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Slocum prospect, East Hampton (Chatham), Middlesex Co., Connecticut, USAi
Regional Level Types
Slocum prospectProspect
East Hampton (Chatham)- not defined -
Middlesex Co.County
ConnecticutState
USACountry

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Key
Lock Map
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
41° 31' 56'' North , 72° 28' 16'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Locality type:
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Moodus1,413 (2017)3.7km
East Hampton2,691 (2017)5.5km
Lake Pocotopaug3,436 (2017)8.1km
Higganum1,698 (2017)8.1km
East Haddam9,042 (2017)8.8km


Several excavations surrounding a pegmatite that was operated as a fee collecting site by Robert Gallant in the 1960s, though it was closed in the late 1970s (Albini, 1979). The most complete description is given by Cameron et al (1954):

The property is owned by Edwin Slater, R. F. D., East Hampton. According to local reports, feldspar mining was begun about 1890 by John White. F. A. Slocum later purchased the property and mined feldspar between 1920 and 1922. The prospect was mapped by E. N. Cameron and V. E. Shainin in August 1943…. It is a partly backfilled opencut 90 feet long, 20 feet wide, and 2 to 15 feet deep.

The pegmatite is a lenticular body at least 80 feet long. It ranges from 1 to about 10 feet in thickness and has an average thickness of 8 feet. It strikes N. 70° E. and dips 18°-60° N. In the cliff east of the quarry the pegmatite ends down dip 25 feet from its exposure in the working. Its keel plunges S. 82° W. at a gentle angle. East of the quarry the pegmatite has been completely removed by erosion, but it may extend westward beneath glacial till. East of the cut the beryl-bearing pegmatite truncates an older, barren, pegmatite. The latter consists of quartz, plagioclase, [microcline] perthite, and minor muscovite. The beryl-bearing pegmatite is discordant to thin-bedded mica quartzites whose bedding and foliation strike slightly north of east and dip gently westward.

The pegmatite is distinctly zoned. The border zone is ¼ to 12 inches thick and consists of fine-grained quartz, plagioclase and [microcline] perthite, with accessory garnet, tourmaline, and beryl.

The wall zone, 1.2 to 1.6 feet thick, consists of quartz, [microcline] perthite, and plagioclase, with accessory beryl, black tourmaline, scrap muscovite, and rare biotite and columbite-tantalite. The zone becomes progressively coarser-grained toward the center of the pegmatite. Its inner part is nearly free of beryl.

The outer intermediate zone, 1 to 6 feet thick, consists of coarse-grained white to cream-colored [microcline] perthite and granular quartz. The zone is exposed only at the eastern end of the core where it is an indistinct hood-shaped body between the wall zone and the core.

The core-margin zone, 6 inches to 1 foot thick, consists of granular milky quartz, coarse-grained [microcline] perthite, and subordinate beryl. Quartz and [microcline] perthite are about equal in abundance…

The core is probably 5 to 7 feet thick but only its upper margin is visible. It consists of granular milky quartz and a few scattered [microcline] perthite crystals.

Beryl occurs in the pegmatite in yellow (“golden”), green, and blue euhedral crystals. In the border zone they range in size from 1/32 to 1/34 inch in diameter and from 1/2 inch to 2 1/2 inches long. Crystals as much as 8 inches in length and 1 inch in diameter occur in the core-margin zone.


There is also a smaller pegmatite exposed in a trench near the top of the hill that produced small but very clear garnet and heliodor.

Regarding beryl, Schooner (1958) reports that:

A few years ago, Frank Bibik reopened the Slocum Quarry and worked it sporadically for specimens and gems of golden and greenish beryl. Some superb crystals were obtained at that time. The author has seen one marvelously etched crystal, of a rich greenish-golden color and almost flawless, in the collection of Robert Gallant. It was embedded in clay in a small cavity. The operator also unearthed one of these truly gorgeous crystals.


and:

Magnificent heliodor crystals, completely flawless and beautifully formed, are on display in the Harvard University Museum [http://www.mindat.org/photo-427820.html]. They were collected at the Slocum Quarry in East Hampton by the late Louis W. Little, many years ago. The author used to see these crystals quite often, while the Little collection was still in the area. As he remembers them, some are two or three inches in length and almost an inch in diameter. They have a pure golden-color, with no tint of green.


Schooner (1961) provides an update:

The Slocum quarry, which has been intermittently active in the past few years, has produced many crystals of golden beryl, sharp in form and of the finest gem quality. Indeed, this is one of the principal heliodor sources in North America....Of late, several magnificent specimens of a different type have been recovered. Those are deeply etched, frosty-looking, greenish-golden gem crystals, from cavities along a fault (?) which runs through the lower end of the quarry. The Gallant collection includes a superb crystal, with rounded diamond-shaped etch-pits on virtually every surface. It is over two inches long.


