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New England Mining Company Quarry (Roebling Mine; Hewitt's Mine), Upper Merryall, New Milford, Litchfield Co., Connecticut, USAi
Regional Level Types
New England Mining Company Quarry (Roebling Mine; Hewitt's Mine)Quarry
Upper Merryall- not defined -
New Milford- not defined -
Litchfield Co.County
ConnecticutState
USACountry

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Key
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
41° 39' 22'' North , 73° 26' 5'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Locality type:
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
New Preston1,182 (2017)7.2km
Kent2,858 (2017)8.4km
New Milford6,523 (2017)9.1km
Sherman3,827 (2017)9.9km
Washington3,466 (2017)10.7km


Several granite pegmatites that, according to Sterrett (1923), were first mined by the New England Mining Co. (Elwell, 1937) in 2 quarries for mica and feldspar between 1880-1900, but gem beryl proved to be a valuable by-product. Many crystals of beryl, some of them more than a foot in diameter, were found in the quarry. In 1896 4,000 gemstones were reportedly cut (Hawes, 1984). Five cut beryl gemstones of various colors "all from Litchfield County" (Clarke, 1889) were donated to the Smithsonian. The catalog (Merrill, 1922) also shows two others, the largest of all being 40.44 carats (no. 1037). At that time the mine was owned by S. L. Wilson and George Roebling. The operation was financed in part by Washington A. Roebling of New Jersey, an avid mineralogist and son of Brooklyn Bridge designer John A. Roebling.

At the turn of the century, new operators discovered uranium salts there and charged patrons to sit and bask in natural radiation thought to cure arthritis (Hawes, 1984).

George Roebling solely owned it in 1914, when he still had a few specimens showing the quality of the gem material.

Cameron and others (1954) reported that in 1944 the property was owned by Henry Orzech. One ton of beryl is said to have been recovered from the no. 1 quarry by Mr. Orzech’s sons since 1936. It was worked sporadically after then. In the summer of 1944, Cyril Ulman of Guilford, Conn., worked the no. 2 quarry for mica for a period of 2 weeks.

Inspired by Roebling's finds, prospector Howard Hewitt worked the property extensively for gem beryl from at least 1953 until the 1970s. In August 1953, Hewitt shipped 2,300 pounds of beryl to the Beryllium Corporation in Reading, Pennsylvania, which may have netted him between $300 and $600/ton (Anonymous, 1953). During the 1970s until his death in 1981, Howard Hewitt reportedly worked Roebling only sporadically. During this time he worked mainly at the Sawmill Quarry in Haddam (after his brother Herb, who had previously worked Sawmill, passed away).

After Howard, the quarry was more vigorously worked for gem beryl, much of the remaining intact pegmatite was quarried and, with previously loose material, was screened through a trommel.

As of 2013, the property is still owned by the Orzech family and remains closed.

Note: Collectors who were there in the 1970s report seeing minerals from the Sawmill Quarry near Howard's work shack at Roebling. A 1970s advertisement the Hewitt's created shows gemstones mostly from Roebling, but also from Sawmill. The Hewitt's also traded minerals with the owners of the Slocum Prospect http://www.mindat.org/loc-6346.html in East Hampton, Conn. and the Walden Gem Mine http://www.mindat.org/loc-6749.html in Portland, Conn. (both fee collecting sites in the 1960s and 1970s). So some specimens in collections reportedly from or associated with Roebling material may be from these other localities.

The best geological description comes from Cameron et al (1954), below are excerpts:

The workings consist of two opencuts, from one of which a short underground crosscut and drift have been run. The no. 1 quarry is 420 feet long and 60 feet in maximum width and depth. It is covered by vegetation and partly backfilled. The no. 2 quarry is 90 feet long, 40 feet wide and 20 feet deep.

