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Flux Mine (Goshen Mine), Flux Gulch, Alum Gulch, Harshaw District, Patagonia Mts, Santa Cruz Co., Arizona, USAi
Regional Level Types
Flux Mine (Goshen Mine)Mine
Flux GulchGulch
Alum GulchGulch
Harshaw DistrictMining District
Patagonia MtsMountain Range
Santa Cruz Co.County
ArizonaState
USACountry

This page kindly sponsored by Dana Slaughter
Key
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
31° 29' 17'' North , 110° 45' 15'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Locality type:
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Patagonia890 (2017)5.7km
Kino Springs136 (2011)14.9km
Beyerville177 (2011)16.0km
Rio Rico18,962 (2011)21.2km
Sonoita818 (2015)23.2km


A former medium-sized surface and underground Zn-Pb-Cu-Ag-Au-Mn mine located on 11 claims in the SE¼SW¼ sec. 30, T.22S., R.16E., 4 miles south of Patagonia, about 1 mile within the mountains from their north edge, in the head of Flux Gulch, a parallel southwestern tributary of Alum Gulch, about ½ mile SW of the Blue Eagle Mine, at an elevation of about 4,800 feet, on National Forest land. Reportedly discovered in the early 1850's by Mexicans. It was relocated in 1878. Produced 1884-1963. Owned at times, or in part, by R.R. Richardson & partners, of Patagonia (January, 1897- ); Mr. R.R. Richardson ( -circa 1915); the Arizona Gold & Copper Co. (1896- ); Patagonia Mining Co.; Sterling Development Co.; Flux Mining Co.; Benjamin Heney (1905-circa 1909); Allen & Kolberg; Mr. Angel Alverez; Hugo Miller & Associates; Mr. Manuel Encinas; Mining & Commercial Corp.; American Smelting & Refining Co. (ASARCO); A.R. Byrd; E.F. Bolinger; Mr. Juan Jimenez; and, Nash & McFarland.

Mineralization is intersecting quartz-lode veins containing irregular ore shoots of rich argentiferous cerussite with minor copper oxides and silicates in the upper oxidized zone and sulfides in depth. Surface oxidation exists to depths of 250 feet. Veins are along a complex fault zone involving blocks of Jurassic-Triassic volcanics, Paleozoic limestone, and Cretaceous shale. Strong brecciation and silicic, kaolinite-montmorillonite, chloritic, and propylitic wall rock alteration. Pyrite gossan at surface.

Several veins or ledges seem to center at the mine, particularly from easterly directions, the deposits occur principally in or associated with a main north-south shear zone or lode, the Flux lode, which approximately coincides with the axis of the ridge. The lode is reported to have a known linear extent of 1½ miles (2,413.9 meters). The portion of the lode south of the mine is said to be associated with limestone which accompanies it in the form of a reef, but to the north it lies mainly in rhyolite. At the Flux Mine, the lode dips 45ºW. and ranges from 30 or more feet wide at the surface to about 8 feet in the bottom of the mine.

The ore, especially the oxidized ore, is stained reddish-brown and yellowish by hematite and limonite and some lead carbonate. It is mostly siliceous, rough, porous, or cellular and honeycombed, the feldspar having been dissolved out of the replaced rhyolite which forms the gangue. Some of it is chiefly a friable mass of crystalline gray and whitish cerussite or other lead carbonates and iron, with a very little quartz, which is mostly pyramidal, as shown in the north tunnel, and with it are associated the secondary silver minerals, mainly acanthite.

A body of sulphide ore was opened on the 260 level. Here the vein narrows to 8 foot wide, maximum.

The oldest rock formation at the mine is a small area or nucleus of principally Paleozoic limestone with some associated conglomerate and shale. These sedimentary rocks are intruded by quartz monzonite (?) and granitic aplite and together with them are surrounded, overlain, and intruded by the Tertiary rhyolite or so-called porphyry. A few hundred yards (meters) distant, in or near the deep gulch on the west, occurs a great fault contact between the rhyolite of the Flux Mine and the granite porphyry of Three R Mountain, which probably also intrudes the Paleozoic beds in the vicinity of the mine. The course of this fault, which is about N.30ºW., is approximately followed by the 2½ mile canyon nearby on the west and is marked by a boldly cropping silicified reef extending for several miles across the country from a point about ¾ mile SW of the World's Fair Mine to the north base of the mountains.

