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The Nature Thread

Posted by David Bernstein  
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David Bernstein July 08, 2011 12:59PM
Part of the fun of exploring the old sites that I'm obsessed with is finding non-mineral related things of interest. Whether it be snakes, wildflowers, frogs, fungi or birds, everything interests me. So I thought it would be fun to share some of the pictures of flora,fauna etc. that we encounter in our daily or weekend travels.

I'll start with two mushrooms that I encountered during a rough hike to an old mining site in Oxford, New Jersey yesterday. Bonus points if you can identify the species. Oh, and if your story has an unhappy ending, like, the snake rushed me and I beat it to death with a crowbar, please leave that out.:D Just thinking of prior threads.





Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 07/06/2013 05:17PM by Debbie Woolf.
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Peter Andresen July 08, 2011 01:56PM
Great topic David!

You are so right, part of the fun going out collecting at new sites is the surprices you may encounter. I add a rather old picture, from a trip to Persberg area, where I found this orchid growing next to an old iron mine, I don't know which mine, but it wasn't the one I was looking for - Harstigen...

Platanthera chlorantha

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Tom Bennett July 08, 2011 03:06PM
When ever we are out we always look for birds. We have bald Eagles near us and love watching them. We saw a Great Horned Owl in the spring.
Our little group of rock hunters have a strong respect for old stuff - like that smokestack at the Golf course, David !
Great pic ! I have long thought about doing a pic filled tread about that spot.
Old buildings old train tracks old relics are always a plus.
Bugs dont bother me and I'm pretty much invulnerable to poison ivy - the only part of " Nature " that gets me is the heat.
-Tom
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Harald Schillhammer July 08, 2011 03:20PM
David, your shrooms look very much like Amanita rubescens (an edible fly agaric).

Funny, when I go out collecting minerals in spring I always keep my eyes open for potentially good mushroom places to be re-visited in summer and fall :).

Peter, nice orchid!

Here's one of my best catches from Dunkelstein forest: Boletus pinophilus; cap diameter 15cm and in perfect condition.

http://www.pbase.com/rovebeetle/image/117821873/original.jpg

Cheers

Harry
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David Bernstein July 08, 2011 03:24PM
Beautiful picture, Peter! Long ago, when I grew Orchids I could probably have told you what species that was-it looks very familiar. No longer.

Here is a nice shroom that looks like a flounder.





Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/06/2013 05:17PM by Debbie Woolf.
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David Bernstein July 08, 2011 03:27PM
Harold, that is an amazing shot. It almost looks like an extension of the rock, that is it looks like the shroom is made of rock. Keep em comin'.(:D
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Roger Curry July 08, 2011 03:52PM
2006 Dunolly, Victoria. Gold detecting failure & resident of woodpile next to tent. A dusty Redback with two egg sacks.

Redback about to climb on lens.

Not my nugget.
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Michael Wood July 08, 2011 04:01PM
David, that first 'shroom photo looks like Panther Cap (amanita pantherina).

Here's a critter I stumbled upon a few years ago, at Talisker Bay on the Isle of Skye, Scotland. I came round a boulder and there it was, no more than 12 FEET away (4m). I thought it was injured at first, as it was writhing about on the rocks; but it was merely drying it's fur after a dip in the sea! It then lay back and sunbathed and I kept on taking photo's until my battery died. Then I snuck away and left it to it. It made my day.

Cheers, Mike





Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/06/2013 05:18PM by Debbie Woolf.
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John Truax July 08, 2011 04:39PM
That is a beautiful Boletus Harald, shroom collecting is as exciting as rock collecting for me!

Morels~!





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Harald Schillhammer July 08, 2011 04:43PM
Michael Wood Wrote:
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> David, that first 'shroom photo looks like Panther
> Cap (amanita pantherina).
> Cheers, Mike

Mike, I am not so sure footed with N-American Amanita species - there are considerably more than in Europe - but that reddish tint on the cap is usually a good token for the Blusher (A. rubescens), Panthers almost always are conspicuously and uniformly brownish between the white velum remains even when young.
Funny thing is, here in Europe we have more edible Amanita species than poisonous ones, but one would be wise to only take them home and eat them when he is a mushroom expert :).

BTW - also nice catch of yours.

Cheers

Harry
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Harald Schillhammer July 08, 2011 04:44PM
Wow, John! I am still waiting for the day I find morels.