Five pegmatite sheets or lenses have been mined. The bodies dip moderately to steeply northwest and are enclosed in silicified quartz-mica schist [Dalton Formation]. The schist has been injected with narrow pegmatites. Contact metamorphism has produced abundant subhedral metacrysts of garnet and tourmaline in the schist adjacent to the contacts with pegmatite.

The no. 1 quarry is in a pegmatite body that averages 30 feet in thickness, strikes N. 55° E., and dips 60° NW. Sterrett (p. 64) states that it is reported to be thinner near the bottom of the cut than at the surface. The small part of the pegmatite exposed in 1944 consisted of three lithologic units:

1. Border zone, lying adjacent to the wall rock contact.
2. Perthite [microcline]-quartz zone, lying inside the border zone. [This zone contained visible beryl in 1944]
3. Muscovite-perthite [microcline] unit, poorly exposed near the center of the pegmatite.

Accessory minerals are biotite [annite], and tourmaline [schorl], garnet [probably almandine], and beryl.

Four pegmatites (A to D, fig. 125) are exposed in the no. 2 quarry. They strike N. 40° E. and dip to the north at moderate to steep angles. Probably the two northermost pegmatites are roots of a single pegmatite which lay directly above the present topographic surface. Outcrops on the southwestern side of the quarry indicate a similar relationship between the two southernmost pegmatites.

The pegmatites range from 5 to 20 feet in thickness and consist essentially of quartz and perthite [microcline] with various amounts of muscovite, plagioclase [albite], and accessory biotite [annite], and tourmaline [schorl], garnet [probably almandine], and beryl. Small biotite [annite] and muscovite books occur as fracture fillings in joints cutting pegmatite A.


Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


19 valid minerals. 1 erroneous literature entry.

Rock Types Recorded

Note: this is a very new system on mindat.org and data is currently VERY limited. Please bear with us while we work towards adding this information!

Select Rock List Type

Alphabetical List Tree Diagram

Detailed Mineral List:

