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GS1

Posted by Bruce Wayne Osborne  
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Bruce Wayne Osborne December 23, 2010 12:42AM
What is the status of GS1 of the Tsumeb Mine, Namibia ?
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Marco E. Ciriotti December 24, 2010 11:23AM
Most probably the GS1 from Tsumeb mine is an amorphous Zn, Fe arsenate.
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Walter Veldsman March 25, 2016 09:39AM
Marco E. Ciriotti Wrote:
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> Most probably the GS1 from Tsumeb mine is an
> amorphous Zn, Fe arsenate.
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Walter Veldsman March 25, 2016 09:42AM
Marco E. Ciriotti Wrote:
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> Most probably the GS1 from Tsumeb mine is an
> amorphous Zn, Fe arsenate.


Any update on status of GS1? To 2016 is it just amorphous and not a rock and left as that?
Walter
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Alfredo Petrov March 25, 2016 10:39AM
Walter, GS1 needs a mineralogist who wants to work on it, and few mineralogists enjoy working on not-well-crystallized substances. Working on amorphous stuff is difficult, and one has to prove a negative (never easy), namely prove that it is not a mixture. That's why so many potential minerals remain decades in limbo - It's not that they are "not minerals", it's that no one got excited about doing the work.
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Paul De Bondt March 25, 2016 11:51AM
Some dealers list them as koritnigite and others as fahleite.
But everybody knows they have sometimes much imagination.
GS1 is for the moment the only official name, sorry.

Cheers.

Paul.
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Tony Nikischer March 25, 2016 03:36PM
In June of 1997, I ran EDS on several samples of GS1 in my lab, finding it to be a Zn-Ca-Fe arsenate. A sample was sent to Andy Roberts at the Geological Survey of Canada for XRD work. Running overnight in a DeBye-Scherer camera with subsequent indexing by Andy pointed to fahleite, and the film is probably still on file there under its ID number of X-77877. That is not to say more work isn't needed, or that all samples of GS-1 are fahleite, but some of it certainly is, based on chemistry and XRD work.
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Uwe Kolitsch March 26, 2016 08:19PM
Added.

Are there any other GS minerals missing? We have now GS1, GS5, GS17 on Mindat.
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Łukasz Kruszewski May 06, 2016 02:35PM
The phase is not present in the Valid Unnamed Minerals list.
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