Cheers

Harry
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Harald Schillhammer July 08, 2011 04:46PM
David Bernstein Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Harold, that is an amazing shot. It almost looks
> like an extension of the rock, that is it looks
> like the shroom is made of rock. Keep em
> comin'.(:D

Thanks David. Here's more:
mushrooms

Harry
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Paul Brandes July 08, 2011 06:43PM
Michael,
Are you sure that critter was "only" sunbathing, or sleeping off a wee bit too much Talisker Scotch?? :)o

John,
As I'm sure you know, there is nothing finer than fresh morels sauteed in butter and garlic, then placed beside a nice steak; mmmmmmm!!!
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Aleš Tomek July 08, 2011 06:46PM
Pretty mushrooms!!

Those pictures are one of the reasons why is it good to self-collect. Last year I took a photo of this nice and big caterpillar (Deilephila elpenor, Linné 1758) crawling in the site in Valeč (famous opal-AN, hyalite site). The measure is my kids hammer...

regards,
Aleš.



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Harald Schillhammer July 08, 2011 06:52PM
Aleš Tomek Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Last year I took a photo of
> this nice and big caterpillar (Deilephila elpenor,
> Linné 1758) crawling in the site in Valeč
> (famous opal-AN, hyalite site). The measure is my
> kids hammer...
>
> regards,
> Aleš.

Aleš, what a beauty. I have found the moth but never the larva. Hawkmoth caterpillars can be quite spectacular, and yours is actually one of the "smaller" species :).

Cheers

Harry
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David Bernstein July 08, 2011 06:52PM
Unfortunately, I never developed a taste for mushrooms, only the big hunk of rare beef that comes with it.

Cool picture, Mike. Would love to have scratched his belly.
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Harald Schillhammer July 08, 2011 06:54PM
Paul Brandes Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> John,
> As I'm sure you know, there is nothing finer than
> fresh morels sauteed in butter and garlic, then
> placed beside a nice steak; mmmmmmm!!!

Mercy!!!

Harry
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Rowan Lytle July 08, 2011 07:07PM
digging in one pegmatite in CT I found a 7in spotted salamander under a boulder. I put the boulder back, let the salamander crawl under it, and moved to a different spot.
-Rowan
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Paul De Bondt July 08, 2011 07:32PM
Hi all,

Very interesting topic.
To be honest, when I go collecting, I always look for other things than minerals first because they can be found and observed without digging. Just look around before puting your nose into the ground. You will be amazed.

I was in Cornwall in May and found this very big firefly female ( Lampyris Noctiluca ) on the road.
Never saw a big one like this. I have some in my garden but are only the third of this giant.
My wife's hand for scale. Kenidjack valley.

I am fond on mushrooms and mostly the wild ones. I find often some but never dared to eat them.
I am looking for a natural guide who can help me identifying them.
Morels with butter and garlic are divine>:D<

Take care and best regards.

Paul.
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George Creighton July 08, 2011 07:35PM


This is a great thread.

On my way to explore the Koksnes prospect grimstad norway got distracted by the insect life in a wild ( vivendel ) honeysuckle bush that grow in the coastal regions here.

Took this image of a fly and many others, needless to say I never got to see the prospect, maybe this year.

Regards george

PS, camera canon powershot G11
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Paul De Bondt July 08, 2011 07:35PM
Oops, forgot the pic.

Zenjoy.



Paul
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David Bernstein July 08, 2011 08:15PM
Seeing the insects reminded me of a moment at a mine in New York State. I was done exploring and came face to face with what looked like a dragonfly. I think dragonflies are amazing creatures and since we were face to face, I held out my hand to see if she would perch. It continued to hover in front of me. So, I stepped aside. It was then that I realized that I had extended an invitation to a solitary thread waisted wasp who was trying to retrieve prey that I was nearly standing on. As soon as I moved, she landed on the insect and dragged it down a burrow, presumably to lay an egg on it..
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A Mathauser July 08, 2011 08:16PM
Found this little guy in our backyard, it froze completely in this position, when we put it down it played dead for about 2 minutes - and then got up and just walked away.





Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/06/2013 05:18PM by Debbie Woolf.
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Stephanie Martin July 08, 2011 08:54PM
David, wonderful idea for a thread, proving to be very popular.

An now for a revisit with this vivid Carpathian Blue Slug:

http://www.mindat.org/photo-385443.html

(from previous thread: http://www.mindat.org/forum.php?read,7,223137,223167#msg-223167)
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Joseph Polityka July 08, 2011 09:33PM
David,

Great thread; fascinating.

John, nice mushrooms. What type of trees are in the area? Here in Pennsylvania they grow around ash, tulip and sycamore trees.