Most beryls frozen in matrix tend to be very elongated and were segmented along basal cleavages before the matrix was fully frozen. Rarely is a complete beryl intact upon removal and the segments are usually capped by "healed" cleavages rather than true pinacoidal faces. True terminations show complete or partial pyramidal forms.

Regions containing this locality

North America PlateTectonic Plate

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


37 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Actinolite ?
Formula: ☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Description: Regarding this mineral, the references consist of a list of minerals with no supporting details. If present, probably in the surrounding host rock, the Hebron Gneiss, which is a calc-silicate rock.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147.; Schooner (1958)
Albite
Formula: Na(AlSi3O8)
Colour: pale gray to white
Description: Forms a dull gray matrix with accessory greenish-yellow muscovite, white microcline, beryl, and schorl. Much massive material looks surprisingly like white microcline until one finds the polysynthetic twinning striations indicative of albite.
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 70:403; USGS Prof Paper 255; Rocks & Minerals (1995) 70:396-409
Albite var: Cleavelandite
Formula: Na(AlSi3O8)
Habit: platy
Colour: white
Description: Forms a vuggy albitite associated with bavenite.
Reference: Harold Moritz (former Dick Schooner) collections
Almandine
Formula: Fe2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Habit: trapezohedral
Colour: ruby red
Reference: Harold Moritz collection
Annite
Formula: KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Habit: subhedral
Colour: black
Description: Listed in references as biotite. Accessory in the wall zone.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147.; USGS Prof Paper 255
Autunite
Formula: Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
Fluorescence: green
Description: Listed by several sources without details, but plausible for the locality.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147.; Schooner (1958); Jones (1960)
Bavenite
Formula: Ca4Be2Al2Si9O26(OH)2
Habit: tufts and radiating crystals
Colour: white
Description: Typically coating beryl
Reference: Collection of Kevin Czaja.
Bertrandite
Formula: Be4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Habit: complex euhedral microcrystals
Colour: colorless to white
Description: Associated with etched beryl.
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 70:422; Rocks & Minerals (1995) 70:396-409
Beryl
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Habit: elongated prisms with partial or complete pyramidal terminations
Colour: yellow, yellow-green, blue
Description: "Beryl occurs in the pegmatite in yellow (“golden”), green, and blue euhedral crystals. In the border zone they range in size from 1/32 to 1/34 inch in diameter and from 1/2 inch to 2 1/2 inches long. Crystals as much as 8 inches in length and 1 inch in diameter occur in the core-margin zone." Cameron et al (1954): USGS Prof Paper 255 "many crystals of golden beryl, sharp in form and of the finest gem quality. Indeed, this is one of the principal heliodor sources in North America. The Little collection, at Harvard University, contains some exceptionally fine clear golden crystals; they were obtained from masses of quartz, many years ago. Similar crystals are in various museums and private collections. Of late, several magnificent specimens of a different type have been recovered. Those are deeply etched, frosty-looking, greenish-golden gem crystals, from cavities along a fault (?) which runs through the lower end of the quarry. The Gallant collection includes a superb crystal, with round¬ed diamond-shaped etch-pits on virtually every surface. It is over two inches long." Schooner (1961).
Reference: Schooner (1958 and 1961); USGS Prof Paper 255; Rocks & Minerals (1995) 70:396-409
Beryl var: Aquamarine
Formula: Be3Al2Si6O18
Habit: elongated prisms with partial or complete pyramidal terminations
Colour: blue
Description: "Beryl occurs in the pegmatite in yellow (“golden”), green, and blue euhedral crystals. In the border zone they range in size from 1/32 to 1/34 inch in diameter and from 1/2 inch to 2 1/2 inches long. Crystals as much as 8 inches in length and 1 inch in diameter occur in the core-margin zone." Cameron et al (1954): USGS Prof Paper 255
Reference: USGS Prof Paper 255
Beryl var: Heliodor
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Habit: elongated prisms with partial or complete pyramidal terminations
Colour: yellow
Description: "Beryl occurs in the pegmatite in yellow (“golden”), green, and blue euhedral crystals. In the border zone they range in size from 1/32 to 1/34 inch in diameter and from 1/2 inch to 2 1/2 inches long. Crystals as much as 8 inches in length and 1 inch in diameter occur in the core-margin zone." Cameron et al (1954): USGS Prof Paper 255; "many crystals of golden beryl, sharp in form and of the finest gem quality. Indeed, this is one of the principal heliodor sources in North America. The Little collection, at Harvard University, contains some exceptionally fine clear golden crystals; they were obtained from masses of quartz, many years ago. Similar crystals are in various museums and private collections. Of late, several magnificent specimens of a different type have been recovered. Those are deeply etched, frosty-looking, greenish-golden gem crystals, from cavities along a fault (?) which runs through the lower end of the quarry. The Gallant collection includes a superb crystal, with round¬ed diamond-shaped etch-pits on virtually every surface. It is over two inches long." Schooner (1961).
