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Anderson No. 1 Mica Mine (Swanson Mine; Swanson Lithia Mine; Old Lithia Mine; Chatham Lithia Mine), East Hampton (Chatham), Middlesex Co., Connecticut, USAi
Regional Level Types
Anderson No. 1 Mica Mine (Swanson Mine; Swanson Lithia Mine; Old Lithia Mine; Chatham Lithia Mine)Mine
East Hampton (Chatham)Quarry
Middlesex Co.County
ConnecticutState
USACountry

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Key
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
41° 30' 59'' North , 72° 31' 18'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Locality type:
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Higganum1,698 (2017)3.6km
Moodus1,413 (2017)6.2km
East Hampton2,691 (2017)6.8km
East Haddam9,042 (2017)8.7km
Lake Pocotopaug3,436 (2017)9.2km


An underground mica mine, worked first for lithia from lepidolite in the 1910s (Swanson mine), then for sheet muscovite during WWII (Anderson No. 1 mine). Some older references state it is in Haddam or the Haddam Neck section of that town, but it is just north of line in southernmost East Hampton (fka, Chatham). The mine worked a complexly-zoned and lithium-rich granite pegmatite. In 1899, Horace Williams leased the property from Olaf P. Swanson "for the period of ninety nine years from the first day of April 1900, to explore, quarry, mine and dig for minerals in, upon or under the surface of the farm" (Haddam Land Records, 1899). The lepidolite was surface mined from a trench.

Allegedly, early in World War I the Imperial German Government bought a whole shipload of lepidolite from here as a source of lithium. Before the ship could leave New York, the U.S. Government banned the export of strategic minerals, so the ship's captain radioed Berlin for instructions, and, receiving them, had his crew dump the whole cargo into New York Harbor. The source of this tale is vague. Davis (1901) states that, "The output is used in the manufacture of Lithia salts for medicinal purposes. This is shipped, as taken out, in barrels, by steamer to New York." Williams (circa 1945) makes no reference to the fate of the lepidolite. Shannon (1920) says "several tons were mined many years ago and the mineral still remains in a pile". Foye (1922) comes closest with this unattributed statement: "It was with the expectation that the lepidolite might be shipped to Germany as a source of lithium that the quarry was opened, just before the war. It is reported that shipments got no farther than the dock." Schooner (1961) says it was never shipped. The large stockpile can be seen in the WWII-era map of the locality in Cameron and others (1954). Reportedly in the 1960s, the WWII-era muscovite mine shaft (Anderson No. 1 Mica Mine) was filled in with the lepidolite stockpile. The waste from the Anderson mine was carted on a tram to a small ravine 60 meters or so to the east.

Shannon (1920) provides an early description:

The “mine” is a small cut somewhat filled in with soil and leaves; around it are piled heaps of white quartz and lepidolite. Lepidolite forms more than half of all the material removed from the pit, and large blocks of the pure mineral occur. It varies somewhat in texture and appearance. Some masses are composed of bright small scales of a beautiful deep purple-pink color, intergrown with fine platy cleavelandite stained yellow brown by iron, the contrast in colors yielding very showy specimens. Other coarser scaly masses are pale lavender to gray in color and much of the material shows small spheres up to the size of a pea composed of folia of grayish lepidolite embedded in white cleavelandite.

The only other abundant mineral in the pegmatite is quartz which is crystalline milky white, and resembles common vein quartz. Potash feldspar is entirely absent. Cleavelandite albite occurs in masses of white plates and these contain bunches and masses up to several inches across of a flesh red to brownish red material resembling massive garnet, which upon analysis proves to be triplite. The triplite will be more fully described in another paper. In places the triplite has oxidized to a black manganese oxide, which stains the cleavelandite. Occasional crystals of muscovite, which occur in the cleavelandite, are penetrated by flat opaque crystals of green tourmaline.


Hess et al (1943) gave a short description with alkali metal analytical results:

The Paul Anderson farm on the east side of the Hurd Park Road a mile south of Hurd Park and 5 miles south of the village of Cobalt is on the side of a ridge several hundred feet high. At the top of the ridge a metamorphic pegmatite 50 or 60 feet wide and 300 feet long follows the strike of the ridge and the gray mica schist, about north and at the south end stands 15 or 20 feet above the general contour.

Some quarrying was done near the north end of the pegmatite a good many years ago. At this point the pegmatite is largely quartz in which are buried mixed masses of a beautiful purple lepidolite and cleavelandite, some of which follow distinct cracks in the quartz and are 10 to 12 inches in diameter. Much of the lepidolite is in globular radial aggregates ranging from less than 1/4 inch to 3/4 inch in diameter. Possibly 4 or 5 tons of lepidolite more or less mixed with cleavelandite and quartz have been thrown in a pile. All came from an excavation about 20 feet long 6 to 10 feet wide and 4 to 6 feet deep.
A visual estimate from the spectrographic pattern of the lepidolite gave K2O, 5.0; Na2O, 1.0; Li2O, 5.0; Rb2O, 3.0; Cs2O, 1.0; and for a piece of microcline the estimate was K2O, 5-10.0; Na2O, 5.0; Li2O, not determinable; Rb2O, 2.0; Cs2O, 0.1.

Some green and blue black tourmalines are distributed through the pegmatite, and a little triplite edged round by lepidolite and blue tourmaline was found. From surface indications alone this appears to be next to Black Mountain, Maine, the largest lepidolite deposit seen in New England; but even so, remembering the erratic nature of pegmatitic deposits, no prediction as to further quantities can be made.

Considerable work has been done for mica between the lepidolite bearing portion and the east wall of the pegmatite. An excavation 30 by 50 feet and more than 20 feet deep (the bottom was covered with water when visited in April, 1942) has been dug but only one small chunk of lepidolite could be seen in the walls and none was found in the dump.

A number of large pegmatites outcrop to the north and east on the top of the ridge, but no lithium minerals were seen in them.