Albite
Formula: Na(AlSi3O8)
Habit: anhedral
Colour: white
Description: Major component of the pegmatite.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State; USGS Prof Paper 255; Rocks & Minerals (1995) 70:396-409
Almandine
Formula: Fe2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Habit: trapezohedral and rhombic dodecahedral
Colour: maroon to nearly black
Description: An accessory in the pegmatites, also abundant subhedral metacrysts of garnet in the schist adjacent to the contacts with pegmatite. Januzzi (1959) reports finding in one isolated pegmatite mass, scores of two types of garnet crystals having both distinct dodecahedral and trapezohedral forms. Ewell (1937) writes: "The garnets were extra large, some weighing one pound each."
Reference: Van King; USGS Prof Paper 255; Januzzi (1959); Elwell, Wilbur. (1937): Some Old Localities in Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals, vol 12, no. 9, pp. 270-1.
Annite
Formula: KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Habit: anhedral
Colour: black
Description: fka biotite, a minor accessory in the pegmatites.
Reference: Januzzi (1976): Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State; Cameron et al (1954): USGS Prof Paper 255
Bertrandite ?
Formula: Be4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Description: Included in the reference in a list of minerals with no supporting information.
Reference: Januzzi (1976): Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State
Beryl
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Habit: anhedral elongated prisms
Colour: pale green, yellow to honey, blue
Description: According to Cameron et al (1954), beryl is concentrated in the quartz-perthitic microcline zone in the the southwest half of no. 1 quarry as pale greenish-white, short, subhedral prisms, 3 inches in average length and 2 inches in average diameter. A 300-pound block of quartz and plagioclase found in the backfill contains at least 8 percent beryl. Also an accessory of the pegmatites in the no. 2 quarry. Sterrett (1923) reports “many crystals of beryl, some of them more than a foot in diameter”. Crystals are usually sheathed in mica and are poorly formed but internally contain some of the best gem beryl rough found in Connecticut.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State; USGS Prof Paper 255; Rocks & Minerals (1995) 70:396-409; Elwell, Wilbur. (1937): Some Old Localities in Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals, vol 12, no. 9, pp. 270-1.
Beryl var: Aquamarine
Formula: Be3Al2Si6O18
Habit: subhedral elongated prisms
Colour: blue, blue-green
Description: Much more rare than the common green beryl or yellow beryl, but a 40.44-carat aquamarine (no. 1037) is in the Smithsonian.
Reference: Elwell, Wilbur. (1937): Some Old Localities in Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals, vol 12, no. 9, pp. 270-1.; Rocks & Minerals (1995) 70:396-409
Beryl var: Heliodor
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Colour: yellow to honey
Description: Crystals poorly formed, but internally hide some of the best gem rough from Connecticut, with deep golden yellow to honey color.
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 70:379; Elwell, Wilbur. (1937): Some Old Localities in Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals, vol 12, no. 9, pp. 270-1.
Columbite-(Fe)
Formula: Fe2+Nb2O6
Reference: Elwell, Wilbur. (1937): Some Old Localities in Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals, vol 12, no. 9, pp. 270-1.
Fluorapatite
Formula: Ca5(PO4)3F
Description: Included in just a list of minerals in one reference, but it is such a common accessory that it is certainly present.
Reference: Januzzi (1976): Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State
'Garnet Group'
Formula: X3Z2(SiO4)3
Description: Probably almandine as is most pegmatitic garnet in Connecticut.
Reference: Ryerson, Kathleen H. (1972) Rock Hounds Guide to Connecticut
'Gummite'
Description: Associated with uraninite, meta-autunite, uranophane, other alteration products. Fine gummite and uranophane pseudomorphs after uraninite have been found here.
Reference: Januzzi (1976): Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State
Hematite ?
Formula: Fe2O3
Description: Included in the reference in a list of minerals with no supporting documentation.
Reference: Januzzi (1976): Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State
'Limonite'
Formula: (Fe,O,OH,H2O)
Description: Common surficial alteration product staining other rocks and minerals.
Reference: Januzzi (1976): Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State
Meta-autunite
Formula: Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
