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Weston meteorite (incl Easton; Trumbull; Fairfield), Weston, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USAi
Regional Level Types
Weston meteorite (incl Easton; Trumbull; Fairfield)Strewn Field
Weston- not defined -
Fairfield Co.County
ConnecticutState
USACountry

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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
41° 12' 50'' North , 73° 15' 43'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Locality type:
Meteorite Class:
Meteoritical Society Class:
Most of the fragments of this meteorite were found within the boundaries of the modern town of Easton, which was the eastern part of the town of Weston until 1845, when it became a separate town. Other finds are in the towns of Trumbull and Fairfield, which were already separate towns in 1807.
Köppen climate type:


First witnessed fall in the United States, December 14, 1807.
Olivine-Bronzite Chondrite (H4; S3; W0).
Approximate recovered mass 149.7 kg; Several stones, largest 90.7 kg (fragmented)


NOTE: Most of the fragments of this meteorite were found within the boundaries of the modern town of Easton, which was the eastern part of the town of Weston until 1845, when it became a separate town. Other finds are in the towns of Trumbull and Fairfield, which were already separate towns in 1807.

Witnesses saw and heard the early morning “red fire ball” along its generally north-to-south path in southern Vermont, western Massachusetts, and Connecticut. Many sonic booms were heard, though having no experience with that modern phenomenon, it was described in ways familiar at the time, as related by Brown (1989):

Nathan Wheeler saw the meteorite, a "globe of fire," as he stood outside his house in Weston early Monday morning: "its appearance was distinct and well defined, like that of the sun seen through the mist." Judge Wheeler must have been a militia man or a veteran, because he drew his precise and descriptive analogies from the drill or battlefield. The flight lasted about thirty seconds and was followed, after a short interval, by three "loud and distinct reports, like those of a four pounder, near at hand." These were succeeded by a noise similar to "a volley of musketry, protracted into what is called, in military language, a running fire," which continued for a short while after the object was lost to sight.


Benjamin Silliman and James Kingsley went to Weston on December 18 and remained for two days, interviewing witnesses, collecting specimens, and inspecting the points of impact, essentially inventing the field study of meteoritics. But right away they ran into the also newly created economic aspect of meteorites as Brown (1989) describes:

Fragments of the exploding stone had rained about the town, and one large piece struck not two rods distant from the Prince house. This intrepid family, upon discovering the treasure that had buried itself in their front yard, promptly dug it up and smashed it apart, discerning, with a sense of true Yankee economy, that if one stone could be valuable, many were more so. Others combed the countryside, searching for the telltale signs of violent impact.

Merchant Isaac Bronson...wrote on December 31 to report that an additional portion of the meteor, weighing approximately thirty-seven pounds, had been discovered near Taskaway Hill but that the discoverer had extravagant notions of its worth. Bronson offered farmer Jennings $5.00 and promised that, should he be able to obtain it at that price, Silliman might "rest assured" that it would be sent to "enrich…the curious and valuable" collection at Yale.


About 300 pounds of fragments were obtained by Silliman and Kingsley and they are the first catalogued objects in the Yale meteorite collection, which is the oldest in the US.

Silliman’s first description appeared in the Connecticut Herald on December 29. But where to publish the real scientific results became a controversial topic as there were few, well received American outlets for scientific findings at the time. An early release in France was enthusiastically received. Brown (1898) summarizes the eventual outcome, not always positive in America:

The Weston meteor drew considerable attention from across the country, even during the Embargo winter of 1807-1808. The Silliman and Day accounts appeared, in their most substantial and polished forms, in the Memoirs of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Science nearly three years after the event, but in the intervening time the essays were published "in many newspapers, and in several literary and philosophical Journals," and always in conjunction with some mention of Yale. Thomas Jefferson is supposed to have remarked upon learning of the Yalensian theory that "it is easier to believe that two Yankee professors could lie than to admit that stones could fall from heaven.” And in the first version of Washington Irving's A History of New York (1809), narrator Diedrich Knickerbocker remarks of New England that "the people at large show a keenness, a cleverness and a profundity of wisdom that savors strongly of witchcraft—and it has been remarked that whenever any stones fall from the moon, the greater part of them is sure to tumble into New England.”


By 1818, Silliman had established the American Journal of Science largely to rectify this situation.

King and Petruny (2008) have identified 4 of the 6 reported impact sites found in contemporary news reports, with an unconfirmed anecdote of a 5th site. None are currently in Weston because the original town was subdivided after 1807, they now reside in Easton, Trumbull and Fairfield.