The most detailed description from the WWII era comes from Cameron et al (1954):

The Anderson No. 1 mica mine, formerly known as the Swanson lithia mine, lies in the town of East Hampton, 0.4 mile N. 35° W. of Haddam Neck village. It is one of the Anderson-Bailey group of mica mines...

The pegmatite was first prospected before 1920 (Shannon, 1920, p. 82-84). From June to December 1941, and from May 1943 to March 1944, the Connecticut Mica & Mining Co., Portland, Conn., operated the mine. When the mine was abandoned the workings consisted of a vertical pit 52 feet deep and 10 to 15 feet wide. Two drifts, 50 and 30 feet long, were driven northward and eastward, respectively, from the bottom of the pit. When operations ceased, the northern drift was about 10 feet longer than shown on the accompanying map (fig. 126)...

The pegmatite is a very irregular body about 30 feet thick and at least 90 feet long. It seems to strike northward and to have a moderate eastward dip. Apparently its south end is in the workings. In part the pegmatite is concordant with the foliation of the eastward-dipping wall rock (medium-grained hornblende gneiss of the Bolton schist), in part it is sharply discordant.

The pegmatite consists of the following units:

1. Border zone, quartz-[albite] plagioclase pegmatite 4 to 8 inches thick. Consists of fine-grained quartz and [albite] plagioclase with accessory black tourmaline, biotite [annite], and muscovite. The zone is cut by numerous fractures that are perpendicular to the contacts. The fractures are coated with films of pyrite.

2. Wall zone, quartz-[albite] plagioclase-muscovite pegmatite, 1 to 6 feet thick. Consists of coarse quartz, blocky [albite] plagioclase, muscovite and accessory tourmaline and garnet. The muscovite books are 2 to 18 inches broad and ¼ to 4 inches thick.

3. Intermediate zone, quartz-cleavelandite pegmatite, 5 to 25 feet thick. Consists of coarse quartz (in masses 6 feet in diameter), cleavelandite, muscovite and scattered large anhedral crystals of [microcline] perthite. Mica books 3 inches in average diameter occur in places adjacent to the quartz masses. Black and green tourmaline and green beryl (rare) are accessory minerals.

4. Quartz pegmatite, as much as 10 feet thick, consisting of coarse milky to smoky quartz. Occurs typically as a hood-shaped body adjacent to the lepidolite-cleavelandite unit and, at most places, above it. It also forms pods enclosed in the intermediate zone.

5. Lepidolite-cleavelandite unit, 5 to 10 feet thick. Fine- to medium-grained lepidolite (pink to violet to gray) with subordinate cleavelandite, quartz, and accessory dark green apatite and green tourmaline. The principal lepidolite-cleavelandite body seems to be an elongate ellipsoid at least 35 feet long whose long axis pitches S. 60° E. at an angle of about 30°. It is exposed only in the southern portion of the pegmatite but apparently a similar body was mined in the pit northwest of the vertical pit. Either this unit or the quartz unit may be the true core of the pegmatite.

The wall zone is thickest along the hanging wall in the northern drift. The content of sheet in the mica is low, and the books seem to be poorest in quality in the thickest parts of the zone. Cross fracturing, ruling, reeving, and limonite-staining are the most common defects. Shearing, probably of small displacement, has occurred along the hanging wall in the northern drift, and mica there is badly fractured.

Some blocks of virtually pure lepidolite have been obtained from the pegmatite, but most is probably too heavily intergrown with cleavelandite and quartz to be of value. It is estimated that 15 to 20 tons are in sight in the workings and that 40 tons are stockpiled on the surface.

The pegmatite seems to end southward in the workings and it may not persist for more than 100 feet north of the northern drift, so probably total reserves of mica are not large. Experience has shown that only a small percentage of sheet can be recovered from the crude mica, because of the structural defects of the books and the limonite-staining.



THIS SITE IS CLOSED TO COLLECTING!!!!!!

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Standard Detailed Gallery Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Commodity List

This is a list of exploitable or exploited mineral commodities recorded at this locality.


Mineral List


36 valid minerals. 2 erroneous literature entries.

Detailed Mineral List:

Actinolite
Formula: ◻Ca2(Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5)Si8O22OH2
Description: Component of calc-silicate assemblage in the metamorphic rocks hosting the pegmatite.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958), The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Albite
Formula: Na(AlSi3O8)
Habit: anhedral
Colour: white
Description: An essential component of the pegmatite, abundant in the outer zones.
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N., Larrabee David M., McNair, Andrew H., Page, James T., Stewart, Glenn W., and Shainin, Vincent E. (1954), Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; USGS Professional Paper 255.
Albite var. Cleavelandite
Formula: Na(AlSi3O8)
Habit: anhedral platy to tabular
Colour: white to very pale blue
Description: Abundant as large, pure aggregates with quartz in the intermediate zone and in the lepidolite-cleavelandite zone. In the intermediate zone the thin, platy crystals easily reach 15 cm or more and are tightly packed with little open space and are very rarely terminated. Generally as much smaller masses occur in the lepidolite-cleavelandite zone.
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N., Larrabee David M., McNair, Andrew H., Page, James T., Stewart, Glenn W., and Shainin, Vincent E. (1954), Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; Shannon, Earl V. (1920), The Old Lithia Mine in Chatham, Connecticut. American Mineralogist: 5: 82-84.
Almandine ?
Formula: Fe2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Habit: anhedral
Colour: maroon
Description: Massive garnet/fluorapatite pods occur in the cleavelandite unit, the species has not been recorded here, but it is almandine within similar intergrowths at other local pegmatites.
Reference: London, David. (1985), Pegmatites of the Middletown District, Connecticut. State Geological and Natural History Survey of Connecticut, Department of Environmental Protection, Guidebook No. 6: 509-533.
Annite
Formula: KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Colour: black
Description: An accessory mineral in the border zone of the pegmatite.
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N., Larrabee David M., McNair, Andrew H., Page, James T., Stewart, Glenn W., and Shainin, Vincent E. (1954), Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; USGS Professional Paper 255.
Bertrandite
Formula: Be4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Habit: tabular microcrystals
Colour: white to creamy
Description: As aggregates of microcrystals in voids in cleavalandite/quartz matrix formed by the natural dissolution of beryl, associated with clay.
Reference: P Cristofono collection
Beryl
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Habit: elongated, tapered, hexagonal prisms
Colour: colorless to pale yellow or green or blue
Description: Subhedral tapered crystals in the intermediate zone, quartz-cleavelandite pegmatite to at least 20 cm.
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N., Larrabee David M., McNair, Andrew H., Page, James T., Stewart, Glenn W., and Shainin, Vincent E. (1954), Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; Field collected by the late Arthur Groth.
Beryl var. Heliodor
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Reference: Jarnot, Bruce (1995), Connecticut Gems & Gem Minerals. Rocks & Minerals: 70:(6): 379.
Beryl var. Morganite
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Habit: subhedral to anhedral
Colour: peach, pink grading to colorless. Commonly heavily rusty stained, which hides true color.
Description: Crude crystals to anhedral gemmy to opaque masses to over 30 cm associated with cleavelandite, granular lilac lepidolite and quartz. Due to blasting, found in the dump as large, cleaved, pure chunks and as smaller masses with associated minerals.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (circa 1990), Untitled manuscript on central Connecticut mineralogy.; Jarnot, Bruce (1995), Connecticut Gems & Gem Minerals. Rocks & Minerals: 70:(6): 379.
Cassiterite
Formula: SnO2
Habit: pseudo-octahedral
Colour: dark - nearly black
Description: "lepidolite occasionally contains little black cassiterite crystals; Anthony J. Albini has some sharp crystals, perhaps 3/16 of an inch, in cleavelandite. The Eugene Smith collection has a beautiful crystallized specimen, labelled 'microlite'." (Schooner, circa 1990)
Reference: Weber, Marcelle H. and Sullivan, Earle C. (1995), Connecticut Mineral Locality Index. Rocks & Minerals: 70:(6): 403.; Schooner, Richard. (circa 1990), Untitled manuscript on central Connecticut mineralogy.
Clinozoisite
Formula: {Ca2}{Al3}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Colour: yellow to brown
Description: Schooner (circa 1990) reports that both yellowish and brown clinozoisite were identified by XRD in a calc-silicate pod from the adjacent metamorphic rocks.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (circa 1990), Untitled manuscript on central Connecticut mineralogy.
'Columbite-(Fe)-Columbite-(Mn) Series'
Habit: tabular, skeletal
Colour: black to deep red-black, with iridescence
Description: Subhedral to skeletal crystals to a few cm usually in cleavelandite and quartz or as parallel aggregates accompany triplite and manganapatite. A crystal analyzed by Harold Moritz via SEM-EDS (see photo gallery) sits right on the 50-50 point between columbite-(Fe) and columbite-(Mn). Schooner (1961) "collected several beautifully developed crystals of deep red manganocolumbite at this locality; they were up to half an inch across, and were found with cleavelandite and gray lepidolite." In Schooner (circa 1990) he reports that they "have been shown [via SEM-EDS] to be manganocolumbite with little if any tantalum. A fine specimen is at the National Museum."
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1961), The Mineralogy of Connecticut. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.; Schooner, Richard. (circa 1990), Untitled manuscript on central Connecticut mineralogy.
Cookeite
Formula: (Al,Li)3Al2(Si,Al)4O10(OH)8
Habit: massive
Colour: yellow
Description: A minor source. As a waxy coating between fractures in etched garnet masses.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1961), The Mineralogy of Connecticut. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.; Schooner, Richard. (circa 1990), Untitled manuscript on central Connecticut mineralogy.
Diopside
Formula: CaMgSi2O6
Description: Component of calc-silicate assemblage in the metamorphic rocks hosting the pegmatite.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958), The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Elbaite
Formula: Na(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Habit: massive to elongated prismatic
Colour: blue or green
Description: Elbaite occurs in 3 major ways here: 1) as blue, massive material intergrown in or around triplite pods, 2) as elongated, grassy green crystals to several cm within muscovite books in the cleavelandite-rich intermediate zone (these tend to be the most translucent), and 3) as subhedral, generally opaque, darker green crystals to several cm within lepidolite-cleavlandite-quartz matrix.
Reference: Shannon, Earl V. (1920), The Old Lithia Mine in Chatham, Connecticut. American Mineralogist: 5: 82-84.; Foye, W. G. (1922), Mineral Localities in the Vicinity of Middletown, Connecticut. American Mineralogist, 7: 4-12.; Cameron, Eugene N., Larrabee David M., McNair, Andrew H., Page, James T., Stewart, Glenn W., and Shainin, Vincent E. (1954), Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; USGS Professional Paper 255.; Schooner, Richard. (1958), The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Fluorapatite