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12:145.; USGS Prof Paper 255; Rocks & Minerals (1995) 70:396-409; Schooner (1958 and 1961)
Bismite
Formula: Bi2O3
Habit: encrstation/pseudomorph after bismuthinite
Colour: green
Description: Alteration product associated with a roughly 1 cm crystalline mass of bismuthinite in albite/schorl matrix with associated bismutite (yellow).
Reference: Eric Quinter collection
Bismuthinite
Formula: Bi2S3
Habit: crystalline mass
Colour: gray metallic
Description: A roughly 1 cm crystalline mass in albite/schorl matrix with associated bismite (green) and bismutite (yellow) alteration.
Reference: Eric Quinter collection
Bismutite
Formula: (BiO)2CO3
Habit: encrustation/pseudomorph after bismuthinite
Colour: yellow
Description: Alteration product associated with a roughly 1 cm crystalline mass of bismuthinite in albite/schorl matrix with associated bismite (green).
Reference: Eric Quinter collection
Columbite-(Fe)
Formula: Fe2+Nb2O6
Habit: tabular
Colour: black
Description: "fine little tabular crystals are occasionally found with beryl" Schooner (1958)
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12:145.; USGS Prof Paper 255; Schooner (1958 and 1961)
Diopside ?
Formula: CaMgSi2O6
Description: Regarding this mineral, the references consist of a list of minerals with no supporting details. If present, probably in the surrounding host rock, the Hebron Gneiss, which is a calc-silicate rock.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147. Schooner (1958)
Fluorapatite
Formula: Ca5(PO4)3F
Colour: pink
Fluorescence: yellow
Description: "Recently, some delicate pink crystals, with albite and black tourmaline, have been collected" Schooner (1961). Included in lists, including Jones (1960) and probably common in the typical pale green color.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147.; Schooner (1961), Jones (1960)
Fluorite
Formula: CaF2
Habit: massive
Colour: pale green
Description: "Pale green cleavages, unusual in that they phosphoresce after exposure to ordinary light" Schooner (1958)
Reference: Januzzi, Ronald. (1976): Mineral Localities of Connecticut and Southeastern New York State. (Taylor Assoc./Mineralogical Press); Schooner, Richard. (1958): The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.; Jones, Robert W. (1960): Luminescent Minerals of Connecticut, A Guide to Their Properties and Locations. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.; Schooner, Richard. (1961): The Mineralogy of Connecticut. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Fluorite var: Chlorophane
Formula: CaF2
Habit: cubic
Colour: colorless to rosy
Fluorescence: blue-green short-wave UV and thermoluminescence, green phosphorescence, blue-white long-wave UV
Description: Found in the pegmatite exposed in the shallow trench in 2016, as tiny, etched crystals in a small pocket or cubic-shaped voids with crumbling fluorite remnants within.
Reference: Eric Briggs, Leif DiValentino collections
Grossular ?
Formula: Ca3Al2(SiO4)3
Description: Regarding this mineral, the references consist of a list of minerals with no supporting details. If present, probably in the surrounding host rock.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147. Schooner (1958)
Ixiolite
Formula: (Ta,Nb,Sn,Fe,Mn)4O8
Habit: acicular
Colour: black
Description: Elongated, thin crystals in albite/quartz/annite matrix, with unknown translucent, orange-red coating.
Reference: Former Richard Schooner collection
Ixiolite var: Wolframoixiolite
Formula: (Nb,W,Ta,Fe,Mn,Nb)2O4
Habit: acicular
Colour: black
Description: Elongated, thin crystals in albite/quartz/annite matrix, with unknown translucent, orange-red coating.
Reference: Former Richard Schooner collection
Kaolinite
Formula: Al2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Description: Included only in mineral lists with no details but plausible for the locality, presumably clay in pockets.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147.; Schooner (1958)
Melanterite ?
Formula: Fe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
Description: Included only in lists with no details.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147.; Schooner (1958)
Microcline
Formula: K(AlSi3O8)
Habit: anhedral
Colour: white to cream
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147.; USGS Prof Paper 255; Schooner (1958)
'Microlite Group'
Formula: A2-mTa2X6-wZ-n
Habit: octahedral
Colour: red, yellow, black
Description: "Red and yellow octahedra, embedded in columbite-tantalite...a good number of crude black octahedra up to a quarter of an inch across" Schooner (1958)
Reference: Schooner (1958 and 1961)
'Microlite Group var: Uranmicrolite (of Hogarth 1977)'
Habit: dipyramidal
Colour: very dark brown to black
Description: Reportedly analyzed by Schooner. Identified by Bruce Jarnot (personal communication 2011) by: 1) euhedral microlite dipyramid crystal form, 2) strong uranium peak in its EDX spectrum, 3) strongly radioactive. Associations and properties of anhedral grains are similar to that of analyzed tanteuxenite-(Y) and could prove to be this mineral.
Reference: Harold Moritz collection. Former Bruce Jarnot collection.
'Monazite'
Description: "half inch crystals with cyrtolite and columbite" Schooner (1958)
Reference: Schooner (1958)
Muscovite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Habit: subhedral
Colour: greenish yellow
Description: Minor accessory in the wall zone, has an interesting greenish yellow color.
Reference: Cameron et al (1954) USGS Professional Paper 255
Opal
Formula: SiO2 · nH2O
Habit: coatings, botryoidal
Colour: colorless
Fluorescence: green
