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Santo Nino Mine (Santo Niño Mine; North Santo Nino; North Santo Wind; Brooks; Santa Maria Mo Mine), Santo Niño Mine area, San Antonio Canyon, Washington Camp-Duquesne District, Patagonia District, Patagonia Mts, Santa Cruz Co., Arizona, USAi
Regional Level Types
Santo Nino Mine (Santo Niño Mine; North Santo Nino; North Santo Wind; Brooks; Santa Maria Mo Mine)Mine
Santo Niño Mine areaArea
San Antonio CanyonCanyon
Washington Camp-Duquesne DistrictMining District
Patagonia DistrictMining District
Patagonia MtsMountain Range
Santa Cruz Co.County
ArizonaState
USACountry

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Key
Lock Map
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
31° 21' 40'' North , 110° 43' 3'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Locality type:
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Kino Springs136 (2011)8.8km
Francisco Miguel Cárdenas Valdez (Mascareñas)541 (2014)12.0km
Beyerville177 (2011)15.6km
Santa Cruz1,038 (2018)18.3km
Patagonia890 (2017)20.2km


A former small surface and underground Cu-Ag-Mo-Au-Pb-Zn mine located on 5 patented claims in the NE¼NW¼ sec. 9, T24S, R16E, on the NE slopes of Mount Washington, on a southern tributary of San Antonio Canyon, 2½ miles SW of Duquesne (Washington Camp), on the east slopes of the Patagonia Mountains, on National Forest land. Discovered 1908 by Dennis Coughlin. Produced 1912-1955. Previous owners/operators include the Miami Copper Co.; Beyerle (1927); the Santo Nino Mining Co. (1926-1931); Young & Gardner (1943); Santo Nino Lessees (1954-1955); the Havalena Mining Co. (1910-1912); A. De La Ossa (1958); and, W.S. Talcott (1959). Owned by the Southern Copper Mining Co., New York (1959). Operated by Utah Construction and Mining Co., Utah International (1970).

The country rock of the area is a fresh gray quartz monzonite with very conspicuous joints. The principal joints strike north to N.10W. and dip 60º to 70ºW., and the secondary joints dip 0º to 10ºN.

Prominent fractures, both mineralized and unmineralized, are found in the mine and on the surface above the mine. The fractures strike N.45º to 50ºE. and dip 60ºN. to vertical. Where mineralized, the fractures may contain pink, feldspathized quartz monzonite, light cream-colored aplite, or pyrite- and chalcopyrite-bearing vein quartz. Where unmineralized, the fractures contain as much as 5 feet of white or limonite-stained gouge and breccia.

The principal ore-bearing formation is a pink feldspar-rich medium-grained granitic rock. The contact between the pink feldspar rock and the gray quartz monzonite country rock is gradational and very irregular and suggests that the feldspar has replaced the quartz monzonite. The principal body of the feldspathized rock is a roughly sheet-like body that averages only a few feet in width, strikes N.10ºW., and dips 70ºW. The maximum thickness observed was about 20 feet, but pocketlike extensions or apophyses extend out from the main mass for more than twice that distance.

Pyrite and chalcopyrite are disseminated through most of the feldspathized rock and for several feet into the adjacent quartz monzonite. Large and small vugs and pockets of massive and terminated quartz are scattered irregularly throughout the feldspathized rock.

Molybdenite is found principally in pockets and lenses that are as much as 10 feet in maximum dimension and are located at irregular intervals in the feldspathized rock. Observed molybdenite pockets were associated with conspicuous joints. The high-grade molybdenite is disseminated for 2 to 3 inches out into the rock surrounding the joints.

Workings included development on 7 levels. The stoped area was about 200 feet long, more than 200 feet high, 30 to 40 feet wide on the stope level, and 5 to 6 feet wide in the upper levels. Worked sporadically from the early 1900's-1955.

Regions containing this locality

North America PlateTectonic Plate
Sonoran Desert, North AmericaDesert

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Commodity List

This is a list of exploitable or exploited mineral commodities recorded at this locality.