Formula: Ca5(PO4)3F
Habit: massive to subhedral
Colour: light gray-green to dark green, pale blue
Fluorescence: yellow
Description: As subhedral crystals or masses to several cm from the intermediate cleavlandite-rich zones; as intergrowths with garnet and/or blue elbaite. Schooner (circa 1990) reports that "a few large flattened crystals have been found, often embedded in massive garnet; a strange blue variety, embedded in lepidolite, was X-rayed for confirmation."
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N., Larrabee David M., McNair, Andrew H., Page, James T., Stewart, Glenn W., and Shainin, Vincent E. (1954), Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; USGS Professional Paper 255.; London, David. (1985), Pegmatites of the Middletown District, Connecticut. State Geological and Natural History Survey of Connecticut, Department of Environmental Protection, Guidebook No. 6: 509-533.; Schooner, Richard. (circa 1990), Untitled manuscript on central Connecticut mineralogy.
Grayite
Formula: (Th,Pb,Ca)(PO4) · H2O
Reference: Fred Davis - home.att.net/~fedavis/Main/Page_109.html
Grossular
Formula: Ca3Al2(SiO4)3
Description: Component of calc-silicate assemblage in the metamorphic rocks hosting the pegmatite.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958), The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Helvine
Formula: Be3Mn2+4(SiO4)3S
Colour: yellow
Description: Schooner (circa 1990) says "Two lean specimens of helvite, yellow and with an almost sulfur-like aspect, have been collected at the Swanson mine, both by Anthony J. Albini. The helvite, identified at the Smithsoninan, is closely associated with nearly white manganapatite and a little altered triplite. It appears to be very rare."
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (circa 1990), Untitled manuscript on central Connecticut mineralogy.
Hureaulite
Formula: Mn2+5(PO3OH)2(PO4)2 · 4H2O
Habit: microcrystals
Colour: reddish brown
Description: Schooner (1958) – "A rather recent x-ray study of some altered triplite from the Swanson Mine in East Hampton, made for the author by Mary E. Mrose of the U. S. Geological Survey, showed the presence of hureaulite as tiny reddish-brown crystals."
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (circa 1990), Untitled manuscript on central Connecticut mineralogy.
Ixiolite
Formula: (Ta,Nb,Sn,Fe,Mn)4O8
Habit: tabular
Colour: black
Description: Schooner (circa 1990) - "Several beautiful ixiolite crystals, in compact grayish lepidolite, were collected at the Swanson mine, by Anthony J. Albini. These range up to half an inch; they are black, brilliant, flattened, and striated, much resembling wolframite. The identification was by X-ray methods."
Reference: Jarnot, Bruce M. (1989): Minerals New to the Portland Area Pegmatites of Central Connecticut. Abstract in: Contributed Papers in Specimen Mineralogy, 16th Rochester Mineralogical Symposium. Rocks & Minerals: 64(6): 471.; Schooner, Richard. (circa 1990), Untitled manuscript on central Connecticut mineralogy.; www.handbookofmineralogy.org/pdfs/ixiolite.pdf
'Lepidolite'
Habit: granular, as globular radial aggregates
Colour: gray to pink to purple
Description: Abundant in the lepidolite-cleavelandite zone. Shannon (1920) gives best overall description - "Some masses are composed of bright small scales of a beautiful deep purple-pink color, intergrown with fine platy cleavelandite stained yellow brown by iron, the contrast in colors yielding very showy specimens. Other coarser scaly masses are pale lavender to gray in color and much of the material shows small spheres up to the size of a pea composed of folia of grayish lepidolite embedded in white cleavelandite." Hess et al (1943) describe the lepidolite as "globular radial aggregates ranging from less than 1/4 inch to 3/4 inch in diameter". They analyzed the lepidolite for alkali metals and reported that a "visual estimate from the spectrographic pattern of the lepidolite gave K2O, 5.0; Na2O, 1.0; Li2O, 5.0; Rb2O, 3.0; Cs2O, 1.0" percent.
Reference: Shannon, Earl V. (1920), The Old Lithia Mine in Chatham, Connecticut. American Mineralogist: 5: 82-84.; Cameron, Eugene N., Larrabee David M., McNair, Andrew H., Page, James T., Stewart, Glenn W., and Shainin, Vincent E. (1954), Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; USGS Professional Paper 255.; Schooner, Richard. (1958), The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.; Hess, Frank L.; Roscoe J. Whitney; Joseph Trefethen; Morris Slavin. (1943) The Rare Alkalies in New England. U.S. Bureau of Mines Information Circular 7232: 47-8.
'Lithiophilite-Triphylite Series'
Description: Confusion with triplite and elbaite.
Reference: António Manuel Ináçio Martins
Magnetite
Formula: Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Description: Accessory mineral in metamorphic rocks hosting the pegmatite.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958), The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Meta-autunite
Formula: Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6H2O
Fluorescence: green
Description: Alteration of uraninite.
Reference: Jones, Robert W. (1960), Luminescent Minerals of Connecticut, a Guide to Their Properties and Locations. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Microcline
Formula: K(AlSi3O8)
Habit: anhedral
Description: An essential component of the pegmatite, but mostly in the intermediate zone.
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N., Larrabee David M., McNair, Andrew H., Page, James T., Stewart, Glenn W., and Shainin, Vincent E. (1954), Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; USGS Professional Paper 255.
'Microlite Group'
Formula: A2-mTa2X6-wZ-n
Habit: octahedral
Description: Schooner (1958) reports "a few little crystals, associated with triplite and columbite". But there may be confusion with cassiterite.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958), The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Monazite-(Ce)
Formula: Ce(PO4)
Reference: Fred Davis specimen
Muscovite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Habit: anhedral tabular
Colour: silvery to yellowish/rum
Description: Shannon (1920) reports "Occasional crystals of muscovite, which occur in the cleavelandite, are penetrated by flat opaque crystals of green tourmaline." These can be very aesthetic specimens. Cameron et al (1954) note the presence of muscovite books 2 to 18 inches broad and ¼ to 4 inches thick in wall zone of the pegmatite, which was the focus of WWII-era mining.
Reference: Shannon, Earl V. (1920), The Old Lithia Mine in Chatham, Connecticut. American Mineralogist: 5: 82-84.; Cameron, Eugene N., Larrabee David M., McNair, Andrew H., Page, James T., Stewart, Glenn W., and Shainin, Vincent E. (1954), Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; USGS Professional Paper 255.
Opal
Formula: SiO2 · nH2O
Reference: Jones, Robert W. (1960), Luminescent Minerals of Connecticut, a Guide to Their Properties and Locations. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Opal var. Opal-AN
Formula: SiO2 · nH2O
Colour: green
Description: Thin, typically invisible coatings almost always identified by bright green fluorescence under UV light.
Reference: Jones, Robert W. (1960), Luminescent Minerals of Connecticut, a Guide to Their Properties and Locations. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Description: Numerous fractures in the border zone that are perpendicular to the contacts are coated with films of pyrite.
