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State Route 9 - Ellis Street and State Route 72 interchanges (State Route 72 roadcut), New Britain, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAi
Regional Level Types
State Route 9 - Ellis Street and State Route 72 interchanges (State Route 72 roadcut)- not defined -
New Britain- not defined -
Hartford Co.County
ConnecticutState
USACountry

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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 41° 39' 20'' North , 72° 46' 13'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 41.65558,-72.77026
GeoHash:G#: drkkbp4m6
Köppen climate type:Dfa : Hot-summer humid continental climate
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
New Britain72,808 (2017)1.0km
Kensington8,459 (2017)2.2km
Newington30,562 (2017)6.1km
Plainville17,328 (2017)7.6km
Farmington25,000 (2017)8.8km


The history of highway construction and designation in this area is confusing and specimens can be labelled differently depending on when they were collected. Most collecting took place in 1974-5 when the state expressway section in New Britain, referred to then as Route 72, was being constructed and cut through numerous, heavily faulted low basalt ridges. As originally designated, the Route 72 expressway extended from state Route 15 (SE of New Britain), past the planned Interstate 291 interchange (which headed north), toward and past Interstate 84 (W side of New Britain). It was completed in 1979 and many early specimens labels refer to Route 72. In 1986, the planned Interstate 291 (north of Route 72) was completed but it was redesignated as state Route 9 (most specimens labelled "Route 9, New Britain" come from this section) along with the existing section of state Route 72 south of their intersection connecting to Route 15. The Route 72 expressway section west of the interchange with former I-291 remained designated as state Route 72. But the stretch of Route 72 renamed Route 9 contains the bulk of the mineralized road cuts. Based on modern nomenclature, these are at the Route 9 and Ellis Street interchange area, and at the Route 9 and Route 72 interchange area, which cover about 1 mile of expressway. Though many old labels are not locality specific, the geology and mineralogy are essentially the same throughout most of New Britain so the exact origin is somewhat academic.

Mineralization is hosted primarily by a myriad of NE-SW trending fault veins cutting basalt and sedimentary rocks and by gas cavities in the basalt. Gray (1982) provides a description of the Columbus Street vein that is relevant to the State Route 9 locality, although not all the same minerals are reported for both localities:

Basalt bordering the vein is silicified and bleached to a light gray color. This type of alteration is typical of the N45°W [actually N45°E according to Hubert et al (1992)] faults in the New Britain area irrespective of the presence of the carbonate-quartz-barite veins.

Vein filling was accomplished initially by the deposition of quartz, calcite, and ferroan dolomite in open spaces along the active fault zone. Movement continued throughout this phase frequently brecciating previously deposited vein material. After faulting ceased barite which occurs in plumose crystal groups up to 20 cm long, filled the open space in the center of the vein and cemented the carbonate-quartz breccias. The ferroan dolomite of the carbonate zone is oxidized to a dark red-brown color at the boundary of the barite zone. Cavities between barite crystals are filled by small amounts of drusy quartz, ferroan dolomite, and aragonite.

Sphalerite, chalcopyrite, galena, and minor amounts of barite, chalcocite, covellite, and tennantite fill open spaces and replace carbonates within the quartz-carbonate zones. Sphalerite was the first sulfide deposited. Galena and chalcopyrite followed later.

Vitreous black carbonaceous spheres, 1 to 5 mm in diameter, occur throughout the vein but are most abundant along the boundary of the quartz-carbonate and barite zones. Presumably these spheres were droplets of oil suspended in the hydrothermal fluids which became accidentally trapped during the deposition of the vein minerals.


Januzzi (1976) provides an early mineral list. Miller (circa 1986), Hubert et al (1992) and Scovil (2008) provide additional descriptions. Hubert gives an age of 180 million years ago for the mineralization. The host rocks are about 206 million years old.