Best,

Joe
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David Bernstein July 08, 2011 09:51PM
Thanks, folks. I knew there were a lot of like minded souls here.

Stephanie, I have that slug in my favorites and look at it often. My son and I just saw a large slug outside climbing up our stone wall. Pretty drab looking slug compared to Big Blue.
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Dr. Paul Bordovsky July 09, 2011 12:24AM
Ran across this on the trail in the Organ Mountains, New Mexico. He kept trying to hide in the shadow of the boot.

http://diente.smugmug.com/Nature/Organ-Mountains-and-Hayner/i-Sj4XhkH/0/X2/P7035742xxa-X2.jpg
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David Bernstein July 09, 2011 12:52AM
Hope there was no Tarantula Hawk around. Never seen one but I hear they are pretty ferocious.
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Corie Mattar July 09, 2011 01:37AM
Hey, Paul. I think I met his cousin in Warner Springs California!



At least he didn't rush us... >:D<

Corie
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Dr. Paul Bordovsky July 09, 2011 01:52AM
David, never seen the Tarantula hawk, but how about a caracara.......taken late afternoon at our family ranch.

http://diente.smugmug.com/Nature/Ranch-Photos-11252010/PB269907xxa/1133064060_FUZof-M.jpg

Corie, that must be the leggy cousin that left for fame and fortune in Cali.
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Jake Harper July 09, 2011 02:23AM
Wow...everyone's photos are just awesome!
My treasure of the day in Southern Idaho, a tame juvenile Pituophis catenifer (Gopher Snake).



Jake

All knowledge is vain, except where there be work
All work is empty except where there be love



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/06/2013 05:19PM by Debbie Woolf.
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David Sheumack July 09, 2011 02:26AM
John, Those morels make my mouth water. For those of us that are mad enough to go wandering along sandstone ridges on moonless nights in Autumn/Winter west of Sydney, you may be lucky enough to encounter one of these beauties to brighten your path. Pleurotus nidiformis, about 20 cm diameter and when fresh, they are bright enough to read a book by. Photo was taken as a 150 second exposure.





Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/06/2013 05:19PM by Debbie Woolf.
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Stephen Rose July 09, 2011 02:56AM
Great thread!

Here are a couple of shots of a tarantula hawk on a sage in our garden. It is about 4-5 cm long. They are not aggressive but are reported to have a stunning sting. Love the 'wulfenite' wings.



Photos by Rosegraphics.

Steve
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Douglas Merson July 09, 2011 04:04AM
Here is a columbine found at the Van Silver Property (Van Silver Mine; Van Silver Claims), Brandywine Creek, Vancouver Mining Division, British Columbia, Canada in June 2006.





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Darren Court July 09, 2011 04:33AM
Regarding Tarantula Hawks - we have had a ridiculous number of them at the White Sands Missile Range Museum this year - up to about 80 or so on the patio at a time. A co-worker was stung a few days ago and said it was the worst sting she has ever had! Obviously we try to stay away from them!!!

Darren
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David Bernstein July 09, 2011 09:41AM
Stephen, great shot of the Taratula Hawk. If you google painful stings on the Internet, there is an article who subjected himself to stings from various creatures, including the Cow Killer(Velvet Ant), Bullet Ant, various wasps etc. And ranked the pain on a scale he created. I'm not exactly sure why someone would want to subject themselves to that.

Doug, that Columbine shot is gorgeous. There are two mines that I visit to see them along with Ladyslippers but I have never gotten a decent shot.

Paul, the Caracara is not yet on my life list. Amazing shot. Do you have Swallow Tailed Kites also?

David, if you have a moment, could you explain a little more about that seemingly phosphorescent plant. Never seen anything like that!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/09/2011 09:58AM by David Bernstein.
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Greg Dainty July 09, 2011 10:35AM
This bush turkey has been coming in for a feed for the last 5 years. He turns up about a dozen times a year , and can be hand feed......Greg

http://www.varockhounder.com/uploads/2011070903291181.jpg
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Maggie Wilson July 09, 2011 10:41AM
Awesome thread! Thanks David, and all contributors!
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David Bernstein July 09, 2011 11:34AM
Nice Turkey, Greg!

Here are two favorite backyard shots of mine. The first are two Turkey Vultures warming their wings in the morning sun and the next is an adult Red Shouldered Hawk who wintered with us one year. I would throw him/her chicken or turkey parts every morning.