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N., Larrabee David M., McNair, Andrew H., Page, James T., Stewart, Glenn W., and Shainin, Vincent E. (1954), Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; USGS Professional Paper 255.
Pyrrhotite
Formula: Fe1-xS
Description: Accessory mineral in the metamorphic rocks hosting the pegmatite.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958), The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Habit: massive, elongated prismatic
Colour: colorless, milky, lightly smoky
Description: An essential rock-forming component in all zones of the pegmatite, mostly massive. Forms part of an attractive mix with lepidolite/cleavelandite/elbaite. Crystals are very rare, Schooner (1958) and (1961) notes that cavities in albite occasionally yielded crystals up to six inches long.
Reference: Shannon, Earl V. (1920), The Old Lithia Mine in Chatham, Connecticut. American Mineralogist: 5: 82-84.; Cameron, Eugene N., Larrabee David M., McNair, Andrew H., Page, James T., Stewart, Glenn W., and Shainin, Vincent E. (1954), Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; USGS Professional Paper 255.; Schooner, Richard. (1958), The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.; Schooner, Richard. (1961), The Mineralogy of Connecticut. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Quartz var. Smoky Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N., Larrabee David M., McNair, Andrew H., Page, James T., Stewart, Glenn W., and Shainin, Vincent E. (1954), Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; USGS Professional Paper 255.
Scheelite
Formula: Ca(WO4)
Description: Schooner (circa 1990) noted its presence in the metamorphic rocks hosting the pegmatite: "A recent find of scheelite...consists of 1/8 inch crystal sections in brown clinozoisite."
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (circa 1990), Untitled manuscript on central Connecticut mineralogy.
Schorl
Formula: Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Colour: black
Description: An accessory in the intermediate zone, Schooner (1958) noted that some choice ones were occasionally seen.
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N., Larrabee David M., McNair, Andrew H., Page, James T., Stewart, Glenn W., and Shainin, Vincent E. (1954), Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; USGS Professional Paper 255.; Schooner, Richard. (1958), The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Sillimanite
Formula: Al2(SiO4)O
Description: Accessory mineral in the metamorphic rocks hosting the pegmatite.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958), The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Spessartine
Formula: Mn2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Habit: massive
Colour: light orange
Description: The probably garnet species found in masses with blue elbaite and lepidolite hosted by cleavelandite, that look similar to the triplite masses, but more analyses are needed. Schooner (circa 1990) says, "most of it is the typical darker color; but a few specimens, all from the same boulder, show a light orange variety (confirmed by X-ray study)."
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (circa 1990), Untitled manuscript on central Connecticut mineralogy.
Tantalite-(Mn) ?
Formula: Mn2+Ta2O6
Habit: blocky, tabular, skeletal
Colour: reddish black
Description: Some reddish crystals, without supporting data, may be this mineral, but could also be columbite-(Mn).
Triphylite
Formula: LiFe2+PO4
Reference: António Manuel Ináçio Martins
Triplite
Formula: Mn2+2(PO4)F
Habit: massive
Colour: reddish to maroon
Description: As irregular masses, commonly in bunches intergrown with blue elbaite and dark purple lepidolite and hosted by cleavelandite/elbaite/quartz. Tan alteration rind around the edges is probably hydroxylapatite (see below) and Schooner reports finding hureaulite. These minerals are characteristic of alteration from primary lithiophilite but none has ever been reported, so it is difficult to say if the triplite is primary. Masses of garnet may appear similar, but are harder and show a network of rhombic etch patterns on fracture surfaces. Descriptions from the literature are below: Shannon (1920) - "bunches and masses up to several inches across of a flesh red to brownish red material resembling massive garnet, which upon analysis proves to be triplite...In places the triplite has oxidized to a black manganese oxide, which stains the cleavelandite." Foye (1922) - "intimately intergrown with a dark blue, massive tourmaline". Schooner (1958) – "Large masses, up to a foot square, occurred in a mixture of that mineral and cleavelandite. The author was fortunate in securing a large specimen of completely fresh material from a weathered boulder on the oldest dump. Most examples show what are probably crude crystals, bordered with blue tourmaline. Much of the triplite is altered to a cellular tan mineral which has not been thoroughly identified. One piece, evidently from deep in the pegmatite, has undergone a more complex alteration to a foliated dull green substance…negatively identified as not being dickinsonite. Such material could easily be confused with chloritized garnet. Indeed, the fresh triplite resembles massive garnet; its comparative softness and its cleavages should distinguish it. Mary E. Mrose x-rayed this triplite for the author and found it to give a characteristic pattern. E. V. Shannon, who originally described the occurrence in 1920, gave the following analysis: calcium oxide 3.18, magnesium oxide 0.58, iron oxide 4.95, manganese oxide 52.40, phosphorous oxide 32.81, fluorine 9.09, water 0.35, and remainder 1.17. The specific gravity of the sample was 3.58." Schooner (1961) - "Reddish-brown cleavages, bordered with blue tourmaline, definitely identified as such, were apparently quite common in the original lepidolite pit, where that mineral, together with quartz and cleavelandite, occurred as coarse intergrowths. The author found a solid mass, over six inches across, in the old dump there; some of the triplite bodies must easily have been a foot in diameter. In many cases, the triplite is partially or completely altered to a granular yellow or tan mineral; x-ray study proves this to be apatite, of a surprisingly normal kind. This work was done by Peacor."
Reference: Shannon, Earl V. (1920), The Old Lithia Mine in Chatham, Connecticut. American Mineralogist: 5: 82-84.; Schooner, Richard. (1958), The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.; Schooner, Richard. (1961), The Mineralogy of Connecticut. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.; Schooner, Richard. (circa 1990), Untitled manuscript on central Connecticut mineralogy.
Uraninite
Formula: UO2
Colour: black
Description: Schooner (1961) noted that uraninite crystals accompany columbite.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (circa 1990), Untitled manuscript on central Connecticut mineralogy.
Uranophane
Formula: Ca(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
Description: Alteration of uraninite.
Reference: Jones, Robert W. (1960), Luminescent Minerals of Connecticut, a Guide to Their Properties and Locations. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Xanthoxenite ?
Formula: Ca4Fe3+2(PO4)4(OH)2 · 3H2O
Colour: yellow
Description: Schooner (1961) - "[Mary] Mrose [of USGS] x-rayed the altered triplite...and found evidence of this mineral".
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1961), The Mineralogy of Connecticut. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Zircon
Formula: Zr(SiO4)
Description: Accessory mineral in the pegmatite and surrounding metamorphic rocks.
Reference: Fred E. Davis