Mineral List


9 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Reference: Rolf Luetcke
Chalcopyrite
Formula: CuFeS2
Description: Occurs with large masses of molybdenite.
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 167; Blanchard, R. & P.F. Boswell (1930), Limonite types derived from bornite and tetrahedrite, Econ.Geol.: 25: 557-580; Galbraith, F.W. (1947), Minerals of AZ, AZ Bur. Mines Bull. 153: 19; Kirkemo, H., et al (1965), Investigations of Molybdenum Deposits in the Conterminous United States 1942-60, Contributions to Economic Geology, USGS Bull. 1182-E: E14-E16.
Chamosite
Formula: (Fe2+,Mg,Al,Fe3+)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH,O)8
Description: Occurs in oligoclase-rutile rock rich in molybdenite; replaces former dark silicates in the mafic igneous rock hosting the ores.
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 167.
Molybdenite
Formula: MoS2
Description: Occurs as large bodies of fine-grained, massive material & good crystals in quartz veins with pyrite.
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 167, 302; Blanchard, R. & P.F. Boswell (1930), Limonite types derived from bornite and tetrahedrite, Econ.Geol.: 25: 557-580; Galbraith, F.W. (1947), Minerals of AZ, AZ Bur. Mines Bull. 153: 19, 25; Kirkemo, H., et al (1965), Investigations of Molybdenum Deposits in the Conterminous United States 1942-60, Contributions to Economic Geology, USGS Bull. 1182-E: E14-E16.
Muscovite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Reference: Rolf Luetcke
Orthoclase
Formula: K(AlSi3O8)
Reference: Rolf Luetcke
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Description: As large crystal groups near molybdenite bodies.
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 167, 302; Blanchard, R. & P.F. Boswell (1930), Limonite types derived from bornite and tetrahedrite, Econ.Geol.: 25: 557-580; Schrader & Hill (1915), Mineral deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains, AZ, USGS Bull. 582; Schrader (1917), The geologic distribution and genesis of the metals in the Santa Rita-Patagonia Mountains, AZ, Econ.Geol.: 12: 237-269; Frondel, J.W. & F.E. Wickman (1970), Molybdenite polytypes in theory and occurrence. II. Some naturally-occurring polytypes of molybdenite, Am.Min.: 55: 1857-1875; Galbraith, F.W. (1947), Minerals of AZ, AZ Bur. Mines Bull. 153: 19, 25.
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 302; Blanchard, R. & P.F. Boswell (1930), Limonite types derived from bornite and tetrahedrite, Econ.Geol.: 25: 557-580; Frondel, J.W. & F.E. Wickman (1970), Molybdenite polytypes in theory and occurrence. II. Some naturally-occurring polytypes of molybdenite, Am.Min.: 55: 1857-1875.
Rutile
Formula: TiO2
Habit: Slender crystals & reticulated masses to several inches
Description: Occurs in altering granite.
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 359.

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Chalcopyrite2.CB.10aCuFeS2
Molybdenite2.EA.30MoS2
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Rutile4.DB.05TiO2
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Calcite5.AB.05CaCO3
Group 9 - Silicates
Chamosite9.EC.55(Fe2+,Mg,Al,Fe3+)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH,O)8
Muscovite9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Orthoclase9.FA.30K(AlSi3O8)

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:1
Chalcopyrite2.9.1.1CuFeS2
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Molybdenite2.12.10.1MoS2
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
AX2
Rutile4.4.1.1TiO2
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
Group 71 - PHYLLOSILICATES Sheets of Six-Membered Rings
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 2:1 layers
Muscovite71.2.2a.1KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Sheets of 6-membered rings interlayered 1:1, 2:1, and octahedra
Chamosite71.4.1.7(Fe2+,Mg,Al,Fe3+)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH,O)8
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Group 76 - TECTOSILICATES Al-Si Framework
Al-Si Framework with Al-Si frameworks
Orthoclase76.1.1.1K(AlSi3O8)

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H Chamosite(Fe2+,Mg,Al,Fe3+)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH,O)8
H MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
CCarbon
C CalciteCaCO3
OOxygen
O QuartzSiO2
O Chamosite(Fe2+,Mg,Al,Fe3+)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH,O)8
O RutileTiO2
O CalciteCaCO3
O MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O OrthoclaseK(AlSi3O8)
MgMagnesium
Mg Chamosite(Fe2+,Mg,Al,Fe3+)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH,O)8
AlAluminium
Al Chamosite(Fe2+,Mg,Al,Fe3+)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH,O)8
Al MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al OrthoclaseK(AlSi3O8)
SiSilicon
Si QuartzSiO2
Si Chamosite(Fe2+,Mg,Al,Fe3+)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH,O)8
Si MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si OrthoclaseK(AlSi3O8)
SSulfur
S ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
S MolybdeniteMoS2
S PyriteFeS2
KPotassium
K MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K OrthoclaseK(AlSi3O8)
CaCalcium
Ca CalciteCaCO3
TiTitanium
Ti RutileTiO2
FeIron
Fe ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe Chamosite(Fe2+,Mg,Al,Fe3+)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH,O)8
CuCopper
Cu ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
MoMolybdenum
Mo MolybdeniteMoS2