The general structure common to the formations of the region is a sheeting which dips 40º NNW. and is well exposed in the north end of Flux Ridge where the road ascends the hill. Prior to the advent of the sheeting; however, the older rocks were variously disturbed, as is shown by their variation in character and attitude.

The limestone is exposed mainly on the SE slope of the hill at the mine, seemingly dipping off southeastward into the gulch, and it is present on all levels in the mine, being especially prominent in the lower levels. In places it is highly crystalline, crushed, brecciated, and altered.

The quartz monzonite occurs at the portal and in the forepart of the west tunnel. It is a dark altered, highly sericitized and crushed granitoid rock. It is medium-grained and is composed mainly of quartz and orthoclase, including some microcline, with hornblende and a little acidic plagioclase. It is inferred that it is intrusive into the sedimentary rocks based on its contact with the crystalline limestone in the lower tunnel.

Later the rock mass at the mine was seemingly intruded transversely by an east-west dike of aplite locally called quartzite and greatly resembling that rock. The aplite occurs in the large open cut on the west, where the ore deposits lie in association with it, as does also much milky-white quartz. It is purple or reddish-gray, fine- to medium-grained, with chiefly greasy-lustered quartz, and is more or less silicified.

The rhyolite is considerably brecciated and somewhat tuffaceous, and by replacement, seems to form the main repository for the ore.

Tectonic elements include the Alum Gulch Fault Block and complex fault systems associated with the Harshaw Creek Fault.

Workings include more than 5,000 feet (1,524 meters) of work including an open cut, tunnels, drifts, shafts, crosscuts, and stopes on 4 levels (70, 100, 125, and 260), to a depth of 131.06 meters. All levels are entered by adit tunnels. The main shaft is 260 feet deep. An 800 foot west tunnel, and 200 feet of crosscuts on the second and fourth levels. Work commenced as early as the 1850's by Mexicans, and mining continued until 1963. Mining efforts concentrated on a large deposit in the south shoulder of Flux Ridge where several veins or lodes intersect. Ore is porous and honeycombed. Total estimated and recorded production would be some 850,000 tons of ore averaging about 8% Zn, 5% Pb, 2.5% Cu, 5 oz. Ag/T and minor gold, and 2.5% Mn.

UPDATE: December, 2011: This property is under ACTIVE claim by private parties, with considerations made for collecting pending obtaining physical access to underground workings. This property was reclaimed by ASARCO upon forfeiture of its claim, eliminating underground access. In Fall of 2011 U.S. Forest Service contracted to install gates and foam/puff any remaining adits, shafts and concrete storage rooms.