Description: Typically as bright green fluorescing coatings invisible in daylight. "Rarely...this hyalite is of a three-dimensional sort, with a bubbly surface" Schooner (1961)
Reference: Schooner (1958 and 1961); Jones (1960)
Opal var: Opal-AN
Formula: SiO2 · nH2O
Habit: coatings, botryoidal
Colour: colorless
Fluorescence: green
Description: Typically as bright green fluorescing coatings invisible in daylight. "Rarely...this hyalite is of a three-dimensional sort, with a bubbly surface" Schooner (1961)
Reference: Schooner (1958 and 1961); Jones (1960)
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Habit: subhedral grains
Description: Small grains in vuggy albitite associated with bavenite. Also probably in the surrounding host rock, the Hebron Gneiss, which is a calc-silicate rock.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147.; Schooner (1958)
'Pyrochlore Group' ?
Formula: A2Nb2(O,OH)6Z
Description: Included (and queried) in mineral lists with no supporting details.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147.; Schooner (1958)
Pyrrhotite ?
Formula: Fe7S8
Description: Regarding this mineral, the references consist of a list of minerals with no supporting details. If present, probably in the surrounding host rock, the Hebron Gneiss, which is a calc-silicate rock.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147. Schooner (1958)
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Habit: anhedral, rare prismatic pocket crystals
Colour: colorless to smoky
Description: The vast majority is rock-forming, though rare pocket crystals have been found.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147.; USGS Prof Paper 255
Rutile
Formula: TiO2
Reference: Jarnot (1989) in Rocks & Min.: 64:471.
Rutile var: Strüverite
Formula: (Ti,Ta,Fe)O2
Reference: Jarnot (1989) in Rocks & Min.: 64:471.
Samarskite-(Y) ?
Formula: YFe3+Nb2O8
Description: Included (and queried) in mineral lists with no supporting details.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147. Schooner (1958)
'Scapolite'
Habit: acicular
Description: "large crystals from the contact between pegmatite and gneiss" and "acicular material" Schooner (1961). The surrounding host rock, the Hebron Gneiss, is a calc-silicate rock.
Reference: Schooner (1958 and 1961)
Scheelite
Formula: Ca(WO4)
Habit: anhedral grains
Colour: white
Fluorescence: blue-white under SW
Description: Tiny specks identified by their fluorescence, found at the contact between the pegmatite and the host gneiss.
Reference: Januzzi, Ronald. (1976), Mineral Localities of Connecticut and Southeastern New York State. (Taylor Assoc./Mineralogical Press): 147.; Schooner, Richard. (1958), The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.; Jones, Robert W. (1960), Luminescent Minerals of Connecticut, A Guide to Their Properties and Locations. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.; Schooner, Richard. (1961), The Mineralogy of Connecticut. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Schorl
Formula: Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Habit: subhedral
Colour: black
Description: Very common accessory in the wall zone, some places forming a solid mass of crystals.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147.; USGS Prof Paper 255
Spessartine ?
Formula: Mn2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Description: Included in mineral lists with no supporting details. Probably almandine, which XRF analyses show is a much more common garnet in area pegmatites.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147.; Schooner (1958)
'Tantalite' ?
Formula: (Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
Description: Referred to in USGS Prof. Paper 255 as part of the columbite-tantalite series. Other references include in only in a list of minerals with no supporting details.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147.; USGS Prof Paper 255; Schooner (1958)
Tanteuxenite-(Y)
Formula: Y(Ta,Nb,Ti)2(O,OH)6
Habit: subhedral grains
Colour: dark brown
Description: Semi-quantitative data from SEM/EDS analyzed using the method of Ercit (2005).
Reference: Fred E. Davis Collection
Titanite
Formula: CaTi(SiO4)O
Description: "A few very lean examples have been noted" Schooner (1958). Probably in the surrounding host rock, the Hebron Gneiss, which is a calc-silicate rock.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147.; Schooner (1958)
Tremolite ?
Formula: ☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Description: Regarding this mineral, the references consist of a list of minerals with no supporting details. If present, probably in the surrounding host rock, the Hebron Gneiss, which is a calc-silicate rock.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147. Schooner (1958)
Uraninite
Formula: UO2
Description: Schooner (1958) reports on traces.
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 70:403; Rocks & Minerals (1995) 70:396-409; Schooner (1958)
Uranophane ?
Formula: Ca(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
Description: Included only in mineral lists with no supporting details.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147.; Schooner (1958)
Xenotime-(Y) ?
Formula: Y(PO4)
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1961): The Mineralogy of Connecticut. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Zircon
Formula: Zr(SiO4)
Habit: elongated prismatic
Colour: brown
Description: Micro crystals <10 cm, probably more common than known due to small, inconspicuous crystals.
Reference: Eric Quinter collection
Zircon var: Cyrtolite
Formula: Zr[(SiO4),(OH)4]
Description: Mentioned by Schooner (1958) as "rare"
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State, p147.; Schooner (1958)