Regions containing this locality

North America PlatePlate

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


27 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

'Amphibole Supergroup'
Formula: AX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
'Amphibole Supergroup var: Byssolite'
Formula: AX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
Anglesite ?
Formula: PbSO4
Anhydrite
Formula: CaSO4
Aragonite
Formula: CaCO3
Aurichalcite
Formula: (Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
Azurite
Formula: Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Baryte
Formula: BaSO4
'Bitumen'
Bornite
Formula: Cu5FeS4
Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Cerussite
Formula: PbCO3
Chalcocite
Formula: Cu2S
Chalcopyrite
Formula: CuFeS2
Copper
Formula: Cu
Covellite ?
Formula: CuS
Cuprite
Formula: Cu2O
Datolite
Formula: CaB(SiO4)(OH)
Devilline ?
Formula: CaCu4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
Dolomite
Formula: CaMg(CO3)2
Galena
Formula: PbS
Goethite
Formula: α-Fe3+O(OH)
Hematite
Formula: Fe2O3
'Heulandite subgroup'
'K Feldspar'
'K Feldspar var: Adularia'
Formula: KAlSi3O8
Laumontite
Formula: CaAl2Si4O12 · 4H2O
Malachite
Formula: Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Pectolite
Formula: NaCa2Si3O8(OH)
Prehnite
Formula: Ca2Al2Si3O10(OH)2
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Quartz var: Amethyst
Formula: SiO2
Siderite
Formula: FeCO3
Sphalerite
Formula: ZnS

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 1 - Elements
Copper1.AA.05Cu
Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Bornite2.BA.15Cu5FeS4
Chalcocite2.BA.05Cu2S
Chalcopyrite2.CB.10aCuFeS2
Covellite ?2.CA.05aCuS
Galena2.CD.10PbS
Sphalerite2.CB.05aZnS
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Cuprite4.AA.10Cu2O
Goethite4.00.α-Fe3+O(OH)
Hematite4.CB.05Fe2O3
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
var: Amethyst4.DA.05SiO2
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Aragonite5.AB.15CaCO3
Aurichalcite5.BA.15(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
Azurite5.BA.05Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Calcite5.AB.05CaCO3
Cerussite5.AB.15PbCO3
Dolomite5.AB.10CaMg(CO3)2
Malachite5.BA.10Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Siderite5.AB.05FeCO3
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
Anglesite ?7.AD.35PbSO4
Anhydrite7.AD.30CaSO4
Baryte7.AD.35BaSO4
Devilline ?7.DD.30CaCu4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
Group 9 - Silicates
Datolite9.AJ.20CaB(SiO4)(OH)
Laumontite9.GB.10CaAl2Si4O12 · 4H2O
Pectolite9.DG.05NaCa2Si3O8(OH)
Prehnite9.DP.20Ca2Al2Si3O10(OH)2
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Amphibole Supergroup'-AX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
'var: Byssolite'-AX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
'Bitumen'-
'Heulandite subgroup'-
'K Feldspar'-
'var: Adularia'-KAlSi3O8