Regions containing this locality

North America PlateTectonic Plate
Sonoran Desert, North AmericaDesert

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


28 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Acanthite
Formula: Ag2S
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 101; Schrader, F.C. & J.M. Hill (1915), Mineral deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains, AZ, USGS Bull. 582: 262; Schrader, F.C. (1917), The geologic distribution and genesis of the metals in the Santa Rite-Patagonia Mountains, AZ, Econ.Geol.: 12: 237-269; Galbraith, F.W. (1947), Minerals of AZ, AZ Bur. Mines Bull. 153: 15.
'Alum Group'
Formula: XAl(SO4)2 · 12H2O
Reference: Rolf Luetcke
Alum-(Na)
Formula: NaAl(SO4)2 · 12H2O
Reference: RRUFF database- specimen I.D R110204
Anglesite
Formula: PbSO4
Habit: Crystals up to 1 cm long
Colour: Yellow
Description: Occurs as clear crystals in goethite vugs.
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 112.
Aurichalcite
Formula: (Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
Habit: Thick acicular crystals aggregated into clots
Colour: Light blue
Description: Occurs on limonite.
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 123, 248.
Cerussite
Formula: PbCO3
Habit: Jackstrawed sheaves of needle-like & pencil-like crystal aggregates
Colour: White
Fluorescence: Whitish (SW).
Description: From the roof in the inner part of the south tunnel and adjacent parts of the crosscuts hang great masses of closely spaced, acicular or filiform (jackstrawed), silky, white cerussite about a foot in length, for which this mine is famous.
Reference: Keith, Stanton B. (1975), Arizona Bureau of Mines Bull. 191, Index of Mining Properties in Santa Cruz County Arizona: 58 (Table 4); Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 159; Schrader, F.C. & J.M. Hill (1915), Mineral deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains, AZ, USGS Bull. 582: 258-263; Kartchner (1944); Arizona Bureau of Mines file data; Kunz, G.F. (1885), On remarkable copper minerals from AZ, Annals N.Y. Acad. Sci.: 3: 275-278; Shannon, D.M. (1981), What's new in minerals, Min.Rec.: 12: 117-118; Univ. AZ Bull. 41 (1916-17), Mineralogy of Useful Minerals in AZ: 26; Schrader, F.C. & J.M. Hill (1915), Mineral deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains, Arizona, USGS Bull. 582: 262; Galbraith, F.W. & D.J. Brennan (1959), Minerals of AZ: 28, 50; Dana 6:1094.
Chalcopyrite
Formula: CuFeS2
Reference: Keith, Stanton B. (1975), Arizona Bureau of Mines Bull. 191, Index of Mining Properties in Santa Cruz County Arizona: 58 (Table 4); Schrader, F.C. & J.M. Hill (1915), Mineral deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains, Arizona, USGS Bull. 582: 262; Kartchner (1944); Arizona Bureau of Mines file data;
'Chlorite Group'
Description: In altered wall rocks.
Reference: Keith, Stanton B. (1975), Arizona Bureau of Mines Bull. 191, Index of Mining Properties in Santa Cruz County Arizona: 58 (Table 4); Schrader (1915): 258-263; Kartchner (1944); Arizona Bureau of Mines file data;
Chrysocolla
Formula: Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Reference: MRDS database Dep. ID file #1048344, MRDS ID #M899931.
Epidote
Formula: {Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Reference: MRDS database Dep. ID file #1048344, MRDS ID #M899931.
Galena
Formula: PbS
Habit: Excellent cubo-octahedral crystals
Reference: Keith, Stanton B. (1975), Arizona Bureau of Mines Bull. 191, Index of Mining Properties in Santa Cruz County Arizona: 58 (Table 4); Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 229; ; Kartchner (1944); Schrader, F.C. & J.M. Hill (1915), Mineral deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains, AZ, USGS Bull. 582: 258-263; Galbraith, F.W. (1947), Minerals of AZ, AZ Bur. Mines Bull. 153: 18; Schrader, F.C. & J.M. Hill (1915), Mineral deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains, Arizona, USGS Bull. 582: 262; Arizona Bureau of Mines file data;
Goethite
Formula: α-Fe3+O(OH)
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 112.
Halotrichite
Formula: FeAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
Reference: Museum Victoria specimen # M 36234
Hematite
Formula: Fe2O3
Reference: MRDS database Dep. ID file #1048344, MRDS ID #M899931.
Hemimorphite
Formula: Zn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 123, 248.
'Hornblende'
Reference: MRDS database Dep. ID file #1048344, MRDS ID #M899931.
Jarosite
Formula: KFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 262.
Kaolinite
Formula: Al2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Description: In altered wall rocks.
Reference: Keith, Stanton B. (1975), Arizona Bureau of Mines Bull. 191, Index of Mining Properties in Santa Cruz County Arizona: 58 (Table 4); Schrader (1915): 258-263; Kartchner (1944); Arizona Bureau of Mines file data;
'Limonite'
Formula: (Fe,O,OH,H2O)
Reference: Schrader, F.C. & J.M. Hill (1915), Mineral deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains, Arizona, USGS Bull. 582: 262; Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 123, 248.
Linarite
Formula: PbCu(SO4)(OH)2
Reference: Rolf Luetcke
Massicot
Formula: PbO
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 291; Galbraith, F.W. & D.J. Brennan (1959), Minerals of AZ: 28; Schrader, F.C. & J.M. Hill (1915), Mineral deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains, AZ, USGS Bull. 582: 258-263.
Minium
Formula: Pb3O4
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 300; Schrader, F.C. & J.M. Hill (1915), Mineral deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains, AZ, USGS Bull. 582: 258-263.
Muscovite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Reference: Schrader, F.C. & J.M. Hill (1915), Mineral deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains, Arizona, USGS Bull. 582: 261.
Muscovite var: Sericite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Reference: Schrader, F.C. & J.M. Hill (1915), Mineral deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains, Arizona, USGS Bull. 582: 261.
'Psilomelane'
Formula: Mn, O
Reference: Rolf Luetcke
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Reference: Keith, Stanton B. (1975), Arizona Bureau of Mines Bull. 191, Index of Mining Properties in Santa Cruz County Arizona: 58 (Table 4); Schrader, F.C. & J.M. Hill (1915), Mineral deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains, Arizona, USGS Bull. 582: 262; Kartchner (1944); Arizona Bureau of Mines file data;
Pyrolusite
Formula: Mn4+O2
Reference: Rolf Luetcke
Pyromorphite
Formula: Pb5(PO4)3Cl
Reference: Bruce Murphy Collection
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Reference: Rolf Luetcke
Saponite
Formula: Ca0.25(Mg,Fe)3((Si,Al)4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
Description: Occurs in the open pit operation.
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 361.
Serpierite
Formula: Ca(Cu,Zn)4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
Reference: Rolf Luetcke
Siderite
Formula: FeCO3
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 371; Schrader, F.C. (1917), The geologic distribution and genesis of the metals in the Santa Rita-Patagonia Mountains, AZ, Econ.Geol.: 12: 237-269.
Sphalerite
Formula: ZnS
Description: Considerable in the sulphide orebody.
Reference: Keith, Stanton B. (1975), Arizona Bureau of Mines Bull. 191, Index of Mining Properties in Santa Cruz County Arizona: 58 (Table 4); Schrader, F.C. & J.M. Hill (1915), Mineral deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains, Arizona, USGS Bull. 582: 262; Kartchner (1944); Arizona Bureau of Mines file data;
Vanadinite
Formula: Pb5(VO4)3Cl
Reference: Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd.ed.: 411.