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Bismuthinite2.DB.05Bi2S3
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Pyrrhotite ?2.CC.10Fe7S8
Group 3 - Halides
Fluorite3.AB.25CaF2
var: Chlorophane3.AB.25CaF2
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Bismite4.CB.60Bi2O3
Columbite-(Fe)4.DB.35Fe2+Nb2O6
Ixiolite4.DB.25(Ta,Nb,Sn,Fe,Mn)4O8
var: Wolframoixiolite4.DB.25(Nb,W,Ta,Fe,Mn,Nb)2O4
'Microlite Group'4.00.A2-mTa2X6-wZ-n
'var: Uranmicrolite (of Hogarth 1977)'4.00.A2-mTa2X6-wZ-n
Opal4.DA.10SiO2 · nH2O
var: Opal-AN4.DA.10SiO2 · nH2O
'Pyrochlore Group' ?4.00.A2Nb2(O,OH)6Z
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Rutile4.DB.05TiO2
var: Strüverite4.DB.05(Ti,Ta,Fe)O2
Samarskite-(Y) ?4.DB.25YFe3+Nb2O8
Tanteuxenite-(Y)4.DG.05Y(Ta,Nb,Ti)2(O,OH)6
Uraninite4.DL.05UO2
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Bismutite5.BE.25(BiO)2CO3
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
Melanterite ?7.CB.35Fe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
Scheelite7.GA.05Ca(WO4)
Group 8 - Phosphates, Arsenates and Vanadates
Autunite8.EB.05Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
Fluorapatite8.BN.05Ca5(PO4)3F
Xenotime-(Y) ?8.AD.35Y(PO4)
Group 9 - Silicates
Actinolite ?9.DE.10☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Albite9.FA.35Na(AlSi3O8)
var: Cleavelandite9.FA.35Na(AlSi3O8)
Almandine9.AD.25Fe2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Annite9.EC.20KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Bavenite9.DF.25Ca4Be2Al2Si9O26(OH)2
Bertrandite9.BD.05Be4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Beryl9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
var: Aquamarine9.CJ.05Be3Al2Si6O18
var: Heliodor9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Diopside ?9.DA.15CaMgSi2O6
Grossular ?9.AD.25Ca3Al2(SiO4)3
Kaolinite9.ED.05Al2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Microcline9.FA.30K(AlSi3O8)
Muscovite9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Schorl9.CK.05Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Spessartine ?9.AD.25Mn2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Titanite9.AG.15CaTi(SiO4)O
Tremolite ?9.DE.10☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Uranophane ?9.AK.15Ca(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
Zircon9.AD.30Zr(SiO4)
var: Cyrtolite9.AD.30Zr[(SiO4),(OH)4]
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Monazite'-
'Scapolite'-
'Tantalite' ?-(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Pyrrhotite ?2.8.10.1Fe7S8
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 2:3
Bismuthinite2.11.2.3Bi2S3
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
A2X3
Bismite4.3.10.2Bi2O3
AX2
Rutile4.4.1.1TiO2
var: Strüverite4.4.1.3(Ti,Ta,Fe)O2
Group 5 - OXIDES CONTAINING URANIUM OR THORIUM
AXO2·xH2O
Uraninite5.1.1.1UO2
Group 8 - MULTIPLE OXIDES CONTAINING NIOBIUM,TANTALUM OR TITANIUM
ABO4
Ixiolite8.1.10.1(Ta,Nb,Sn,Fe,Mn)4O8
Samarskite-(Y) ?8.1.11.1YFe3+Nb2O8
A2B2O6(O,OH,F)
'Microlite Group'8.2.2.1A2-mTa2X6-wZ-n
'Pyrochlore Group' ?8.2.1.1A2Nb2(O,OH)6Z
AB2O6
Columbite-(Fe)8.3.2.2Fe2+Nb2O6
Tanteuxenite-(Y)8.3.8.3Y(Ta,Nb,Ti)2(O,OH)6
Group 9 - NORMAL HALIDES
AX2
Fluorite9.2.1.1CaF2
Group 16a - ANHYDROUS CARBONATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
Bismutite16a.3.5.1(BiO)2CO3
Group 29 - HYDRATED ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4·xH2O