Gallery:

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Pyrrhotite2.CC.10Fe1-xS
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Cassiterite4.DB.05SnO2
Ixiolite4.DB.25(Ta,Nb,Sn,Fe,Mn)4O8
Magnetite4.BB.05Fe2+Fe3+2O4
'Microlite Group'4.00.A2-mTa2X6-wZ-n
Opal4.DA.10SiO2 · nH2O
var. Opal-AN4.DA.10SiO2 · nH2O
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
var. Smoky Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Tantalite-(Mn) ?4.DB.35Mn2+Ta2O6
Uraninite4.DL.05UO2
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
Scheelite7.GA.05Ca(WO4)
Group 8 - Phosphates, Arsenates and Vanadates
Fluorapatite8.BN.05Ca5(PO4)3F
Grayite8.CJ.45(Th,Pb,Ca)(PO4) · H2O
Hureaulite8.CB.10Mn2+5(PO3OH)2(PO4)2 · 4H2O
Meta-autunite8.EB.10Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6H2O
Monazite-(Ce)8.AD.50Ce(PO4)
Triphylite ?8.AB.10LiFe2+PO4
Triplite8.BB.10Mn2+2(PO4)F
Xanthoxenite ?8.DH.40Ca4Fe3+2(PO4)4(OH)2 · 3H2O
Group 9 - Silicates
Actinolite9.DE.10◻Ca2(Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5)Si8O22OH2
Albite9.FA.35Na(AlSi3O8)
var. Cleavelandite9.FA.35Na(AlSi3O8)
Almandine ?9.AD.25Fe2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Annite9.EC.20KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Bertrandite9.BD.05Be4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Beryl9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
var. Heliodor9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
var. Morganite9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Clinozoisite9.BG.05a{Ca2}{Al3}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Cookeite9.EC.55(Al,Li)3Al2(Si,Al)4O10(OH)8
Diopside9.DA.15CaMgSi2O6
Elbaite9.CK.05Na(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Grossular9.AD.25Ca3Al2(SiO4)3
Helvine9.FB.10Be3Mn2+4(SiO4)3S
Microcline9.FA.30K(AlSi3O8)
Muscovite9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Schorl9.CK.05Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Sillimanite9.AF.05Al2(SiO4)O
Spessartine9.AD.25Mn2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Uranophane9.AK.15Ca(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
Zircon9.AD.30Zr(SiO4)
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Columbite-(Fe)-Columbite-(Mn) Series'-
'Lepidolite'-
'Lithiophilite-Triphylite Series' ?-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Pyrrhotite2.8.10.1Fe1-xS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
AX2
Cassiterite4.4.1.5SnO2
Group 5 - OXIDES CONTAINING URANIUM OR THORIUM
AXO2·xH2O
Uraninite5.1.1.1UO2
Group 7 - MULTIPLE OXIDES
AB2X4
Magnetite7.2.2.3Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Group 8 - MULTIPLE OXIDES CONTAINING NIOBIUM,TANTALUM OR TITANIUM
ABO4
Ixiolite8.1.10.1(Ta,Nb,Sn,Fe,Mn)4O8
A2B2O6(O,OH,F)
'Microlite Group'8.2.2.1A2-mTa2X6-wZ-n
AB2O6
Tantalite-(Mn) ?8.3.2.3Mn2+Ta2O6
Group 38 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL PHOSPHATES, ARSENATES, AND VANADATES
ABXO4
Triphylite ?38.1.1.1LiFe2+PO4
AXO4
Monazite-(Ce)38.4.3.1Ce(PO4)
Group 39 - HYDRATED ACID PHOSPHATES,ARSENATES AND VANADATES
(AB)5[HXO4]2[XO4]2.xH2O
Hureaulite39.2.1.1Mn2+5(PO3OH)2(PO4)2 · 4H2O
Group 40 - HYDRATED NORMAL PHOSPHATES,ARSENATES AND VANADATES
AB2(XO4)2·xH2O, containing (UO2)2+
Meta-autunite40.2a.1.2Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6H2O
(AB)5(XO4)2·xH2O
Grayite40.4.7.4(Th,Pb,Ca)(PO4) · H2O
Group 41 - ANHYDROUS PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
A2(XO4)Zq
Triplite41.6.1.2Mn2+2(PO4)F
A5(XO4)3Zq
Fluorapatite41.8.1.1Ca5(PO4)3F
Group 42 - HYDRATED PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
(AB)3(XO4)2Zq·xH2O
Xanthoxenite ?42.11.15.1Ca4Fe3+2(PO4)4(OH)2 · 3H2O
Group 48 - ANHYDROUS MOLYBDATES AND TUNGSTATES
AXO4
Scheelite48.1.2.1Ca(WO4)
Group 51 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups Only
Insular SiO4 Groups Only with cations in [6] and >[6] coordination
Almandine ?51.4.3a.2Fe2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Grossular51.4.3b.2Ca3Al2(SiO4)3
Spessartine51.4.3a.3Mn2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Insular SiO4 Groups Only with cations in >[6] coordination
Zircon51.5.2.1Zr(SiO4)
Group 52 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups and O,OH,F,H2O
Insular SiO4 Groups and O, OH, F, and H2O with cations in [4] and >[4] coordination
Sillimanite52.2.2a.1Al2(SiO4)O
Group 53 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups and Other Anions or Complex Cations
Insular SiO4 Groups and Other Anions of Complex Cations with (UO2)
Uranophane53.3.1.2Ca(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
Group 56 - SOROSILICATES Si2O7 Groups, With Additional O, OH, F and H2O
Si2O7 Groups and O, OH, F, and H2O with cations in [4] coordination
Bertrandite56.1.1.1Be4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Group 58 - SOROSILICATES Insular, Mixed, Single, and Larger Tetrahedral Groups
Insular, Mixed, Single, and Larger Tetrahedral Groups with cations in [6] and higher coordination; single and double groups (n = 1, 2)
Clinozoisite58.2.1a.4{Ca2}{Al3}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Group 61 - CYCLOSILICATES Six-Membered Rings
Six-Membered Rings with [Si6O18] rings; possible (OH) and Al substitution
Beryl61.1.1.1Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Six-Membered Rings with borate groups
Elbaite61.3.1.8Na(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Schorl61.3.1.10Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Group 65 - INOSILICATES Single-Width,Unbranched Chains,(W=1)
Single-Width Unbranched Chains, W=1 with chains P=2
Diopside65.1.3a.1CaMgSi2O6
Group 71 - PHYLLOSILICATES Sheets of Six-Membered Rings
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 2:1 layers
Annite71.2.2b.3KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Muscovite71.2.2a.1KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Sheets of 6-membered rings interlayered 1:1, 2:1, and octahedra
Cookeite71.4.1.2(Al,Li)3Al2(Si,Al)4O10(OH)8
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with H2O and organics
Opal75.2.1.1SiO2 · nH2O
Group 76 - TECTOSILICATES Al-Si Framework
Al-Si Framework with Al-Si frameworks
Albite76.1.3.1Na(AlSi3O8)
Microcline76.1.1.5K(AlSi3O8)
Al-Si Framework Feldspathoids and related species
Helvine76.2.4.1Be3Mn2+4(SiO4)3S
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
Actinolite-◻Ca2(Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5)Si8O22OH2
Albite
var. Cleavelandite
-Na(AlSi3O8)
Beryl
var. Heliodor
-Be3Al2(Si6O18)
var. Morganite-Be3Al2(Si6O18)
'Columbite-(Fe)-Columbite-(Mn) Series'-
'Lepidolite'-
'Lithiophilite-Triphylite Series' ?-
Opal
var. Opal-AN
-SiO2 · nH2O
Quartz
var. Smoky Quartz
-SiO2

