mine (von Bezing and Kotze, 1993). Prior to this the mine had been rather unremarkable as far as specimen production was concerned: this find remains unique in the district. While tunnelling away from the shaft on the 88 m level, in a southerly direction, one of the miners, a Mr Kennedy noticed an area of decomposed rock on the sidewall of the drift. While testing for stability with a crowbar, he broke into a chamber measuring 12 x 12 metres across and some 6 metres high. The floor, walls and roof were covered by thousands of quartz crystals of all sizes. Most of the larger crystals were lying on the floor, partially imbedded in a layer of green chlorite 15 cm thick. Smaller second-generation clusters were coating the sidewalls and most of the crystal fragments.

A conservative estimate of the number of single crystals and clusters removed is about 50 000. The largest crystals measure 180 cm and weigh some 250 kg. Most major private and public collections in South Africa now have examples and many specimens have reached Europe and the United States. Large crystals have also been used as gate posts in front of a local hotel, others as decoration on graves! In all, several metric tonnes of quartz crystals were removed. The crystals are usually colorless to smoky, with green chlorite preferentially coating only some faces, dulling the crystals slightly. On the chlorite-coated faces gray calcite (rounded scalenohedra) and small (up to 1cm) prismatic, yellow barite crystals are found on most fragments: this combination makes specimens from the Jan Coetzee pocket easily identifiable. Minute crystals of chalcopyrite are also common, and these may reach 1cm in size. The larger quartz crystals are usually tapering prisms with evidence of basal tectonic fracture and rehealing, resulting in pseudo-doubly terminated crystals. Many of the second-generation quartz crystals are complex and distorted. Calcite, as a massive mineral or as crystals, was also found. As with so many mineral deposits, the mine is closed and the pocket no longer accessible. The dumps are closed to the public but in any event, do not yield any collectable specimens. Specimens still periodically become available from recycled collections.

Although the Jan Coetzee Mine is famous amongst collectors for its quartz crystals, other specimens of note have also been found here. These include chalcopyrite crystals, purple fluorite octahedra (up to 10 cm on edge), showy calcite specimens, sphalerite and dolomite. (Extract from Cairncross, 2004).

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Commodity List

This is a list of exploitable or exploited mineral commodities recorded at this locality.


Mineral List


12 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Baryte
Formula: BaSO4
Colour: orange-yellow
Description: As attractive orange-yelow crystals up to 2cm, studded on quartz crystals.
Reference: Von Bezing, K. L. and Kotze, J. (1993): The Jan Coetzee copper mine, Namaqualand, South Africa. Mineralogical Record, 24, 39-40
Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Reference: Min Rec 35:4 pp289-317
Chalcopyrite
Formula: CuFeS2
Reference: Min Rec 35:4 pp289-317
'Chlorite Group'
Reference: Min Rec 35:4 pp289-317
Dolomite
Formula: CaMg(CO3)2
Reference: Min Rec 35:4 pp289-317
Epidote
Formula: {Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Reference: Min Rec 35:4 pp289-317
Fluorite
Formula: CaF2
Reference: Min Rec 35:4 pp289-317
Hematite
Formula: Fe2O3
Reference: Min Rec 35:4 pp289-317
Orthoclase
Formula: K(AlSi3O8)
Reference: Min Rec 35:4 pp289-317
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Reference: Min Rec 35:4 pp289-317
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Reference: Min Rec 35:4 pp289-317
Sphalerite
Formula: ZnS
Reference: Min Rec 35:4 pp289-317
Titanite
Formula: CaTi(SiO4)O
Reference: Tony Peterson specimen - minID 5TU-G69.

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Chalcopyrite2.CB.10aCuFeS2
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Sphalerite2.CB.05aZnS
Group 3 - Halides
Fluorite3.AB.25CaF2
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Hematite4.CB.05Fe2O3
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Calcite5.AB.05CaCO3
Dolomite5.AB.10CaMg(CO3)2
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
Baryte7.AD.35BaSO4
Group 9 - Silicates
Epidote9.BG.05a{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Orthoclase9.FA.30K(AlSi3O8)
Titanite9.AG.15CaTi(SiO4)O
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Chlorite Group'-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Sphalerite2.8.2.1ZnS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:1
Chalcopyrite2.9.1.1CuFeS2
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
A2X3
Hematite4.3.1.2Fe2O3
Group 9 - NORMAL HALIDES
AX2
Fluorite9.2.1.1CaF2
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
AB(XO3)2
Dolomite14.2.1.1CaMg(CO3)2
Group 28 - ANHYDROUS ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4
Baryte28.3.1.1BaSO4
Group 52 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups and O,OH,F,H2O
Insular SiO4 Groups and O, OH, F, and H2O with cations in [6] and/or >[6] coordination
Titanite52.4.3.1CaTi(SiO4)O
Group 58 - SOROSILICATES Insular, Mixed, Single, and Larger Tetrahedral Groups
Insular, Mixed, Single, and Larger Tetrahedral Groups with cations in [6] and higher coordination; single and double groups (n = 1, 2)
Epidote58.2.1a.7{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Group 76 - TECTOSILICATES Al-Si Framework
Al-Si Framework with Al-Si frameworks
Orthoclase76.1.1.1K(AlSi3O8)
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
'Chlorite Group'-

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
CCarbon
C CalciteCaCO3
C DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
OOxygen
O QuartzSiO2
O CalciteCaCO3
O DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
O Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
O OrthoclaseK(AlSi3O8)
O HematiteFe2O3
O BaryteBaSO4
O TitaniteCaTi(SiO4)O
FFluorine
F FluoriteCaF2
MgMagnesium
Mg DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
AlAluminium
Al Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Al OrthoclaseK(AlSi3O8)
SiSilicon
Si QuartzSiO2
Si Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Si OrthoclaseK(AlSi3O8)
Si TitaniteCaTi(SiO4)O
SSulfur
S ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
S SphaleriteZnS
S PyriteFeS2
S BaryteBaSO4
KPotassium
K OrthoclaseK(AlSi3O8)
CaCalcium
Ca FluoriteCaF2
Ca CalciteCaCO3
Ca DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
Ca Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Ca TitaniteCaTi(SiO4)O
TiTitanium
Ti TitaniteCaTi(SiO4)O
FeIron
Fe ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Fe Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe HematiteFe2O3
CuCopper
Cu ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
ZnZinc
Zn SphaleriteZnS
BaBarium
Ba BaryteBaSO4

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Anonumous, (1968). Jan Coetzee mine. Copper-Nama News, Springbok, 5, No. 1 August 1968, 1-2.
Lombaard, A. F. and the Exploration Staff Of The Ookiep Copper Company Limited (1986): The copper deposits of the Okiep district, Namaqualand. In: Anhaeusser, C. R. and Maske, S. (Editors). Mineral Deposits of Southern Africa, Volume II, 1421-1445.
Von Bezing, K. L. and Kotze, J. (1993): The Jan Coetzee copper mine, Namaqualand, South Africa. Mineralogical Record, 24, 39-40.
Cairncross, B. (2004): History of The Okiep Copper District, Namaqualand, Northern Cape Province, South Africa. Mineralogical Record 35(4) 289-317.


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