Melanterite ?29.6.10.1Fe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
Group 40 - HYDRATED NORMAL PHOSPHATES,ARSENATES AND VANADATES
AB2(XO4)2·xH2O, containing (UO2)2+
Autunite40.2a.1.1Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
Group 41 - ANHYDROUS PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
A5(XO4)3Zq
Fluorapatite41.8.1.1Ca5(PO4)3F
Group 48 - ANHYDROUS MOLYBDATES AND TUNGSTATES
AXO4
Scheelite48.1.2.1Ca(WO4)
Group 51 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups Only
Insular SiO4 Groups Only with cations in [6] and >[6] coordination
Almandine51.4.3a.2Fe2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Grossular ?51.4.3b.2Ca3Al2(SiO4)3
Spessartine ?51.4.3a.3Mn2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Insular SiO4 Groups Only with cations in >[6] coordination
Zircon51.5.2.1Zr(SiO4)
Group 52 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups and O,OH,F,H2O
Insular SiO4 Groups and O, OH, F, and H2O with cations in [6] and/or >[6] coordination
Titanite52.4.3.1CaTi(SiO4)O
Group 53 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups and Other Anions or Complex Cations
Insular SiO4 Groups and Other Anions of Complex Cations with (UO2)
Uranophane ?53.3.1.2Ca(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
Group 56 - SOROSILICATES Si2O7 Groups, With Additional O, OH, F and H2O
Si2O7 Groups and O, OH, F, and H2O with cations in [4] coordination
Bertrandite56.1.1.1Be4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Group 61 - CYCLOSILICATES Six-Membered Rings
Six-Membered Rings with [Si6O18] rings; possible (OH) and Al substitution
Beryl61.1.1.1Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Six-Membered Rings with borate groups
Schorl61.3.1.10Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Group 65 - INOSILICATES Single-Width,Unbranched Chains,(W=1)
Single-Width Unbranched Chains, W=1 with chains P=2
Diopside ?65.1.3a.1CaMgSi2O6
Group 66 - INOSILICATES Double-Width,Unbranched Chains,(W=2)
Amphiboles - Mg-Fe-Mn-Li subgroup
Tremolite ?66.1.3a.1☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Group 70 - INOSILICATES Column or Tube Structures
Column or Tube Structures with chains linked by Be
Bavenite70.5.3.1Ca4Be2Al2Si9O26(OH)2
Group 71 - PHYLLOSILICATES Sheets of Six-Membered Rings
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 2:1 layers
Annite71.2.2b.3KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Muscovite71.2.2a.1KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with H2O and organics
Opal75.2.1.1SiO2 · nH2O
Group 76 - TECTOSILICATES Al-Si Framework
Al-Si Framework with Al-Si frameworks
Albite76.1.3.1Na(AlSi3O8)
Microcline76.1.1.5K(AlSi3O8)
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
Actinolite ?-☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Albite
var: Cleavelandite
-Na(AlSi3O8)
Beryl
var: Aquamarine
-Be3Al2Si6O18
var: Heliodor-Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Fluorite
var: Chlorophane
-CaF2
Ixiolite
var: Wolframoixiolite
-(Nb,W,Ta,Fe,Mn,Nb)2O4
Kaolinite-Al2(Si2O5)(OH)4
'Microlite Group
var: Uranmicrolite (of Hogarth 1977)'
-A2-mTa2X6-wZ-n
'Monazite'-
Opal
var: Opal-AN
-SiO2 · nH2O
'Scapolite'-
'Tantalite' ?-(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
Xenotime-(Y) ?-Y(PO4)
Zircon
var: Cyrtolite
-Zr[(SiO4),(OH)4]