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 1 - NATIVE ELEMENTS AND ALLOYS
Metals, other than the Platinum Group
Copper1.1.1.3Cu
Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 2:1
Chalcocite2.4.7.1Cu2S
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 3:2
Bornite2.5.2.1Cu5FeS4
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Covellite ?2.8.12.1CuS
Galena2.8.1.1PbS
Sphalerite2.8.2.1ZnS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:1
Chalcopyrite2.9.1.1CuFeS2
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
A2X
Cuprite4.1.1.1Cu2O
A2X3
Hematite4.3.1.2Fe2O3
Group 6 - HYDROXIDES AND OXIDES CONTAINING HYDROXYL
XO(OH)
Goethite6.1.1.2α-Fe3+O(OH)
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
Cerussite14.1.3.4PbCO3
Siderite14.1.1.3FeCO3
AB(XO3)2
Dolomite14.2.1.1CaMg(CO3)2
Group 16a - ANHYDROUS CARBONATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
Azurite16a.2.1.1Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Malachite16a.3.1.1Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Aurichalcite16a.4.2.1(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
Group 28 - ANHYDROUS ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4
Anglesite ?28.3.1.3PbSO4
Anhydrite28.3.2.1CaSO4
Baryte28.3.1.1BaSO4
Group 31 - HYDRATED SULFATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
(AB)5(XO4)2Zq·xH2O
Devilline ?31.6.1.1CaCu4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
Group 54 - NESOSILICATES Borosilicates and Some Beryllosilicates
Borosilicates and Some Beryllosilicates with B in [4] coordination
Datolite54.2.1a.1CaB(SiO4)(OH)
Group 65 - INOSILICATES Single-Width,Unbranched Chains,(W=1)
Single-Width Unbranched Chains, W=1 with chains P=3
Pectolite65.2.1.4aNaCa2Si3O8(OH)
Group 72 - PHYLLOSILICATES Two-Dimensional Infinite Sheets with Other Than Six-Membered Rings
Two-Dimensional Infinite Sheets with Other Than Six-Membered Rings with 4-membered rings
Prehnite72.1.3.1Ca2Al2Si3O10(OH)2
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Group 77 - TECTOSILICATES Zeolites
Zeolite group - True zeolites
Laumontite77.1.1.4CaAl2Si4O12 · 4H2O
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
'Amphibole Supergroup'-AX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
'var: Byssolite'-AX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
Aragonite-CaCO3
'Bitumen'-
'Heulandite subgroup'-
'K Feldspar'-
'var: Adularia'-KAlSi3O8
Quartz
var: Amethyst
-SiO2

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
H AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
H DatoliteCaB(SiO4)(OH)
H Amphibole Supergroup (var: Byssolite)AX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
H Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
H LaumontiteCaAl2Si4O12 · 4H2O
H PrehniteCa2Al2Si3O10(OH)2
H Amphibole SupergroupAX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
H PectoliteNaCa2Si3O8(OH)
H Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
H DevillineCaCu4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
BBoron
B DatoliteCaB(SiO4)(OH)
CCarbon
C AragoniteCaCO3
C DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
C CalciteCaCO3
C SideriteFeCO3
C MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
C AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
C CerussitePbCO3
C Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
OOxygen
O QuartzSiO2
O BaryteBaSO4
O AragoniteCaCO3
O DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
O CalciteCaCO3
O K Feldspar (var: Adularia)KAlSi3O8
O AnhydriteCaSO4
O SideriteFeCO3
O Quartz (var: Amethyst)SiO2
O MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
O AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
O DatoliteCaB(SiO4)(OH)
O Amphibole Supergroup (var: Byssolite)AX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
O Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
O HematiteFe2O3
O LaumontiteCaAl2Si4O12 · 4H2O
O PrehniteCa2Al2Si3O10(OH)2
O Amphibole SupergroupAX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
O PectoliteNaCa2Si3O8(OH)
O CupriteCu2O
O CerussitePbCO3
O Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
O DevillineCaCu4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
O AnglesitePbSO4
FFluorine
F Amphibole Supergroup (var: Byssolite)AX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
F Amphibole SupergroupAX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
NaSodium
Na PectoliteNaCa2Si3O8(OH)
MgMagnesium
Mg DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
AlAluminium
Al K Feldspar (var: Adularia)KAlSi3O8
Al Amphibole Supergroup (var: Byssolite)AX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
Al LaumontiteCaAl2Si4O12 · 4H2O
Al PrehniteCa2Al2Si3O10(OH)2
Al Amphibole SupergroupAX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
SiSilicon
Si QuartzSiO2
Si K Feldspar (var: Adularia)KAlSi3O8
Si Quartz (var: Amethyst)SiO2
Si DatoliteCaB(SiO4)(OH)
Si Amphibole Supergroup (var: Byssolite)AX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
Si LaumontiteCaAl2Si4O12 · 4H2O
Si PrehniteCa2Al2Si3O10(OH)2
Si Amphibole SupergroupAX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
Si PectoliteNaCa2Si3O8(OH)
SSulfur
S BaryteBaSO4
S AnhydriteCaSO4
S ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
S GalenaPbS
S ChalcociteCu2S
S BorniteCu5FeS4
S SphaleriteZnS
S DevillineCaCu4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
S AnglesitePbSO4
S CovelliteCuS
ClChlorine
Cl Amphibole Supergroup (var: Byssolite)AX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
Cl Amphibole SupergroupAX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
KPotassium
K K Feldspar (var: Adularia)KAlSi3O8
CaCalcium
Ca AragoniteCaCO3
Ca DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
Ca CalciteCaCO3
Ca AnhydriteCaSO4
Ca DatoliteCaB(SiO4)(OH)
Ca LaumontiteCaAl2Si4O12 · 4H2O
Ca PrehniteCa2Al2Si3O10(OH)2
Ca PectoliteNaCa2Si3O8(OH)
Ca DevillineCaCu4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
TiTitanium
Ti Amphibole Supergroup (var: Byssolite)AX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
Ti Amphibole SupergroupAX2Z5((Si,Al,Ti)8O22)(OH,F,Cl,O)2
FeIron
Fe SideriteFeCO3
Fe ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Fe Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
Fe HematiteFe2O3
Fe BorniteCu5FeS4
CuCopper
Cu MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
Cu AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Cu ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Cu CopperCu
Cu ChalcociteCu2S
Cu BorniteCu5FeS4
Cu CupriteCu2O
Cu Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
Cu DevillineCaCu4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
Cu CovelliteCuS
ZnZinc
Zn SphaleriteZnS
Zn Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
BaBarium
Ba BaryteBaSO4
PbLead
Pb GalenaPbS
Pb CerussitePbCO3
Pb AnglesitePbSO4