Description: Associated with uraninite, uranophane, "gummite" and other alteration products.
Reference: Januzzi (1959); Elwell, Wilbur. (1937): Some Old Localities in Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals, vol 12, no. 9, pp. 270-1.
Metatorbernite
Formula: Cu(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 8H2O
Description: Associated with uraninite, meta-autunite, uranophane, "gummite" and other alteration products.
Reference: Januzzi (1976): Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State
Microcline
Formula: K(AlSi3O8)
Habit: anhedral
Description: A major component of the pegmatites. In the perthitic microcline-quartz zone of the No.1 quarry, in large anhedral crystals as much as 10 feet long. In the eastern part of the north wall, the zone is richest in massive perthitic microcline toward the center of the pegmatite, and this suggests the presence of a perthitic microcline core. Locally, the microcline is veined and partly replaced with granular milky quartz, deformed muscovite and pink-red garnet. Graphic granite is fairly common.
Reference: Cameron and other (1954): Pegmatite Investigations New England. USGS Prof. Paper 255.
Muscovite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Habit: tabular subhedral
Colour: green to pale ruby
Description: In the microcline-quartz zone of the no. 1 quarry it occurs in small quantities as books 3 inches in diameter. The muscovite-microcline unit of this pegmatite consists chiefly of diversely oriented scrap muscovite books forming 70 to 90 percent of the total volume. One block of “solid mica” of irregular shape blasted loose from this zone measured 4 feet thick and 8 feet long. http://www.mindat.org/photo-204409.html Crystals average 1 inch in diameter but range from 1/8 to 6 inches across. There are three types of mica deposits in the 4 pegmatites of the no. 2 quarry: pod, wall-zone, and disseminated. Pegmatite A has a concentration of books as much as 1 foot in diameter, Pegmatite B exhibits a lean book mica-bearing zone composed of quartz, albite, and muscovite. The books are 3 to 4 inches in average diameter. Pegmatites C and D are disseminated mica deposits.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State; USGS Prof Paper 255, Sterrett (1923)
Opal
Formula: SiO2 · nH2O
Habit: encrustations
Fluorescence: green
Description: Commonly forms crusts in cracks and joints in pegmatites, best found by its bright green fluorescence under SW UV illumination.
Reference: Januzzi (1976): Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State
Opal var: Opal-AN
Formula: SiO2 · nH2O
Habit: encrustations
Fluorescence: green
Description: Commonly forms crusts in cracks and joints in pegmatites, best found by its bright green fluorescence under SW UV illumination.
Reference: Januzzi (1976): Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State
Phosphuranylite
Formula: (H3O)3KCa(UO2)7(PO4)4O4 · 8H2O
Pyrolusite
Formula: Mn4+O2
Description: No pyrolusite dendrite or staining in a granite pegmatite in the world has been verified as pyrolusite. The name was a mistake in the nineteenth century which has been widely publicized.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Habit: anhedral
Colour: milky to smoky
Description: Major component of the pegmatite.
Reference: Januzzi, 1976. Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State; USGS Prof Paper 255
Schorl
Formula: Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Habit: subhedral, elongated prisms
Colour: black
Description: Common accessory in the pegmatites, especially in the border zone forming subhedral needles from ¼ inch to 3 inches long, oriented normal to the contact, and in the surrounding schist.
Reference: Januzzi, (1976): Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State;
'Tourmaline'
Formula: A(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
Reference: Elwell, Wilbur. (1937): Some Old Localities in Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals, vol 12, no. 9, pp. 270-1.; USGS Prof Paper 255
Uraninite
Formula: UO2
Habit: octahedral
Description: Associated with secondaries, sometimes pseudomorphed by uranophane and "gummite".
Reference: Januzzi (1976): Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State; Rocks & Minerals (1995) 70:396-409
Uranophane
Formula: Ca(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
Description: Associated with uraninite, meta-autunite, "gummite", other alteration products. Fine gummite and uranophane pseudomorphs after uraninite have been found here.
Reference: Januzzi (1976): Mineral Localities of CT and Southeastern NY State
Zircon
Formula: Zr(SiO4)
Colour: brown
Description: Accessory in the pegmatites.
Reference: Fred E Davis collection