The primary site, the Prince house, now in Easton, is about 500 m north of a road intersection at the historic 1715 Burton House. Today this is a heavily wooded, upscale housing subdivision with a vigilant neighborhood watch.

Another potential site is located a few tens of meters west of Sturbridge Lane behind several homes within Trumbull, a very stony area.

A single large fragment was found at "the foot of Tashua Hill", also now in Trumbull, the exact location uncertain, with high ground now known as Tashua Knolls including a town recreation area surrounded by woods, homes, and shopping areas.

Reportedly a small crater ~1.5 m wide and ~1 m deep with soil and bedrock ejected up to ~50 m away formed on the farm of Elijah Seeley, who lived on Hoyden Hill. It may be the same place as the Hoyden Hills within Fairfield.

Regions containing this locality

North America PlateTectonic Plate

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


15 valid minerals.

Meteorite/Rock Types Recorded

Note: this is a very new system on mindat.org and data is currently VERY limited. Please bear with us while we work towards adding this information!

Select Rock List Type

Alphabetical List Tree Diagram

Detailed Mineral List:

Albite
Formula: Na(AlSi3O8)
Reference: Meteoritics, vol. 11, June 30, 1976, p. 111-130.
Augite
Formula: (CaxMgyFez)(Mgy1Fez1)Si2O6
Reference: Meteoritics, vol. 11, June 30, 1976, p. 111-130.
Augite var: Fassaite
Formula: (Ca,Na)(Mg,Fe2+,Al,Fe3+,Ti)[(Si,Al)2O6]
Reference: Meteoritics, vol. 11, June 30, 1976, p. 111-130.
Chromite
Formula: Fe2+Cr3+2O4
Reference: Meteoritics, vol. 11, June 30, 1976, p. 111-130.
Copper
Formula: Cu
Reference: Meteoritics, vol. 11, June 30, 1976, p. 111-130.
Diopside
Formula: CaMgSi2O6
Reference: Meteoritics, vol. 11, June 30, 1976, p. 111-130.
Enstatite
Formula: MgSiO3
Description: Enstatite (sensu stricto) — [En 91.5] within xenolith, Wagner et al.,1979
Reference: Meteoritics, vol. 11, June 30, 1976, p. 111-130.; Wagner, J. K., Cohen, A. J., Hapke, B. W., & Partlow, W. D. (1979) Vacuum ultraviolet reflectance spectra of group H chondrites:In: Lunar and Planetary Science Conference X, Proceedings, Vol 2: pp. 1797-1818. New York: Pergamon Press, Inc. (March 1979).
Enstatite var: Bronzite
Formula: (Mg,Fe2+)2[SiO3]2
Reference: Meteoritics, vol. 11, June 30, 1976, p. 111-130.
'Fayalite-Forsterite Series'
Reference: Meteoritics, vol. 11, June 30, 1976, p. 111-130.; Wagner, J. K., Cohen, A. J., Hapke, B. W., & Partlow, W. D. (1979) Vacuum ultraviolet reflectance spectra of group H chondrites:In: Lunar and Planetary Science Conference X, Proceedings, Vol 2: pp. 1797-1818. New York: Pergamon Press, Inc. (March 1979).
Forsterite
Formula: Mg2SiO4
Reference: Meteoritics, vol. 11, June 30, 1976, p. 111-130.
Ilmenite
Formula: Fe2+TiO3
Reference: Meteoritics, vol. 11, June 30, 1976, p. 111-130.
Iron
Formula: Fe
Reference: Meteoritics, vol. 11, June 30, 1976, p. 111-130.; Scott, E.R.D. & Rajan, R.S. (1981) Metallic minerals, thermal histories and parent bodies of some xenolithic, ordinary chondrites. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 45: 53-67.
Iron var: Kamacite
Formula: (Fe,Ni)
Reference: Meteoritics, vol. 11, June 30, 1976, p. 111-130.; Scott, E.R.D. & Rajan, R.S. (1981) Metallic minerals, thermal histories and parent bodies of some xenolithic, ordinary chondrites. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 45: 53-67.
Magnetite
Formula: Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Reference: Meteoritics, vol. 11, June 30, 1976, p. 111-130.
Nepheline ?
Formula: Na3K(Al4Si4O16)
Reference: Meteoritics, vol. 11, June 30, 1976, p. 111-130.
'Orthopyroxene Subgroup'
Reference: Grady, M.M., Pratesi, G. & Moggi-Cecchi, V. (2015) Atlas of Meteorites. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, United Kingdom. 373 pages.
'Plessite'
Reference: Scott, E.R.D. & Rajan, R.S. (1981) Metallic minerals, thermal histories and parent bodies of some xenolithic, ordinary chondrites. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 45: 53-67.
Taenite
Formula: (Fe,Ni)
Reference: Meteoritics, vol. 11, June 30, 1976, p. 111-130.; Scott, E.R.D. & Rajan, R.S. (1981) Metallic minerals, thermal histories and parent bodies of some xenolithic, ordinary chondrites. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 45: 53-67.
Tetrataenite
Formula: FeNi
Reference: Scott, E.R.D. & Rajan, R.S. (1981) Metallic minerals, thermal histories and parent bodies of some xenolithic, ordinary chondrites. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 45: 53-67.
Tridymite ?
Formula: SiO2
Reference: Meteoritics, vol. 11, June 30, 1976, p. 111-130.
Troilite
Formula: FeS
Reference: Meteoritics, vol. 11, June 30, 1976, p. 111-130.; Scott, E.R.D. & Rajan, R.S. (1981) Metallic minerals, thermal histories and parent bodies of some xenolithic, ordinary chondrites. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 45: 53-67.