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Early Jurassic
174.1 - 201.3 Ma



ID: 2968514
Portland Arkose

Age: Early Jurassic (174.1 - 201.3 Ma)

Stratigraphic Name: Portland Arkose

Description: Reddish-brown to maroon micaceous arkose and siltstone and red to black fissile silty shale. Grades eastward into coarse conglomerate (fanglomerate).

Comments: Part of Central Lowlands; Newark Terrane - Hartford and Pomperaug Mesozoic Basins. Part of Newark Supergroup (Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic) Original map source: Connecticut Geological and Natural History Survey, DEP, in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey, 2000, Bedrock Geology of Connecticut, shapefile, scale 1:50,000

Lithology: Major:{arkose,siltstone}, Minor:{shale,conglomerate}

Reference: Horton, J.D., C.A. San Juan, and D.B. Stoeser. The State Geologic Map Compilation (SGMC) geodatabase of the conterminous United States. doi: 10.3133/ds1052. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1052. [133]

Triassic
201.3 - 251.902 Ma



ID: 3188891
Mesozoic volcanic and intrusive rocks

Age: Triassic (201.3 - 251.902 Ma)

Comments: Connecticut Valley Basin

Lithology: Mafic volcanic rocks; conglomerate,arkose,shale,arenite

Reference: Chorlton, L.B. Generalized geology of the world: bedrock domains and major faults in GIS format: a small-scale world geology map with an extended geological attribute database. doi: 10.4095/223767. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 5529. [154]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Januzzi, Ronald E. (1976), Mineral Localities of Connecticut and Southeastern New York State. The Mineralogical Press, Danbury, Connecticut.
Gray, Norman H. (1982): Copper Occurrences In The Hartford Basin Of Northern Connecticut. In Guidebook for Fieldtrips in Connecticut and South Central Massachusetts, New England Intercollegiate Geological Conference, 74th Annual Meeting, Connecticut Department Of Environmental Protection Guidebook No. 5: 195-211.
Miller, F. W. (circa 1986), Hydrothermal Quartz and Barite Veins in the Basalt of New Britain, Connecticut. Harvard University Mineralogical Musum Association.
Hubert, John F., Paul E. Feshbach-Meriney and Michael A. Smith. (1992). The Triassic-Jurassic Hartford Rift Basin, Connecticut and Massachusetts: Evolution, Sandstone Diagenesis, and Hydrocarbon History. AAPG Bulletin: 76(11).
Scovil, Jeffrey. (2008): Minerals of the Ellis Street Extension Road Cut, Route 72, New Britain, Connecticut. Rocks & Minerals: 83(2): 152-160.

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