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
H SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
H MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
H Grayite(Th,Pb,Ca)(PO4) · H2O
H OpalSiO2 · nH2O
H Cookeite(Al,Li)3Al2(Si,Al)4O10(OH)8
H HureauliteMn52+(PO3OH)2(PO4)2 · 4H2O
H Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6H2O
H UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
H Opal var. Opal-ANSiO2 · nH2O
H Clinozoisite{Ca2}{Al3}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
H AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H Actinolite◻Ca2(Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5)Si8O22OH2
H XanthoxeniteCa4Fe23+(PO4)4(OH)2 · 3H2O
LiLithium
Li ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Li Cookeite(Al,Li)3Al2(Si,Al)4O10(OH)8
Li TriphyliteLiFe2+PO4
BeBeryllium
Be Beryl var. MorganiteBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Be BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Be Beryl var. HeliodorBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Be BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Be HelvineBe3Mn42+(SiO4)3S
BBoron
B ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
B SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
OOxygen
O Ixiolite(Ta,Nb,Sn,Fe,Mn)4O8
O Albite var. CleavelanditeNa(AlSi3O8)
O Beryl var. MorganiteBe3Al2(Si6O18)
O TripliteMn22+(PO4)F
O ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
O SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
O MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
O CassiteriteSnO2
O Beryl var. HeliodorBe3Al2(Si6O18)
O SpessartineMn32+Al2(SiO4)3
O QuartzSiO2
O BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
O Grayite(Th,Pb,Ca)(PO4) · H2O
O Monazite-(Ce)Ce(PO4)
O MagnetiteFe2+Fe23+O4
O OpalSiO2 · nH2O
O FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
O ZirconZr(SiO4)
O Cookeite(Al,Li)3Al2(Si,Al)4O10(OH)8
O HureauliteMn52+(PO3OH)2(PO4)2 · 4H2O
O HelvineBe3Mn42+(SiO4)3S
O ScheeliteCa(WO4)
O UraniniteUO2
O Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6H2O
O UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
O Opal var. Opal-ANSiO2 · nH2O
O AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
O MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
O Quartz var. Smoky QuartzSiO2
O Clinozoisite{Ca2}{Al3}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
O AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O Actinolite◻Ca2(Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5)Si8O22OH2
O GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
O DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
O SillimaniteAl2(SiO4)O
O Tantalite-(Mn)Mn2+Ta2O6
O AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
O XanthoxeniteCa4Fe23+(PO4)4(OH)2 · 3H2O
O TriphyliteLiFe2+PO4
FFluorine
F TripliteMn22+(PO4)F
F FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
NaSodium
Na Albite var. CleavelanditeNa(AlSi3O8)
Na ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Na SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Na AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
MgMagnesium
Mg Actinolite◻Ca2(Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5)Si8O22OH2
Mg DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
AlAluminium
Al Albite var. CleavelanditeNa(AlSi3O8)
Al Beryl var. MorganiteBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Al ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Al SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Al MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Al Beryl var. HeliodorBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Al SpessartineMn32+Al2(SiO4)3
Al Cookeite(Al,Li)3Al2(Si,Al)4O10(OH)8
Al AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Al MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
Al Clinozoisite{Ca2}{Al3}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Al AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
Al SillimaniteAl2(SiO4)O
Al AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
SiSilicon
Si Albite var. CleavelanditeNa(AlSi3O8)
Si Beryl var. MorganiteBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Si ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Si SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Si MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Si Beryl var. HeliodorBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Si SpessartineMn32+Al2(SiO4)3
Si QuartzSiO2
Si BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Si OpalSiO2 · nH2O
Si ZirconZr(SiO4)
Si Cookeite(Al,Li)3Al2(Si,Al)4O10(OH)8
Si HelvineBe3Mn42+(SiO4)3S
Si UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
Si Opal var. Opal-ANSiO2 · nH2O
Si AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Si MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
Si Quartz var. Smoky QuartzSiO2
Si Clinozoisite{Ca2}{Al3}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Si AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si Actinolite◻Ca2(Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5)Si8O22OH2
Si GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
Si DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Si SillimaniteAl2(SiO4)O
Si AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
PPhosphorus
P TripliteMn22+(PO4)F
P Grayite(Th,Pb,Ca)(PO4) · H2O
P Monazite-(Ce)Ce(PO4)
P FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
P HureauliteMn52+(PO3OH)2(PO4)2 · 4H2O
P Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6H2O
P XanthoxeniteCa4Fe23+(PO4)4(OH)2 · 3H2O
P TriphyliteLiFe2+PO4
SSulfur
S PyriteFeS2
S HelvineBe3Mn42+(SiO4)3S
S PyrrhotiteFe1-xS
KPotassium
K MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
K AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
CaCalcium
Ca Grayite(Th,Pb,Ca)(PO4) · H2O
Ca FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
Ca ScheeliteCa(WO4)
Ca Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6H2O
Ca UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
Ca Clinozoisite{Ca2}{Al3}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Ca Actinolite◻Ca2(Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5)Si8O22OH2
Ca GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
Ca DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Ca XanthoxeniteCa4Fe23+(PO4)4(OH)2 · 3H2O
MnManganese
Mn Ixiolite(Ta,Nb,Sn,Fe,Mn)4O8
Mn TripliteMn22+(PO4)F
Mn SpessartineMn32+Al2(SiO4)3
Mn HureauliteMn52+(PO3OH)2(PO4)2 · 4H2O
Mn HelvineBe3Mn42+(SiO4)3S
Mn Tantalite-(Mn)Mn2+Ta2O6
FeIron
Fe Ixiolite(Ta,Nb,Sn,Fe,Mn)4O8
Fe SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Fe MagnetiteFe2+Fe23+O4
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Fe Actinolite◻Ca2(Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5)Si8O22OH2
Fe PyrrhotiteFe1-xS
Fe AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
Fe XanthoxeniteCa4Fe23+(PO4)4(OH)2 · 3H2O
Fe TriphyliteLiFe2+PO4
ZrZirconium
Zr ZirconZr(SiO4)
NbNiobium
Nb Ixiolite(Ta,Nb,Sn,Fe,Mn)4O8
SnTin
Sn Ixiolite(Ta,Nb,Sn,Fe,Mn)4O8
Sn CassiteriteSnO2
CeCerium
Ce Monazite-(Ce)Ce(PO4)
TaTantalum
Ta Ixiolite(Ta,Nb,Sn,Fe,Mn)4O8
Ta Microlite GroupA2-mTa2X6-wZ-n
Ta Tantalite-(Mn)Mn2+Ta2O6
WTungsten
W ScheeliteCa(WO4)
PbLead
Pb Grayite(Th,Pb,Ca)(PO4) · H2O
ThThorium
Th Grayite(Th,Pb,Ca)(PO4) · H2O
UUranium
U UraniniteUO2
U Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6H2O
U UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O