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 1 - Elements
Copper1.AA.05Cu
Iron1.AE.05Fe
var: Kamacite1.AE.05(Fe,Ni)
Taenite1.AE.10(Fe,Ni)
Tetrataenite1.AE.10FeNi
Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Troilite2.CC.10FeS
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Chromite4.BB.05Fe2+Cr3+2O4
Ilmenite4.CB.05Fe2+TiO3
Magnetite4.BB.05Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Tridymite ?4.DA.10SiO2
Group 9 - Silicates
Albite9.FA.35Na(AlSi3O8)
Augite9.DA.15(CaxMgyFez)(Mgy1Fez1)Si2O6
var: Fassaite9.DA.15(Ca,Na)(Mg,Fe2+,Al,Fe3+,Ti)[(Si,Al)2O6]
Diopside9.DA.15CaMgSi2O6
Enstatite9.DA.05MgSiO3
var: Bronzite9.DA.05(Mg,Fe2+)2[SiO3]2
Forsterite9.AC.05Mg2SiO4
Nepheline ?9.FA.05Na3K(Al4Si4O16)
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Fayalite-Forsterite Series'-
'Orthopyroxene Subgroup'-
'Plessite'-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 1 - NATIVE ELEMENTS AND ALLOYS
Metals, other than the Platinum Group
Copper1.1.1.3Cu
Iron
var: Kamacite
1.1.11.1(Fe,Ni)
Taenite1.1.11.2(Fe,Ni)
Tetrataenite1.1.11.3FeNi
Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Troilite2.8.9.1FeS
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
A2X3
Ilmenite4.3.5.1Fe2+TiO3
Group 7 - MULTIPLE OXIDES
AB2X4
Chromite7.2.3.3Fe2+Cr3+2O4
Magnetite7.2.2.3Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Group 51 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups Only
Insular SiO4 Groups Only with all cations in octahedral [6] coordination
Forsterite51.3.1.2Mg2SiO4
Group 65 - INOSILICATES Single-Width,Unbranched Chains,(W=1)
Single-Width Unbranched Chains, W=1 with chains P=2
Augite65.1.3a.3(CaxMgyFez)(Mgy1Fez1)Si2O6
Diopside65.1.3a.1CaMgSi2O6
Enstatite65.1.2.1MgSiO3
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Tridymite ?75.1.2.1SiO2
Group 76 - TECTOSILICATES Al-Si Framework
Al-Si Framework with Al-Si frameworks
Albite76.1.3.1Na(AlSi3O8)
Al-Si Framework Feldspathoids and related species
Nepheline ?76.2.1.2Na3K(Al4Si4O16)
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
Augite
var: Fassaite
-(Ca,Na)(Mg,Fe2+,Al,Fe3+,Ti)[(Si,Al)2O6]
Enstatite
var: Bronzite
-(Mg,Fe2+)2[SiO3]2
'Fayalite-Forsterite Series'-
Iron-Fe
'Orthopyroxene Subgroup'-
'Plessite'-