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Columbite-(Fe)4.DB.35Fe2+Nb2O6
Hematite ?4.CB.05Fe2O3
Opal4.DA.10SiO2 · nH2O
var: Opal-AN4.DA.10SiO2 · nH2O
Pyrolusite ?4.DB.05Mn4+O2
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Uraninite4.DL.05UO2
Group 8 - Phosphates, Arsenates and Vanadates
Fluorapatite8.BN.05Ca5(PO4)3F
Meta-autunite8.EB.10Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
Metatorbernite8.EB.10Cu(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 8H2O
Phosphuranylite8.EC.10(H3O)3KCa(UO2)7(PO4)4O4 · 8H2O
Group 9 - Silicates
Albite9.FA.35Na(AlSi3O8)
Almandine9.AD.25Fe2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Annite9.EC.20KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Bertrandite ?9.BD.05Be4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Beryl9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
var: Aquamarine9.CJ.05Be3Al2Si6O18
var: Heliodor9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Microcline9.FA.30K(AlSi3O8)
Muscovite9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Schorl9.CK.05Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Uranophane9.AK.15Ca(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
Zircon9.AD.30Zr(SiO4)
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Garnet Group'-X3Z2(SiO4)3
'Gummite'-
'Limonite'-(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
'Tourmaline'-A(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
A2X3
Hematite ?4.3.1.2Fe2O3
AX2
Pyrolusite ?4.4.1.4Mn4+O2
Group 5 - OXIDES CONTAINING URANIUM OR THORIUM
AXO2·xH2O
Uraninite5.1.1.1UO2
Group 8 - MULTIPLE OXIDES CONTAINING NIOBIUM,TANTALUM OR TITANIUM
AB2O6
Columbite-(Fe)8.3.2.2Fe2+Nb2O6
Group 40 - HYDRATED NORMAL PHOSPHATES,ARSENATES AND VANADATES
AB2(XO4)2·xH2O, containing (UO2)2+
Meta-autunite40.2a.1.2Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
Metatorbernite40.2a.13.2Cu(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 8H2O
Group 41 - ANHYDROUS PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
A5(XO4)3Zq
Fluorapatite41.8.1.1Ca5(PO4)3F
Group 42 - HYDRATED PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
(AB)5(XO4)2Zq·xH2O
Phosphuranylite42.4.8.1(H3O)3KCa(UO2)7(PO4)4O4 · 8H2O
Group 51 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups Only
Insular SiO4 Groups Only with cations in [6] and >[6] coordination
Almandine51.4.3a.2Fe2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Insular SiO4 Groups Only with cations in >[6] coordination
Zircon51.5.2.1Zr(SiO4)
Group 53 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups and Other Anions or Complex Cations
Insular SiO4 Groups and Other Anions of Complex Cations with (UO2)
Uranophane53.3.1.2Ca(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
Group 56 - SOROSILICATES Si2O7 Groups, With Additional O, OH, F and H2O
Si2O7 Groups and O, OH, F, and H2O with cations in [4] coordination
Bertrandite ?56.1.1.1Be4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Group 61 - CYCLOSILICATES Six-Membered Rings
Six-Membered Rings with [Si6O18] rings; possible (OH) and Al substitution
Beryl61.1.1.1Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Six-Membered Rings with borate groups
Schorl61.3.1.10Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Group 71 - PHYLLOSILICATES Sheets of Six-Membered Rings
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 2:1 layers
Annite71.2.2b.3KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Muscovite71.2.2a.1KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with H2O and organics
Opal75.2.1.1SiO2 · nH2O
Group 76 - TECTOSILICATES Al-Si Framework
Al-Si Framework with Al-Si frameworks
Albite76.1.3.1Na(AlSi3O8)
Microcline76.1.1.5K(AlSi3O8)
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
Beryl
var: Aquamarine
-Be3Al2Si6O18
var: Heliodor-Be3Al2(Si6O18)
'Garnet Group'-X3Z2(SiO4)3
'Gummite'-
'Limonite'-(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
Opal
var: Opal-AN
-SiO2 · nH2O
'Tourmaline'-A(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
H Opal (var: Opal-AN)SiO2 · nH2O
H Limonite(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
H Phosphuranylite(H3O)3KCa(UO2)7(PO4)4O4 · 8H2O
H Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
H MetatorberniteCu(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 8H2O
H OpalSiO2 · nH2O
H MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
H AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
BeBeryllium
Be Beryl (var: Aquamarine)Be3Al2Si6O18
Be Beryl (var: Heliodor)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Be BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Be BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
BBoron
B TourmalineA(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
B SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
OOxygen
O Beryl (var: Aquamarine)Be3Al2Si6O18
O AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
O Beryl (var: Heliodor)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
O BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
O UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
O Columbite-(Fe)Fe2+Nb2O6
O TourmalineA(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
O FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
O Opal (var: Opal-AN)SiO2 · nH2O
O Limonite(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
O UraniniteUO2
O Phosphuranylite(H3O)3KCa(UO2)7(PO4)4O4 · 8H2O
O Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
O Garnet GroupX3Z2(SiO4)3
O MetatorberniteCu(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 8H2O
O ZirconZr(SiO4)
O OpalSiO2 · nH2O
O MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
O AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
O QuartzSiO2
O AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
O BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
O HematiteFe2O3
O PyrolusiteMn4+O2
FFluorine
F FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
NaSodium
Na SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Na AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
AlAluminium
Al Beryl (var: Aquamarine)Be3Al2Si6O18
Al AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
Al Beryl (var: Heliodor)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Al BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Al MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Al AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Al AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
SiSilicon
Si Beryl (var: Aquamarine)Be3Al2Si6O18
Si AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
Si Beryl (var: Heliodor)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Si BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Si UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
Si TourmalineA(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
Si Opal (var: Opal-AN)SiO2 · nH2O
Si Garnet GroupX3Z2(SiO4)3
Si ZirconZr(SiO4)
Si OpalSiO2 · nH2O
Si MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Si AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Si QuartzSiO2
Si AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
Si BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
PPhosphorus
P FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
P Phosphuranylite(H3O)3KCa(UO2)7(PO4)4O4 · 8H2O
P Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
P MetatorberniteCu(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 8H2O
KPotassium
K Phosphuranylite(H3O)3KCa(UO2)7(PO4)4O4 · 8H2O
K MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
CaCalcium
Ca UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
Ca FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
Ca Phosphuranylite(H3O)3KCa(UO2)7(PO4)4O4 · 8H2O
Ca Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
MnManganese
Mn PyrolusiteMn4+O2
FeIron
Fe AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
Fe Columbite-(Fe)Fe2+Nb2O6
Fe Limonite(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
Fe SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Fe AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Fe HematiteFe2O3
CuCopper
Cu MetatorberniteCu(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 8H2O
ZrZirconium
Zr ZirconZr(SiO4)
NbNiobium
Nb Columbite-(Fe)Fe2+Nb2O6
UUranium
U UranophaneCa(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2 · 5H2O
U UraniniteUO2
U Phosphuranylite(H3O)3KCa(UO2)7(PO4)4O4 · 8H2O
U Meta-autuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 6-8H2O
U MetatorberniteCu(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 8H2O