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Acanthite2.BA.35Ag2S
Chalcopyrite2.CB.10aCuFeS2
Galena2.CD.10PbS
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Sphalerite2.CB.05aZnS
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Goethite4.00.α-Fe3+O(OH)
Hematite4.CB.05Fe2O3
Massicot4.AC.25PbO
Minium4.BD.05Pb3O4
Pyrolusite4.DB.05Mn4+O2
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Aurichalcite5.BA.15(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
Cerussite5.AB.15PbCO3
Siderite5.AB.05FeCO3
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
Alum-(Na)7.CC.20NaAl(SO4)2 · 12H2O
Anglesite7.AD.35PbSO4
Halotrichite7.CB.85FeAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
Jarosite7.BC.10KFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
Linarite7.BC.65PbCu(SO4)(OH)2
Serpierite7.DD.30Ca(Cu,Zn)4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
Group 8 - Phosphates, Arsenates and Vanadates
Pyromorphite8.BN.05Pb5(PO4)3Cl
Vanadinite8.BN.05Pb5(VO4)3Cl
Group 9 - Silicates
Chrysocolla9.ED.20Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Epidote9.BG.05a{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Hemimorphite9.BD.10Zn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
Kaolinite9.ED.05Al2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Muscovite9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
var: Sericite9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Saponite9.EC.45Ca0.25(Mg,Fe)3((Si,Al)4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Alum Group'-XAl(SO4)2 · 12H2O
'Chlorite Group'-
'Hornblende'-
'Limonite'-(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
'Psilomelane'-Mn, O

