SUPPORT US. If mindat.org is important to you, click here to donate to our Fall 2019 fundraiser!
Log InRegister
Home PageAbout MindatThe Mindat ManualHistory of MindatCopyright StatusWho We AreContact UsAdvertise on Mindat
Donate to MindatCorporate SponsorshipSponsor a PageSponsored PagesMindat AdvertisersAdvertise on Mindat
Learning CenterWhat is a mineral?The most common minerals on earthInformation for EducatorsMindat ArticlesThe ElementsBooks & Magazines
Minerals by PropertiesMinerals by ChemistryAdvanced Locality SearchRandom MineralRandom LocalitySearch by minIDLocalities Near MeSearch ArticlesSearch GlossaryMore Search Options
Search For:
Mineral Name:
Locality Name:
Keyword(s):
 
The Mindat ManualAdd a New PhotoRate PhotosLocality Edit ReportCoordinate Completion ReportAdd Glossary Item
Mining CompaniesStatisticsUsersMineral MuseumsMineral Shows & EventsThe Mindat DirectoryDevice Settings
Photo SearchPhoto GalleriesNew Photos TodayNew Photos YesterdayMembers' Photo GalleriesPast Photo of the Day GalleryMineral Photography

Galena King Mine, Coyote Canyon, Tijeras Canyon District, Bernalillo Co., New Mexico, USAi
Regional Level Types
Galena King MineMine
Coyote CanyonCanyon
Tijeras Canyon DistrictMining District
Bernalillo Co.County
New MexicoState
USACountry

This page is currently not sponsored. Click here to sponsor this page.
Key
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
34° 56' 46'' North , 106° 26' 6'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Locality type:
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Ponderosa Pine1,195 (2011)10.7km
Cedro430 (2011)11.2km
Carnuel1,232 (2011)13.2km
Tijeras541 (2011)15.6km
Manzano Springs137 (2011)18.3km


The Galena King/Octoroon/Frustration mines were mined for lead. An attempt was made in the 1940's to mine the Galena King for fluorite but I do not believe any ore was shipped.

The Galena King has two adits (lower and upper), with a connecting winze and a winze in the lower adit and a shallow shaft above the upper adit. The barite from the Octaroon mine is in thin blades while the barite from the Galena King has coarse, opaque blades that are often coated with drusy fluorite or in some case "hooded" by drusy fluorite. Barite from the Frustration mine is not noteworthy and much less common than at the Galena King or Octaroon.

Both the Galena King and the Octoroon mines are in Bernalillo Co. (as well as the Frustration mine). The Octoroon mine is about a half mile west of the Galena King and somewhat lower in elevation. The minerals at the Octaroon are virtually the same as at the Galena King (fluorite, barite, galena, quartz w/minor chalcopyrite and malachite). The barite occurs in bladed, usually white xtals and is more noteworthy than the fluorite. The fluorite is mostly in stepped octahedrons and usually a light purple to blue.

The mines were mapped in 1923 by Fayette Jones (maps held by the NM Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources). These maps show all the adits and shafts. The mineralized veins are all almost vertical and occur in pre-Cambrian granite (gneiss).
[Ray De Mark 2012]

Regions containing this locality

North America PlateTectonic Plate

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


10 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Anglesite
Formula: PbSO4
Reference: Minerals of New Mexico 3rd ed.
Baryte
Formula: BaSO4
Reference: M Massis collection
Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Reference: Michael Tanny collection
Cerussite
Formula: PbCO3
Reference: M Massis collection
Fluorite
Formula: CaF2
Reference: M Massis collection
Galena
Formula: PbS
Reference: M Massis collection
Hematite
Formula: Fe2O3
Reference: Michael Tanny collection
Malachite
Formula: Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Reference: M Massis collection
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Reference: M Massis collection
Sphalerite
Formula: ZnS
Reference: Minerals of New Mexico 3rd ed.

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Galena2.CD.10PbS
Sphalerite2.CB.05aZnS
Group 3 - Halides
Fluorite3.AB.25CaF2
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Hematite4.CB.05Fe2O3
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Calcite5.AB.05CaCO3
Cerussite5.AB.15PbCO3
Malachite5.BA.10Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
Anglesite7.AD.35PbSO4
Baryte7.AD.35BaSO4

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Galena2.8.1.1PbS
Sphalerite2.8.2.1ZnS
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
A2X3
Hematite4.3.1.2Fe2O3
Group 9 - NORMAL HALIDES
AX2
Fluorite9.2.1.1CaF2
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
Cerussite14.1.3.4PbCO3
Group 16a - ANHYDROUS CARBONATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
Malachite16a.3.1.1Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Group 28 - ANHYDROUS ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4
Anglesite28.3.1.3PbSO4
Baryte28.3.1.1BaSO4
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
CCarbon
C CerussitePbCO3
C MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
C CalciteCaCO3
OOxygen
O CerussitePbCO3
O BaryteBaSO4
O QuartzSiO2
O MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
O HematiteFe2O3
O AnglesitePbSO4
O CalciteCaCO3
FFluorine
F FluoriteCaF2
SiSilicon
Si QuartzSiO2
SSulfur
S GalenaPbS
S BaryteBaSO4
S AnglesitePbSO4
S SphaleriteZnS
CaCalcium
Ca FluoriteCaF2
Ca CalciteCaCO3
FeIron
Fe HematiteFe2O3
CuCopper
Cu MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
ZnZinc
Zn SphaleriteZnS
BaBarium
Ba BaryteBaSO4
PbLead
Pb GalenaPbS
Pb CerussitePbCO3
Pb AnglesitePbSO4

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Minerals of New Mexico 3rd ed.


This page contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.
 
Mineral and/or Locality  
Mindat.org is an outreach project of the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization. Public Relations by Blytheweigh.
Copyright © mindat.org and the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy 1993-2019, except where stated. Most political location boundaries are © OpenStreetMap contributors. Mindat.org relies on the contributions of thousands of members and supporters.
Privacy Policy - Terms & Conditions - Contact Us Current server date and time: September 17, 2019 17:41:44 Page generated: June 27, 2019 16:23:45
Go to top of page