References

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Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Swanson, Olaf P. and H. S. Wiliams. (1899), Lease agreement. Haddam Land Records: 44: 562-563.
Shannon, Earl V. (1920), The Old Lithia Mine in Chatham, Connecticut. American Mineralogist: 5: 82-84.
Foye, W. G. (1922), Mineral Localities in the Vicinity of Middletown, Connecticut. American Mineralogist, 7: 4-12.
Schairer, J. F. (1931), The Minerals of Connecticut. State Geological and Natural History Survey Bulletin 51.
Anonymous. (1937) East Hampton Is Mecca For Geologists. The East Hampton News, July 2, 1937: 6(1).
Ingerson, Earl (1938), Uraninite and Associated Minerals from Haddam Neck, Connecticut. American Mineralogist: 23: 269.
Hess, Frank L.; Roscoe J. Whitney; Joseph Trefethen; Morris Slavin. (1943) The Rare Alkalies in New England. U.S. Bureau of Mines Information Circular 7232: 47-8.
Williams, Horace S. (circa 1945): Article for New York Society of Mineralogists. Brainerd Public Library, Haddam, Connecticut.
Cameron, Eugene N., Larrabee David M., McNair, Andrew H., Page, James T., Stewart, Glenn W., and Shainin, Vincent E. (1954), Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; USGS Professional Paper 255.
Schooner, Richard. (1958), The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Stugard, Frederick, Jr. (1958), Pegmatites of the Middletown Area, Connecticut. USGS Bulletin 1042-Q.
Jones, Robert W. (1960), Luminescent Minerals of Connecticut, a Guide to Their Properties and Locations. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Schooner, Richard. (1961), The Mineralogy of Connecticut. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Ryerson, Kathleen H. (1972), Rock Hound's Guide to Connecticut. Pequot Press.
London, David. (1985), Pegmatites of the Middletown District, Connecticut. State Geological and Natural History Survey of Connecticut, Department of Environmental Protection, Guidebook No. 6: 509-533.
Jarnot, Bruce M. (1989): Minerals New to the Portland Area Pegmatites of Central Connecticut. Abstract in: Contributed Papers in Specimen Mineralogy, 16th Rochester Mineralogical Symposium. Rocks & Minerals: 64(6): 471.
Schooner, Richard. (circa 1990), Untitled manuscript on central Connecticut mineralogy.
Jarnot, Bruce (1995), Connecticut Gems & Gem Minerals. Rocks & Minerals: 70:(6): 379.
Weber, Marcelle H. and Sullivan, Earle C. (1995), Connecticut Mineral Locality Index. Rocks & Minerals: 70:(6): 403.

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