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 2:1
Acanthite2.4.1.1Ag2S
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Galena2.8.1.1PbS
Sphalerite2.8.2.1ZnS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:1
Chalcopyrite2.9.1.1CuFeS2
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
AX
Massicot4.2.7.1PbO
A2X3
Hematite4.3.1.2Fe2O3
AX2
Pyrolusite4.4.1.4Mn4+O2
Group 6 - HYDROXIDES AND OXIDES CONTAINING HYDROXYL
XO(OH)
Goethite6.1.1.2α-Fe3+O(OH)
Group 7 - MULTIPLE OXIDES
AB2X4
Minium7.2.8.1Pb3O4
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Cerussite14.1.3.4PbCO3
Siderite14.1.1.3FeCO3
Group 16a - ANHYDROUS CARBONATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
Aurichalcite16a.4.2.1(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
Group 28 - ANHYDROUS ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4
Anglesite28.3.1.3PbSO4
Group 29 - HYDRATED ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AB(XO4)2·xH2O
Alum-(Na)29.5.5.2NaAl(SO4)2 · 12H2O
AB2(XO4)4·H2O
Halotrichite29.7.3.2FeAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
Group 30 - ANHYDROUS SULFATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
(AB)2(XO4)Zq
Jarosite30.2.5.1KFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
Linarite30.2.3.1PbCu(SO4)(OH)2
Group 31 - HYDRATED SULFATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
(AB)5(XO4)2Zq·xH2O
Serpierite31.6.2.1Ca(Cu,Zn)4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
Group 41 - ANHYDROUS PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
A5(XO4)3Zq
Pyromorphite41.8.4.1Pb5(PO4)3Cl
Vanadinite41.8.4.3Pb5(VO4)3Cl
Group 56 - SOROSILICATES Si2O7 Groups, With Additional O, OH, F and H2O
Si2O7 Groups and O, OH, F, and H2O with cations in [4] coordination
Hemimorphite56.1.2.1Zn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
Group 58 - SOROSILICATES Insular, Mixed, Single, and Larger Tetrahedral Groups
Insular, Mixed, Single, and Larger Tetrahedral Groups with cations in [6] and higher coordination; single and double groups (n = 1, 2)
Epidote58.2.1a.7{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Group 71 - PHYLLOSILICATES Sheets of Six-Membered Rings
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 2:1 layers
Muscovite71.2.2a.1KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 2:1 clays
Saponite71.3.1b.2Ca0.25(Mg,Fe)3((Si,Al)4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
Group 74 - PHYLLOSILICATES Modulated Layers
Modulated Layers with joined strips
Chrysocolla74.3.2.1Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
'Alum Group'-XAl(SO4)2 · 12H2O
'Chlorite Group'-
'Hornblende'-
Kaolinite-Al2(Si2O5)(OH)4
'Limonite'-(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
Muscovite
var: Sericite
-KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
'Psilomelane'-Mn, O

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
H Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
H Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
H Limonite(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
H HemimorphiteZn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
H JarositeKFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
H SaponiteCa0.25(Mg,Fe)3((Si,Al)4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
H Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
H Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
H Alum-(Na)NaAl(SO4)2 · 12H2O
H HalotrichiteFeAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
H MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H SerpieriteCa(Cu,Zn)4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
H Alum GroupXAl(SO4)2 · 12H2O
H LinaritePbCu(SO4)(OH)2
CCarbon
C CerussitePbCO3
C Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
C SideriteFeCO3
OOxygen
O CerussitePbCO3
O KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
O AnglesitePbSO4
O Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
O Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
O Limonite(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
O HemimorphiteZn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
O JarositeKFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
O SaponiteCa0.25(Mg,Fe)3((Si,Al)4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
O MiniumPb3O4
O MassicotPbO
O SideriteFeCO3
O VanadinitePb5(VO4)3Cl
O Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
O Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
O HematiteFe2O3
O PyromorphitePb5(PO4)3Cl
O Alum-(Na)NaAl(SO4)2 · 12H2O
O HalotrichiteFeAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
O MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O PyrolusiteMn4+O2
O SerpieriteCa(Cu,Zn)4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
O Alum GroupXAl(SO4)2 · 12H2O
O LinaritePbCu(SO4)(OH)2
O QuartzSiO2
O PsilomelaneMn, O
NaSodium
Na SaponiteCa0.25(Mg,Fe)3((Si,Al)4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
Na Alum-(Na)NaAl(SO4)2 · 12H2O
MgMagnesium
Mg SaponiteCa0.25(Mg,Fe)3((Si,Al)4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
AlAluminium
Al KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Al SaponiteCa0.25(Mg,Fe)3((Si,Al)4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
Al Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Al Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Al Alum-(Na)NaAl(SO4)2 · 12H2O
Al HalotrichiteFeAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
Al MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al Alum GroupXAl(SO4)2 · 12H2O
SiSilicon
Si KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Si HemimorphiteZn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
Si SaponiteCa0.25(Mg,Fe)3((Si,Al)4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
Si Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Si Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Si MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si QuartzSiO2
PPhosphorus
P PyromorphitePb5(PO4)3Cl
SSulfur
S GalenaPbS
S SphaleriteZnS
S PyriteFeS2
S ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
S AcanthiteAg2S
S AnglesitePbSO4
S JarositeKFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
S Alum-(Na)NaAl(SO4)2 · 12H2O
S HalotrichiteFeAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
S SerpieriteCa(Cu,Zn)4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
S Alum GroupXAl(SO4)2 · 12H2O
S LinaritePbCu(SO4)(OH)2
ClChlorine
Cl VanadinitePb5(VO4)3Cl
Cl PyromorphitePb5(PO4)3Cl
KPotassium
K JarositeKFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
K Muscovite (var: Sericite)KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
CaCalcium
Ca SaponiteCa0.25(Mg,Fe)3((Si,Al)4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
Ca Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Ca SerpieriteCa(Cu,Zn)4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
VVanadium
V VanadinitePb5(VO4)3Cl
MnManganese
Mn PyrolusiteMn4+O2
Mn PsilomelaneMn, O
FeIron
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Fe Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
Fe Limonite(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
Fe JarositeKFe3+ 3(SO4)2(OH)6
Fe SaponiteCa0.25(Mg,Fe)3((Si,Al)4O10)(OH)2 · nH2O
Fe SideriteFeCO3
Fe Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Fe HematiteFe2O3
Fe HalotrichiteFeAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
CuCopper
Cu ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Cu Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
Cu ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Cu SerpieriteCa(Cu,Zn)4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
Cu LinaritePbCu(SO4)(OH)2
ZnZinc
Zn SphaleriteZnS
Zn Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
Zn HemimorphiteZn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
Zn SerpieriteCa(Cu,Zn)4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
AgSilver
Ag AcanthiteAg2S
PbLead
Pb CerussitePbCO3
Pb GalenaPbS
Pb AnglesitePbSO4
Pb MiniumPb3O4
Pb MassicotPbO
Pb VanadinitePb5(VO4)3Cl
Pb PyromorphitePb5(PO4)3Cl
Pb LinaritePbCu(SO4)(OH)2

