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Morris Dam Quarry (East Morris Dam), Morris, Litchfield Co., Connecticut, USAi
Regional Level Types
Morris Dam Quarry (East Morris Dam)Quarry
Morris- not defined -
Litchfield Co.County
ConnecticutState
USACountry

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Key
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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 41° 40' 27'' North , 73° 8' 49'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 41.67417,-73.14722
GeoHash:G#: dr7vp6xcd
Locality type:Quarry
Köppen climate type:Dfb : Warm-summer humid continental climate


A quarry created at the top of the hill immediately west of Morris Dam used for fill for the dam when it was built between 1909-1918. The Morris Reservoir is for the City of Waterbury potable water supply and access to the quarry is prohibited (see Mindat thread below), although collecting trips were common there before some time in the late 1990s.

The quarry worked a small outlier pluton of the extensive Devonian Nonewaug Granite. The granite contains many common pegmatitic zones, including miarolitic cavities that produced minerals very similar to those found in the more famous granites of Moat Mountain, New Hampshire - mostly smoky quartz and microcline crystals - some very large (>30 cm) - and albite. Many loose quartz crystals have distorted shapes resulting from recrystallized overgrowths on quartz fragments caused by pocket shattering during crystallization.

Very little has been written about this locality, it appears in only a couple of guides. Surprisingly it is not mentioned by Schooner's 1961 Mineralogy of Connecticut. Januzzi and Seaman (1976) wrote about finding "a pocket containing one hundred crystals at Morris; it has produced scores of beautiful smoky quartz crystals that have found their way into countless mineral collections in this section of the country." and "incrustations of tiny [bertrandite] crystals on smoky quartz at the dam site at East Morris; feldspar crystals are sometimes associated with the bertrandite." Henderson (1975) includes it in his list of Connecticut bertrandite localities.

Regions containing this locality

North America Plate

Plate - 4,949 mineral species & varietal names listed

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


9 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Albite
Formula: Na(AlSi3O8)
Habit: equant or tabular
Colour: white
Description: Mostly as a rock-forming component of the host pegmatite, small crystals lining cavities, or as hemispheres of cleavelandite
Reference: W.C. van Laer: field notes, 1977
Albite var: Cleavelandite
Formula: Na(AlSi3O8)
Habit: tabular
Colour: white
Description: As hemispherical aggregates in cavities
Reference: Weber, Marcelle H. and Earle C. Sullivan (1995): Connecticut Mineral Locality Index. Rocks & Minerals (Connecticut Issue): 70(6): 398.
'Almandine-Spessartine Series'
Habit: trapezohedral
Colour: burgundy
Description: Small crystals in pegmatite matrix, species is probably almandine but testing is needed to confirm.
Reference: Mike Polletta collection
Bertrandite
Formula: Be4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Description: micro-crystals in cavities
Reference: Henderson, William A., Jr. (1975), The Bertrandites of Connecticut. Mineralogical Record: 6(3): 114-123.
Beryl
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Habit: subhedral hexagonal elongated prisms
Colour: pale yellow to pale green
Reference: No reference listed
'Columbite-(Fe)-Columbite-(Mn) Series'
Colour: black
Reference: Weber, Marcelle H. and Earle C. Sullivan (1995): Connecticut Mineral Locality Index. Rocks & Minerals (Connecticut Issue): 70(6): 398.
Fluorapatite
Formula: Ca5(PO4)3F
Reference: John Burnham Collection
Meta-autunite
Formula: Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
Reference: Weber, Marcelle H. and Earle C. Sullivan (1995): Connecticut Mineral Locality Index. Rocks & Minerals (Connecticut Issue): 70(6): 398.
Microcline
Formula: K(AlSi3O8)
Habit: blocky, elongated Baveno twins
Colour: white to tan
Description: Mainly as a rock-forming component of the host pegmatite, but crystals in cavities can be very large (>30 cm) - some are on display at the Yale Peabody Museum.
Reference: W.C. van Laer: field notes, 1977; Yale Peabody Museum collection
Muscovite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Habit: tabular
Description: Mainly as an accessory mineral in the host pegmatite, small crystals found in cavities
Reference: W.C. van Laer: field notes, 1977
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Habit: short to elongated prismatic with rhombohedral terminations. Many loose quartz crystals have distorted shapes resulting from recrystallized overgrowths on quartz fragments caused by pocket shattering during crystallization.
Colour: milky to smoky
Description: Primarily as a rock-forming component of the host pegmatite, but crystals in cavities can be very large - >30 cm.
Reference: Januzzi, Ronald E. and David Seaman. (1976), Mineral Localities Connecticut and Southeastern New York State and Pegmatite Minerals of the World. The Mineralogical Press, Danbury, Connecticut.
Quartz var: Milky Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Colour: milky
Description: Mainly as a rock-forming component of the host pegmatite.
Reference: various added photos
Quartz var: Smoky Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Habit: short to elongated prismatic with rhombohedral terminations. Many loose quartz crystals have distorted shapes resulting from recrystallized overgrowths on quartz fragments caused by pocket shattering during crystallization.
Colour: gray to brown
Description: Primarily as a rock-forming component of the host pegmatite, but crystals in cavities can be very large - >30 cm.
Reference: Januzzi, Ronald E. and David Seaman. (1976), Mineral Localities Connecticut and Southeastern New York State and Pegmatite Minerals of the World. The Mineralogical Press, Danbury, Connecticut.
Schorl
Formula: Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Habit: prismatic
Colour: black
Reference: John Burnham