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Ypresian - Campanian
47.8 - 83.6 Ma



ID: 2766847
Early Tertiary to Late Cretaceous granitic rocks

Age: Phanerozoic (47.8 - 83.6 Ma)

Description: Porphyritic to equigranular granite to diorite emplaced during the Laramide orogeny. Larger plutons are characteristically medium-grained, biotite +/- hornblende granodiorite to granite. Smaller, shallow-level intrusions are typically porphyritic. Most of the large copper deposits in Arizona are associated with porphyritic granitic rocks of this unit, and are thus named 'porphyry copper deposits'. (50-82 Ma)

Comments: Laramide metaluminous; associated with porphyry Cu deposits Original map source: Arizona Geological Survey, DI-8 Geologic Map of Arizona, Digital Spatial data for the Geologic Map of Arizona, v. 3.0, edited by S.M. Richard and S.M. Kneale, 2002, 10 p., 2 DOS HD disks. Arc/INFO export file (.e00) format, scale 1:1,000,000.

Lithology: Major:{granite,granodiorite,diorite}

Reference: Horton, J.D., C.A. San Juan, and D.B. Stoeser. The State Geologic Map Compilation (SGMC) geodatabase of the conterminous United States. doi: 10.3133/ds1052. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1052. [133]

Cretaceous
66 - 145 Ma



ID: 3187054
Mesozoic sedimentary rocks

Age: Cretaceous (66 - 145 Ma)

Lithology: Sedimentary rocks

Reference: Chorlton, L.B. Generalized geology of the world: bedrock domains and major faults in GIS format: a small-scale world geology map with an extended geological attribute database. doi: 10.4095/223767. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 5529. [154]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Schrader & Hill (1915), Mineral deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains, Arizona, USGS Bull. 582.
Schrader (1917), The geologic distribution and genesis of the metals in the Santa Rita-Patagonia Mountains, Arizona, Economic Geology: 12: 237-269.
Tenney, J.B. (1927-1929) History of Mining in Arizona, Special Collection, University of Arizona Library & Arizona Bureau of Mines Library: 299-300.
Blanchard, R. & P.F. Boswell (1930), Limonite types derived from bornite and tetrahedrite, Economic Geology: 25: 557-580.
Galbraith, F.W. (1947), Minerals of Arizona, Arizona Bureau of Mines Bull. 153: 19, 23, 25.
Kirkemo, H., et al (1965), Investigations of Molybdenum Deposits in the Conterminous United States 1942-60, Contributions to Economic Geology, USGS Bull. 1182-E: E14-E16;
Kupfer, D.H. (1965) Santo Nino mine, in Kirkemo, H., Anderson, C.A., and Creasey, S.C., Investigations of molybdenum deposits in the conterminous United States, 1942-60: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1182-E, p. E14-E16.
Frondel, J.W. & F.E. Wickman (1970), Molybdenite polytypes in theory and occurrence. II. Some naturally-occurring polytypes of molybdenite, American Mineralogist: 55: 1857-1875.
Simons, F.S. (1974) Geologic map and sections of the Nogales and Lochiel
quadrangles, Santa Cruz County, Arizona: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map I-762, 9 p., 1 sheet, scale 1:48,000.
Kuck, P.H. (1978) The behavior of molybdenum, tungsten, and titanium in the porphyry copper environment: Tucson, University of Arizona, Ph.D. dissertation, 277 p.
Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 167, 302, 341, 359.
Arizona Department of Mineral Resources file data, Santo Nino Mine.
U.S. Bureau of Mines files, Santo Nino Mine.
U.S. Bureau of Mines field notes.
U.S. Bureau of Mines Coronado National Forest Study Report.
Arizona Bureau of Mines card file Santa Cruz County.
MRDS database Dep. ID file #10026908, MRDS ID #M000982; and, Dep. ID #10283632, MAS ID #0040230350.

USGS MRDS Record:10026908
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