References

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Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Penfield, S. L. and E. S. Sperry. (1888), Mineralogica1 Notes - 1. Beryl. American Journal of Science: s. 3, 36(215): 317-320.
Clarke, F. W. (1889): Report on the Department of Minerals in the U. S. National Museum, 1888, in Congressional serial set: Issue 2669 Government Printing Office: 195.
Merrill, George P. (1922): Handbook and Descriptive Catalogue of the Collections of Gems and Precious Stones in the United States National Museum. Smithsonian Institution, United States National Museum, Bulletin 118. Washington, Government Printing Office: 13, 15.
Sterrett, Douglas B. (1923): Mica Deposits Of The United States. United States Geological Survey Bulletin 740, Government Printing Office.
Elwell, Wilbur. (1937): Some Old Localities in Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals: 12(9): 270-1.
Anonymous. (1953): Connecticut Mine May Yield Atom Ore. Special To The New York Times: August 29, 1953.
Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954): Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255.
Schooner, Richard. (1961): The Mineralogy of Connecticut. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Ryerson, Kathleen H. (1972): Rock Hounds Guide to Connecticut. Pequot Press.
Januzzi, Ronald E. (1976): Mineral Localities of Connecticut and Southeastern New York State. Taylor Associates - Mineralogical Press, Danbury.
Anonymous. (1976): Old prospector digs Connecticut mining. The Morning Record, Meriden, Connecticut, Tuesday, August 3.
O'Reilly, David. (1977): New Milford prospector - One rocky road to riches. The News-Times, Danbury, Connecticut: 94(218): 1 (Monday, August 8, 1977).
Hawes, Peter. (1984): Buried treasure. To a gem hunter, the quarry is riches. The Sunday Bridgeport Post: June 10, 1984.
Weber, Marcelle H. and Earle C. Sullivan. (1995): Connecticut Mineral Locality Index. Rocks & Minerals (Connecticut Issue): 70(6): 399.
Pawloski, John A. (2006): Connecticut Mining. Mt. Pleasant, SC: Arcadia Publishing.

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