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
var: Milky Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
var: Smoky Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Group 8 - Phosphates, Arsenates and Vanadates
Fluorapatite8.BN.05Ca5(PO4)3F
Meta-autunite8.EB.10Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
Group 9 - Silicates
'Albite'9.FA.35Na(AlSi3O8)
var: Cleavelandite9.FA.35Na(AlSi3O8)
'Bertrandite'9.BD.05Be4(Si2O7)(OH)2
'Beryl'9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Microcline9.FA.30K(AlSi3O8)
Muscovite9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Schorl9.CK.05Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Almandine-Spessartine Series'-
Columbite-(Fe)-Columbite-(Mn) Series-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 40 - HYDRATED NORMAL PHOSPHATES,ARSENATES AND VANADATES
AB2(XO4)2·xH2O, containing (UO2)2+
Meta-autunite40.2a.1.2Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
Group 41 - ANHYDROUS PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
A5(XO4)3Zq
Fluorapatite41.8.1.1Ca5(PO4)3F
Group 56 - SOROSILICATES Si2O7 Groups, With Additional O, OH, F and H2O
Si2O7 Groups and O, OH, F, and H2O with cations in [4] coordination
Bertrandite56.1.1.1Be4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Group 61 - CYCLOSILICATES Six-Membered Rings
Six-Membered Rings with [Si6O18] rings; possible (OH) and Al substitution
Beryl61.1.1.1Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Six-Membered Rings with borate groups
Schorl61.3.1.10Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Group 71 - PHYLLOSILICATES Sheets of Six-Membered Rings
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 2:1 layers
Muscovite71.2.2a.1KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Group 76 - TECTOSILICATES Al-Si Framework
Al-Si Framework with Al-Si frameworks
Albite76.1.3.1Na(AlSi3O8)
Microcline76.1.1.5K(AlSi3O8)
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
Albite
var: Cleavelandite
-Na(AlSi3O8)
'Almandine-Spessartine Series'-
'Columbite-(Fe)-Columbite-(Mn) Series'-
Quartz
var: Milky Quartz
-SiO2
var: Smoky Quartz-SiO2

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
H Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
H MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
BeBeryllium
Be BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Be BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
BBoron
B SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
OOxygen
O AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
O BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
O BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
O Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
O FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
O Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
O MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
O Quartz (var: Milky Quartz)SiO2
O MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O QuartzSiO2
O SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
O Quartz (var: Smoky Quartz)SiO2
FFluorine
F FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
NaSodium
Na AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Na Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
Na SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
AlAluminium
Al AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Al BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Al Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
Al MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
Al MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
SiSilicon
Si AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Si BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Si BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Si Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
Si MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
Si Quartz (var: Milky Quartz)SiO2
Si MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si QuartzSiO2
Si SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Si Quartz (var: Smoky Quartz)SiO2
PPhosphorus
P FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
P Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
KPotassium
K MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
K MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
CaCalcium
Ca FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
Ca Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
FeIron
Fe SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
UUranium
U Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Ordovician - Neoproterozoic
443.8 - 1000 Ma



ID: 3190671
Precambrian-Phanerozoic sedimentary rocks

Age: Neoproterozoic to Ordovician (443.8 - 1000 Ma)

Lithology: Mudstone-carbonate-sandstone-conglomerate

Reference: Chorlton, L.B. Generalized geology of the world: bedrock domains and major faults in GIS format: a small-scale world geology map with an extended geological attribute database. doi: 10.4095/223767. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 5529. [154]

Early Ordovician
470 - 485.4 Ma



ID: 3020282
Ratlum Mountain Schist

Age: Early Ordovician (470 - 485.4 Ma)

Stratigraphic Name: Ratlum Mountain Schist

Description: Gray, medium-grained, interlayered schist and granofels, composed of quartz, oligoclase, muscovite (in the schist), biotite, and garnet, also staurolite and kyanite in the schist. Numerous layers and lenses of amphibolite; also some of quartz-spessartine (coticule) and calc-silicate rock.

Comments: Part of Central Lowlands; Iapetus (Oceanic) Terrane - Connecticut Valley Synclinorium; Hartland Belt. Equivalents of Savoy Schist of Massachusetts (Emerson, 1898, 1917) (CT009, CT010) and of Moretown Formation of Vermont and Massachusetts (Bedrock Geologic Map of Massachusetts, Zen and others, 1983) (CT011) (includes Golden Hill and Ratlum Mountain Schists) (Lower? Ordovician). Original map source: Connecticut Geological and Natural History Survey, DEP, in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey, 2000, Bedrock Geology of Connecticut, shapefile, scale 1:50,000

Lithology: Major:{schist,granofels}, Minor:{amphibolite}, Incidental:{calc silicate rock}

Reference: Horton, J.D., C.A. San Juan, and D.B. Stoeser. The State Geologic Map Compilation (SGMC) geodatabase of the conterminous United States. doi: 10.3133/ds1052. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1052. [133]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
New Haven Mineral Club. (1940), Club and Society Notes. Rocks & Minerals: 15(10): 348.
Hiller, John, Jr. (1971), Connecticut Mines and Minerals. Privately published.
Henderson, William A., Jr. (1975), The Bertrandites of Connecticut. Mineralogical Record: 6(3): 114-123.
Januzzi, Ronald E. and David Seaman. (1976), Mineral Localities Connecticut and Southeastern New York State and Pegmatite Minerals of the World. The Mineralogical Press, Danbury, Connecticut.
van Laer, W. C. (1977), field notes (unpublished).
Webster, Bud. (1978), Mineral Collector’s Field Guide Connecticut. Privately Published.
Weber, Marcelle H. and Earle C. Sullivan (1995): Connecticut Mineral Locality Index. Rocks & Minerals (Connecticut Issue): 70(6): 398.

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