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H BaveniteCa4Be2Al2Si9O26(OH)2
H BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
H AutuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
H AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H Zircon (var: Cyrtolite)Zr[(SiO4),(OH)4]
H KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
H Opal (var: Opal-AN)SiO2 · nH2O
H SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
H Tanteuxenite-(Y)Y(Ta,Nb,Ti)2(O,OH)6
H OpalSiO2 · nH2O
H MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
H MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
H Pyrochlore GroupA2Nb2(O,OH)6Z
H Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
H UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
BeBeryllium
Be Beryl (var: Heliodor)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Be BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Be BaveniteCa4Be2Al2Si9O26(OH)2
Be BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Be Beryl (var: Aquamarine)Be3Al2Si6O18
BBoron
B SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
CCarbon
C Bismutite(BiO)2CO3
OOxygen
O Beryl (var: Heliodor)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
O BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
O BaveniteCa4Be2Al2Si9O26(OH)2
O Rutile (var: Strüverite)(Ti,Ta,Fe)O2
O BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
O UraniniteUO2
O Columbite-(Fe)Fe2+Nb2O6
O AutuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
O AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O Zircon (var: Cyrtolite)Zr[(SiO4),(OH)4]
O FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
O KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
O Opal (var: Opal-AN)SiO2 · nH2O
O SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
O Beryl (var: Aquamarine)Be3Al2Si6O18
O Tanteuxenite-(Y)Y(Ta,Nb,Ti)2(O,OH)6
O BismiteBi2O3
O Bismutite(BiO)2CO3
O ZirconZr(SiO4)
O RutileTiO2
O OpalSiO2 · nH2O
O AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
O MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O ScheeliteCa(WO4)
O TitaniteCaTi(SiO4)O
O Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
O Ixiolite (var: Wolframoixiolite)(Nb,W,Ta,Fe,Mn,Nb)2O4
O Ixiolite(Ta,Nb,Sn,Fe,Mn)4O8
O AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
O MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
O QuartzSiO2
O Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
O DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
O GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
O MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
O Pyrochlore GroupA2Nb2(O,OH)6Z
O Samarskite-(Y)YFe3+Nb2O8
O SpessartineMn32+Al2(SiO4)3
O Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
O Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
O UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
O Xenotime-(Y)Y(PO4)
FFluorine
F FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
F Fluorite (var: Chlorophane)CaF2
F FluoriteCaF2
NaSodium
Na SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Na Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
Na AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
MgMagnesium
Mg Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Mg DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Mg Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
AlAluminium
Al Beryl (var: Heliodor)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Al BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Al BaveniteCa4Be2Al2Si9O26(OH)2
Al AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Al SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Al Beryl (var: Aquamarine)Be3Al2Si6O18
Al AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
Al MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
Al AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Al MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
Al GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
Al SpessartineMn32+Al2(SiO4)3
SiSilicon
Si Beryl (var: Heliodor)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Si BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Si BaveniteCa4Be2Al2Si9O26(OH)2
Si BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Si AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si Zircon (var: Cyrtolite)Zr[(SiO4),(OH)4]
Si KaoliniteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Si Opal (var: Opal-AN)SiO2 · nH2O
Si SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Si Beryl (var: Aquamarine)Be3Al2Si6O18
Si ZirconZr(SiO4)
Si OpalSiO2 · nH2O
Si AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
Si MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si TitaniteCaTi(SiO4)O
Si Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
Si AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Si MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
Si QuartzSiO2
Si Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Si DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Si GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
Si SpessartineMn32+Al2(SiO4)3
Si Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Si UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
PPhosphorus
P AutuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
P FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
P Xenotime-(Y)Y(PO4)
SSulfur
S BismuthiniteBi2S3
S PyriteFeS2
S MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
S PyrrhotiteFe7S8
KPotassium
K AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
CaCalcium
Ca BaveniteCa4Be2Al2Si9O26(OH)2
Ca AutuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
Ca FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
Ca Fluorite (var: Chlorophane)CaF2
Ca FluoriteCaF2
Ca ScheeliteCa(WO4)
Ca TitaniteCaTi(SiO4)O
Ca Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Ca DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Ca GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
Ca Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Ca UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
TiTitanium
Ti Rutile (var: Strüverite)(Ti,Ta,Fe)O2
Ti Tanteuxenite-(Y)Y(Ta,Nb,Ti)2(O,OH)6
Ti RutileTiO2
Ti TitaniteCaTi(SiO4)O
MnManganese
Mn Ixiolite (var: Wolframoixiolite)(Nb,W,Ta,Fe,Mn,Nb)2O4
Mn Ixiolite(Ta,Nb,Sn,Fe,Mn)4O8
Mn SpessartineMn32+Al2(SiO4)3
Mn Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
FeIron
Fe Rutile (var: Strüverite)(Ti,Ta,Fe)O2
Fe Columbite-(Fe)Fe2+Nb2O6
Fe AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Fe SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Fe AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe Ixiolite (var: Wolframoixiolite)(Nb,W,Ta,Fe,Mn,Nb)2O4
Fe Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Fe MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
Fe PyrrhotiteFe7S8
Fe Samarskite-(Y)YFe3+Nb2O8
Fe Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
YYttrium
Y Tanteuxenite-(Y)Y(Ta,Nb,Ti)2(O,OH)6
Y Samarskite-(Y)YFe3+Nb2O8
Y Xenotime-(Y)Y(PO4)
ZrZirconium
Zr Zircon (var: Cyrtolite)Zr[(SiO4),(OH)4]
Zr ZirconZr(SiO4)
NbNiobium
Nb Columbite-(Fe)Fe2+Nb2O6
Nb Tanteuxenite-(Y)Y(Ta,Nb,Ti)2(O,OH)6
Nb Ixiolite (var: Wolframoixiolite)(Nb,W,Ta,Fe,Mn,Nb)2O4
Nb Ixiolite(Ta,Nb,Sn,Fe,Mn)4O8
Nb Pyrochlore GroupA2Nb2(O,OH)6Z
Nb Samarskite-(Y)YFe3+Nb2O8
Nb Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
TaTantalum
Ta Rutile (var: Strüverite)(Ti,Ta,Fe)O2
Ta Microlite GroupA2-mTa2X6-wZ-n
Ta Tanteuxenite-(Y)Y(Ta,Nb,Ti)2(O,OH)6
Ta Ixiolite (var: Wolframoixiolite)(Nb,W,Ta,Fe,Mn,Nb)2O4
Ta Ixiolite(Ta,Nb,Sn,Fe,Mn)4O8
Ta Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
WTungsten
W ScheeliteCa(WO4)
W Ixiolite (var: Wolframoixiolite)(Nb,W,Ta,Fe,Mn,Nb)2O4
BiBismuth
Bi BismuthiniteBi2S3
Bi BismiteBi2O3
Bi Bismutite(BiO)2CO3
UUranium
U UraniniteUO2
U AutuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
U UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Devonian - Silurian
358.9 - 443.8 Ma



