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Quartz locality, Moosup, Plainfield, Windham Co., Connecticut, USAi
Regional Level Types
Quartz locality- not defined -
Moosup- not defined -
Plainfield- not defined -
Windham Co.County
ConnecticutState
USACountry

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Key
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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 41° 43' 4'' North , 71° 51' 34'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 41.71778,-71.85944
GeoHash:G#: drkvkf3x9
Köppen climate type:Cfb : Temperate oceanic climate
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Moosup3,231 (2017)1.9km
Wauregan1,205 (2017)5.1km
Plainfield15,498 (2017)6.5km
Plainfield Village2,557 (2017)7.1km
East Brooklyn1,638 (2017)9.3km


Quartz crystals formed in cavities in brecciated Plainville Formation quartzite. Brecciation was caused by the Snake Meadow Brook Fault, related to the Lantern Hill Fault, which was silicified 238 Ma (Middle Triassic) (Altamura, 1995).

The main exposures occur along the former railroad bed (Coventry Greenway) extending northeast from Brunswick Avenue, parallel to the east side of the Moosup River and south of State Route 14. The site is a railroad cut, not a "quarry" (Robinson and King, 1989), nor is it correctly called "Diamond Ledge", which refers to a similar quartz occurrence in West Stafford, Connecticut. Discovered in the early 1980s, after much of the slope was dug, private property encroached upon, and spoil dumped in the pathway, the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection covered and shored up the exposure and as of 2010 there is very little left to collect.

Reportedly abuse of this state locale (and adjacent private property) led to the permit system now required for any collection on state land, which is limited to only 3 places - not including this one.

Regions containing this locality

North America PlateTectonic Plate

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


4 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Albite
Formula: Na(AlSi3O8)
Habit: tabular
Colour: white
Description: Small crystals in a vein cross-cutting gray quartzite, with quartz and hematite.
Reference: Harold Moritz collection
Goethite
Formula: α-Fe3+O(OH)
Colour: dark brown to yellow
Description: Massive to earthy to crudely columnar in structure, formed within brecciated pockets long after the quartz crystallized.
Reference: Ed Force collection
Hematite
Formula: Fe2O3
Habit: tabular
Colour: black metallic
Description: Small crystals in a vein cross-cutting gray quartzite, with quartz and albite.
Reference: Harold Moritz collection
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Habit: short to elongated prisms, scepter overgrowths
Colour: colorless to milky, pale purple
Description: Voids of all sizes host subparallel, prismatic quartz on the walls, which grew from grains in the brecciated quartzite. Crystals can be colorless and clear or milky with parasitic "corn-cob" crystals. Scepter overgrowths, some amethystine, also occur. Crystals can reach 8 cm.
Reference: Clark, Bill. (2001). Connecticut Quartz: Interesting Specimens from a former Collecting Site. Rock & Gem: 31(8).
Quartz var: Amethyst
Formula: SiO2
Habit: short to complex scepter overgrowths on prismatic quartz
Colour: light purple, zoned
Description: As scepter overgrowths on other quartz.
Reference: Clark, Bill. (2001). Connecticut Quartz: Interesting Specimens from a former Collecting Site. Rock & Gem: 31(8).
Quartz var: Milky Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Habit: short to elongated prisms, scepter overgrowths
Colour: milky white
Description: Voids of all sizes host subparallel, prismatic quartz on the walls, which grew from grains in the brecciated quartzite. Crystals can be colorless and clear or milky with parasitic "corn-cob" crystals. Scepter overgrowths also occur. Crystals can reach 8 cm.
Reference: Clark, Bill. (2001). Connecticut Quartz: Interesting Specimens from a former Collecting Site. Rock & Gem: 31(8).

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Goethite4.00.α-Fe3+O(OH)
Hematite4.CB.05Fe2O3
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
var: Amethyst4.DA.05SiO2
var: Milky Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Group 9 - Silicates
Albite9.FA.35Na(AlSi3O8)

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
A2X3
Hematite4.3.1.2Fe2O3
Group 6 - HYDROXIDES AND OXIDES CONTAINING HYDROXYL
XO(OH)
Goethite6.1.1.2α-Fe3+O(OH)
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Group 76 - TECTOSILICATES Al-Si Framework
Al-Si Framework with Al-Si frameworks
Albite76.1.3.1Na(AlSi3O8)
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
Quartz
var: Amethyst
-SiO2
var: Milky Quartz-SiO2

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
OOxygen
O QuartzSiO2
O Quartz (var: Milky Quartz)SiO2
O Quartz (var: Amethyst)SiO2
O AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
O HematiteFe2O3
O Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
NaSodium
Na AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
AlAluminium
Al AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
SiSilicon
Si QuartzSiO2
Si Quartz (var: Milky Quartz)SiO2
Si Quartz (var: Amethyst)SiO2
Si AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
FeIron
Fe HematiteFe2O3
Fe Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Neoproterozoic
541 - 1000 Ma



ID: 2933382
Plainfield Formation

Age: Neoproterozoic (541 - 1000 Ma)

Stratigraphic Name: Plainfield Formation

Description: Interlayered light-gray, thin-bedded quartzite, in places with feldspar, mica, graphite, or pyrite, light- to medium-gray gneiss composed of quartz, oligoclase, and biotite (rarely microcline), medium- to dark-gray schist composed of quartz, oligoclase, biotite, sillimanite, and garnet, dark-gray or green gneiss composed of plagioclase, quartz, biotite, and hornblende (commonly with diopside), amphibolite, diopsite-bearing quartzite, and calc-silicate rock. In places contains quartz-sillimanite nodules.

Comments: Part of Eastern Uplands; Avalonian (Continental) Terrane; Avalonian Anticlinorium Original map source: Connecticut Geological and Natural History Survey, DEP, in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey, 2000, Bedrock Geology of Connecticut, shapefile, scale 1:50,000

Lithology: Major:{quartzite}, Minor:{gneiss,schist}, Incidental:{amphibolite, calc silicate rock}

Reference: Horton, J.D., C.A. San Juan, and D.B. Stoeser. The State Geologic Map Compilation (SGMC) geodatabase of the conterminous United States. doi: 10.3133/ds1052. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1052. [133]

Neoproterozoic
541 - 1000 Ma



ID: 3186948
Neoproterozoic crystalline metamorphic rocks

Age: Neoproterozoic (541 - 1000 Ma)

Lithology: Orthogneiss/paragneiss/metavolcanic gneiss

Reference: Chorlton, L.B. Generalized geology of the world: bedrock domains and major faults in GIS format: a small-scale world geology map with an extended geological attribute database. doi: 10.4095/223767. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 5529. [154]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Robinson, George and Vandall T. King. (1989). What's New in Minerals? Sixteenth Annual Rochester Academy of Science Mineralogical Symposium. Mineralogical Record: 20(5):390.
Altamura, Robert J. (1995), Tectonics, Wall-Rock Alteration and Emplacement History of the Lantern Hill Giant Quartz Lode, Avalonian Terrane, Southeastern Connecticut. Trip E in Guidebook for Fieldtrips in Eastern Connecticut and the Hartford Basin. Northeast Section Geological Society of America 30th Annual Meeting. Department of Environmental Protection Guidebook number 7.
Clark, Bill. (2001). Connecticut Quartz: Interesting Specimens from a former Collecting Site. Rock & Gem: 31(8).


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