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McGill University campus, Mont Royal, Montréal, Québec, Canadai
Regional Level Types
McGill University campus- not defined -
Mont RoyalMountain
MontréalCity
QuébecProvince
CanadaCountry

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Key
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
45° 30' 15'' North , 73° 34' 38'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Montréal1,600,000 (2018)1.0km
Westmount20,494 (2010)2.9km
Notre-Dame-de-Grâce67,000 (2017)4.2km
Saint-Raymond9,273 (2018)4.8km
Longueuil229,330 (2016)5.5km


The McGill University campus is on the eastern lower slope of Mont Royal. It is the type locality for dawsonite. The type occurrence of dawsonite was a trachytic (feldspathic) dike cutting Trenton limestone "near the western end of McGill College [now McGill University]" adjacent to the Arts Building.

The type dawsonite specimens were collected between 1855 and 1874 by Principal John William Dawson. Dawsonite had been collected before 1843 by Dr. A. F. Holmes from the "foundation of McGill College" but was misidentified as natrolite. Dawson recognized his material as a likely new species and referred it to Professor B.J. Harrington who published the first description of the new mineral in 1875.

Dawsonite occurred in veinlets in joints, formed on cooling of a feldspathic dike, and in clusters. Associated minerals include calcite, kaolinite, cubes of pyrite and fluorite.

What was probably the same dike from which Dawson collected his specimens was encountered in September and October of 1963 during construction of the Leacock Building. Another dike containing dawsonite was encountered in 2001 and 2002 during construction of the Penfield 740 Building and the Trottier Building. This dike is about 200 meters north-northwest of the 1963 dike and has a very different strike. Notably, it produced much better specimens of dawsonite.

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Gallery Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


8 valid minerals. 1 (TL) - type locality of valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Arsenopyrite
Formula: FeAsS
Reference: Stevenson, John S., The Petrology of Dawsonite at the Type Locality, Montreal, The Canadian Mineralogist, 1964
Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Reference: Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II: 277.; Stevenson, John S., The Petrology of Dawsonite at the Type Locality, Montreal, The Canadian Mineralogist, 1964
Dawsonite (TL)
Formula: NaAlCO3(OH)2
Type Locality:
Reference: HARRINGTON, B.J. (1874 & 1978); Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II: 277.; Stevenson, John S., The Petrology of Dawsonite at the Type Locality, Montreal, The Canadian Mineralogist, 1964
Dolomite
Formula: CaMg(CO3)2
Reference: Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II: 277.
Fluorite
Formula: CaF2
Reference: Donald Doell Personal Observations
Galena
Formula: PbS
Reference: Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II: 277.; Stevenson, John S., The Petrology of Dawsonite at the Type Locality, Montreal, The Canadian Mineralogist, 1964
Kaolinite
Formula: Al2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Reference: Stevenson, John S., The Petrology of Dawsonite at the Type Locality, Montreal, The Canadian Mineralogist, 1964
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Reference: Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II: 277.; Stevenson, John S., The Petrology of Dawsonite at the Type Locality, Montreal, The Canadian Mineralogist, 1964
'Wad'
Reference: Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II: 277.

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Arsenopyrite2.EB.20FeAsS
Galena2.CD.10PbS
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Group 3 - Halides
Fluorite3.AB.25CaF2
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Calcite5.AB.05CaCO3
Dawsonite (TL)5.BB.10NaAlCO3(OH)2
Dolomite5.AB.10CaMg(CO3)2
Group 9 - Silicates
Kaolinite9.ED.05Al2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Wad'-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Galena2.8.1.1PbS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Arsenopyrite2.12.4.1FeAsS
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 9 - NORMAL HALIDES
AX2
Fluorite9.2.1.1CaF2
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
AB(XO3)2
Dolomite14.2.1.1CaMg(CO3)2
Group 16a - ANHYDROUS CARBONATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
Dawsonite (TL)16a.3.8.1NaAlCO3(OH)2
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
Kaolinite-Al2(Si2O5)(OH)4
'Wad'-

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H DawsoniteNaAlCO3(OH)2
H KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
CCarbon
C DawsoniteNaAlCO3(OH)2
C CalciteCaCO3
C DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
OOxygen
O DawsoniteNaAlCO3(OH)2
O CalciteCaCO3
O DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
O KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
FFluorine
F FluoriteCaF2
NaSodium
Na DawsoniteNaAlCO3(OH)2
MgMagnesium
Mg DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
AlAluminium
Al DawsoniteNaAlCO3(OH)2
Al KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
SiSilicon
Si KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
SSulfur
S PyriteFeS2
S GalenaPbS
S ArsenopyriteFeAsS
CaCalcium
Ca CalciteCaCO3
Ca DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
Ca FluoriteCaF2
FeIron
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe ArsenopyriteFeAsS
AsArsenic
As ArsenopyriteFeAsS
PbLead
Pb GalenaPbS

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
HARRINGTON, B.J. (1874) Notes on Dawsonite, a new carbonate. Canadian Naturalist and Quarterly Journal of Science, VII, 305-309.
HARRINGTON, B.J. (1878) Note on the composition of dawsonite. Canadian Naturalist and Quarterly Journal of Science, New series, X, 84-86.
STEVENSON, J.S. & STEVENSON,L.S. (1965) The Petrology of Dawsonite at the type locality, Montreal, Canadian Mineralogist 8, 249-252.
TARASSOFF, P. (2013) Dawsonite, a Montreal mineral. Mineralogical Record 44,57-76.
Donald Doell personal observations

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