List of minerals for each chemical element

OOxygen
O Enstatite (var: Bronzite)(Mg,Fe2+)2[SiO3]2
O ChromiteFe2+Cr23+O4
O ForsteriteMg2SiO4
O Augite (var: Fassaite)(Ca,Na)(Mg,Fe2+,Al,Fe3+,Ti)[(Si,Al)2O6]
O Augite(CaxMgyFez)(Mgy1Fez1)Si2O6
O AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
O IlmeniteFe2+TiO3
O DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
O MagnetiteFe2+Fe23+O4
O EnstatiteMgSiO3
O TridymiteSiO2
O NephelineNa3K(Al4Si4O16)
NaSodium
Na Augite (var: Fassaite)(Ca,Na)(Mg,Fe2+,Al,Fe3+,Ti)[(Si,Al)2O6]
Na AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Na NephelineNa3K(Al4Si4O16)
MgMagnesium
Mg Enstatite (var: Bronzite)(Mg,Fe2+)2[SiO3]2
Mg ForsteriteMg2SiO4
Mg Augite (var: Fassaite)(Ca,Na)(Mg,Fe2+,Al,Fe3+,Ti)[(Si,Al)2O6]
Mg Augite(CaxMgyFez)(Mgy1Fez1)Si2O6
Mg DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Mg EnstatiteMgSiO3
AlAluminium
Al Augite (var: Fassaite)(Ca,Na)(Mg,Fe2+,Al,Fe3+,Ti)[(Si,Al)2O6]
Al AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Al NephelineNa3K(Al4Si4O16)
SiSilicon
Si Enstatite (var: Bronzite)(Mg,Fe2+)2[SiO3]2
Si ForsteriteMg2SiO4
Si Augite (var: Fassaite)(Ca,Na)(Mg,Fe2+,Al,Fe3+,Ti)[(Si,Al)2O6]
Si Augite(CaxMgyFez)(Mgy1Fez1)Si2O6
Si AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Si DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Si EnstatiteMgSiO3
Si TridymiteSiO2
Si NephelineNa3K(Al4Si4O16)
SSulfur
S TroiliteFeS
KPotassium
K NephelineNa3K(Al4Si4O16)
CaCalcium
Ca Augite (var: Fassaite)(Ca,Na)(Mg,Fe2+,Al,Fe3+,Ti)[(Si,Al)2O6]
Ca Augite(CaxMgyFez)(Mgy1Fez1)Si2O6
Ca DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
TiTitanium
Ti Augite (var: Fassaite)(Ca,Na)(Mg,Fe2+,Al,Fe3+,Ti)[(Si,Al)2O6]
Ti IlmeniteFe2+TiO3
CrChromium
Cr ChromiteFe2+Cr23+O4
FeIron
Fe Enstatite (var: Bronzite)(Mg,Fe2+)2[SiO3]2
Fe ChromiteFe2+Cr23+O4
Fe TroiliteFeS
Fe Iron (var: Kamacite)(Fe,Ni)
Fe Taenite(Fe,Ni)
Fe Augite (var: Fassaite)(Ca,Na)(Mg,Fe2+,Al,Fe3+,Ti)[(Si,Al)2O6]
Fe Augite(CaxMgyFez)(Mgy1Fez1)Si2O6
Fe IlmeniteFe2+TiO3
Fe MagnetiteFe2+Fe23+O4
Fe TetrataeniteFeNi
Fe IronFe
NiNickel
Ni Iron (var: Kamacite)(Fe,Ni)
Ni Taenite(Fe,Ni)
Ni TetrataeniteFeNi
CuCopper
Cu CopperCu

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Meteoritics (1976): 11(June 30): 111-130.
Wagner, J.K., Cohen, A.J., Hapke, B.W. & Partlow, W.D. (1979) Vacuum ultraviolet reflectance spectra of group H chondrites:In: Lunar and Planetary Science Conference X, Proceedings, Vol 2: pp. 1797-1818. New York: Pergamon Press, Inc. (March 1979).
Scott, E.R.D. & Rajan, R.S. (1981) Metallic minerals, thermal histories and parent bodies of some xenolithic, ordinary chondrites. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 45: 53-67.
Brown, Chandos Michael. (1989): Benjamin Silliman, A Life in the Young Republic. Princton University Press, New Jersey. pp. 221-229.
King, D. T., Jr. and L. W. Petruny. (2008): The Weston Meteorite (1807) - Impact Sites in Fairfield County, Connecticut. Lunar and Planetary Science, vol. 39.
Weisberg, M.K. & 8 others (2009) The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 96, September 2009: Meteoritics & Planetary Science 44 (9): 1355-1397. (Sept 2009).
Grady, M.M., Pratesi, G. & Moggi-Cecchi, V. (2015) Atlas of Meteorites. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, United Kingdom. 373 pages.

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