ID: 3186140
Paleozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks

Age: Paleozoic (358.9 - 443.8 Ma)

Lithology: Mudstone-carbonate-sandstone-conglomerate

Reference: Chorlton, L.B. Generalized geology of the world: bedrock domains and major faults in GIS format: a small-scale world geology map with an extended geological attribute database. doi: 10.4095/223767. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 5529. [154]

Neoproterozoic
541 - 1000 Ma



ID: 2744518
Hebron Gneiss

Age: Neoproterozoic (541 - 1000 Ma)

Stratigraphic Name: Hebron Gneiss

Description: Interlayered dark-gray, medium- to coarse-grained schist, composed of andesine, quartz, biotite, and local K-feldspar, and greenish-gray, fine- to medium-grained calc-silicate rock, composed of labradorite, quartz, biotite, actinolite, hornblende, and diopside, and locally scapolite. Local lenses of graphitic two-mica schist.

Comments: Part of Eastern Uplands; Iapetus (Oceanic) Terrane - Merrimack Synclinorium; Hebron Gneiss and equivalent formations (including equivalents of Paxton and Oakdale Formations of Massachusetts) (including Bigelow Brook and Southbridge Formations) (Silurian and Ordovician). The Hebron Formation is here restricted to rocks in the area south and west of the Willimantic dome, south of the Wangumbaug Lake fault, and west of a fault in the Fitchville quad delineated by the Lebanon Gabbro. It includes the type area of the Hebron. Other rocks formerly mapped as Hebron are here assigned to the Oakdale, Dudley, and Southbridge Formations. It is separated from all other stratigraphic units by fault or intrusive contacts across which no stratigraphy can be correlated. Age is Late Proterozoic(?) based on correlation with part of the Paxton Group (Pease, 1989) per CT013. Original map source: Connecticut Geological and Natural History Survey, DEP, in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey, 2000, Bedrock Geology of Connecticut, shapefile, scale 1:50,000

Lithology: Major:{schist,calc silicate rock}

Reference: Horton, J.D., C.A. San Juan, and D.B. Stoeser. The State Geologic Map Compilation (SGMC) geodatabase of the conterminous United States. doi: 10.3133/ds1052. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1052. [133]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Montague, S. A. (1937): Some Mineral Localities Near Portland, Conn. Rocks & Minerals: 12(5): 145.
Cameron, Eugene N., David M. Larrabee, Andrew H. McNair, James T. Page, Glenn W. Stewart, and Vincent E. Shainin. (1954): Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; U. S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 255.
Schooner, Richard. (1958): The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Jones, Robert W. (1960): Luminescent Minerals of Connecticut, A Guide to Their Properties and Locations. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Schooner, Richard. (1961): The Mineralogy of Connecticut. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Ryerson, Kathleen. (1972): Rock Hound's Guide to Connecticut. Pequot Press.
Henderson, William A., Jr. (1975): The Bertrandites of Connecticut. The Mineralogical Record: 6(3): 114-123.
Januzzi, Ronald. (1976): Mineral Localities of Connecticut and Southeastern New York State. (Taylor Assoc./Mineralogical Press).
Albini, Anthony J. (1979): Selected Pegmatite Quarries of The Central Connecticut Region. Central Connecticut State University Masters thesis.
Jarnot, Bruce. (1989): Minerals New to the Portland Area Pegmatites of Central Connecticut. Abstract from the 16th Rochester Mineralogical Symposium April 7, 1989, in Rocks & Minerals: 64(12): 471.
Weber, Marcelle H. and Earle C. Sullivan. (1995): Connecticut Mineral Locality Index. Rocks & Minerals (Connecticut Issue): 70(6): 403.

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