References

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Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Kunz, G.F. (1885), On remarkable copper minerals from Arizona, Annals of the New York Academy of Science: 3: 275-278.
Dana, E.S. (1892) System of Mineralogy, 6th. Edition, New York: 1094.
Schrader, F.C. & J.M. Hill (1915), Mineral deposits of the Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains, Arizona, USGS Bull. 582: 258-263.
University of Arizona Bull. 41 (1916-17), Mineralogy of Useful Minerals in Arizona: 26.
Schrader, F.C. (1917), The geologic distribution and genesis of the metals in the Santa Rite-Patagonia Mountains, Arizona, Economic Geology: 12: 237-269.
Tenney, J.B. (1927-1929) History of Mining in Arizona, Special Collection, University of Arizona Library & Arizona Bureau of Mines Library: 309-310.
Kartchner, W.E. (1944) The geology and ore deposits of a portion of the Harshaw district, Patagonia Mountains, Arizona: Tucson, University of Arizona, Ph.D. dissertation, 100 p.: 82-84.
Galbraith, F.W. (1947), Minerals of Arizona, Arizona Bureau of Mines Bull. 153: 15, 18.
Galbraith, F.W. & D.J. Brennan (1959), Minerals of Arizona: 28, 50.
Moores, R.C., III (1972) The geology and ore deposits of a portion of the Harshaw district, Santa Cruz County, Arizona: Tucson, University of Arizona, M.S. thesis, 98 p.
Simons, F.S. (1972) Mesozoic stratigraphy of the Patagonia Mountains and adjoining areas, Santa Cruz County, Arizona, in Mesozoic stratigraphy in southeastern Arizona: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 658-E.
Simons, F.S. (1974) Geologic map and sections of the Nogales and Lochiel quadrangles, Santa Cruz County, Arizona: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map I-762, 9 p., 1 sheet, scale 1:48,000.
Keith, Stanton B. (1975), Arizona Bureau of Mines Bull. 191, Index of Mining Properties in Santa Cruz County Arizona: 58 (Table 4).
Shannon, D.M. (1981), What's new in minerals, Mineralogical Record: 12: 117-118.
Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd. ed.: 101, 112, 123, 159, 229, 248, 262, 291, 300, 361, 371, 411.
U.S. Bureau of Mines - Arizona Bureau of Geology and Mineral Technology file data.
U.S. Bureau of Mines Coronado National Forest Study Report.
Arizona Bureau of Mines file data.
MRDS database Dep. ID file #10048344, MRDS ID #M899931; and, Dep. ID #10234314, MAS ID #0040230054.

USGS MRDS Record:10048344
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