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Michael Wood July 09, 2011 01:44PM
Another time I was on the Isle of Skye I saw for the first time one of these things - a basking shark - must have been 20 - 25 feet long (~7m). It was just floating along in the calm sea with it's gob open, which can't be a bad way of life. I took the photo from the cliff top which was around 600' high at that point (~180m) so its a bit fuzzy - only 3x zoom on this, my old camera.

George - excellent fly on honeysuckle photo - looks very professional.



Regards, Mike



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/06/2013 05:20PM by Debbie Woolf.
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Michael Wood July 09, 2011 01:54PM
Also on this trip to Skye in June 2008 I snapped these burnet moths (?) hanging around on the upper part of the climb out of Sgurr nam Boc.



Mike



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/06/2013 05:20PM by Debbie Woolf.
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Dr. Paul Bordovsky July 09, 2011 02:25PM
Hi, David.

No kite pics......I just get the random bird shot when I'm out and about. How about these BIF shots.

http://diente.smugmug.com/Nature/Colorado-Bend-State-Park-2/i-LS7NNK3/0/M/P4104327xxs-M.jpg

http://diente.smugmug.com/Nature/Colorado-Bend-State-Park-2/i-T8Jkzm5/0/M/P4104329xxa-M.jpg

I was lucky to get his feathers backlit, when he was slowing to land on the tree.

Paul
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Uwe Ludwig July 09, 2011 02:54PM
Two years ago when I visited the famous Epidot-location Knappenwand/Austria I found some nice lilies (Lilium martagon) and I made some pictures. One year later this spot was cancelled by a big landslip of some million tons of rocks.



Uwe



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Douglas Merson July 09, 2011 03:18PM
1. a trillium that is in our backyard
2. ladybug in our garden
3. wild bleeding heart in our yard





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Stephen Rose July 09, 2011 03:33PM
Another take on the tarantula hawk for those who might want to see it take down a tarantula. This link is to a Squidoo site Rosegraphics (my wife Teri) put together a couple of years ago:

http://www.squidoo.com/t_hawks

David, I'm with you. I can't imagine anyone letting one of these critters sting on purpose. I pretty much stop at watching a mosquito fill up. :o

Steve
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Donald Slater July 09, 2011 03:42PM
Great shots everyone. Nature's beauty whether in a mineral, bird, bug, or plant is amazing but stop talking about steak and mushrooms my stomach is growling and it is a long way to supper.
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Paul De Bondt July 09, 2011 03:45PM
Hi all,

Fantastic topic, I love it.
Gorgeous pics everybody, keep them coming.

In junuari 2009 it has frozen during the night. The day before it was quite warm but very misty.
This is what I discovered the next morning. A plant with a " mineral " growing on it.

A Chimonanthus Preacox knob, ready to pop open with ice crystal growing on them.
Just a few minutes to take the pic and everything was gone, how it came.

Zenjoy.



Take care and best regards.

Paul.
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John Stolz July 09, 2011 03:55PM
What a lot of interesting information and beautiful photography--thanks everyone!
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Stephanie Martin July 09, 2011 04:04PM
Hi All, Great photos and fun!

My husband has been away for a week caring for his ailing father, so there has been not much need to use the BBQ. A couple of weeks ago we had to remove a pesky wasp/hornet nest taking hold in the lid, not uncommon as they seem to be attracted to the smell of fat cooking (try french fries in august at a picnic, you will be swarmed!). Today my husband decided to start early to do some slow cook beef ribs (with Morels, sorry Donald). He was taken aback when he opened the lid. We've never seen anything like this on the BBQ! Obviously it is some type of small mammal, probably a rodent, like a chipmunk, that we have running around here. There is an aweful lot of moss and grassy stuff, with a deep impression in the centre. It only took a week or less to build! Anyone know what type of nest please let me know. Sorry the resolution is not that great after resizing the photo to post.





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Michael Shaw July 09, 2011 04:13PM
This fellow is content to rest motionless among some plants on our deck during the day, but every night he visits the window next to my favorite chair where he eagerly devours insects on the glass.



Mike
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Douglas Merson July 09, 2011 04:14PM
A crab spider with lunch





Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/06/2013 05:13PM by Debbie Woolf.
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Dr. Paul Bordovsky July 09, 2011 05:25PM
This is a nice thread with great pics by everyone.

Douglas, I really like the trillium.

Paul, a timely capture of the ice crystals....very cool.....

Michael, love the colors in the congregation of the burnet moths.

A couple more. First, web construction.

http://diente.smugmug.com/Nature/Ranch-Photos-12222007/PC215430spidercrop/235373998_48ews-L.jpg

Next, a backside view of a backlit thistle.

http://diente.smugmug.com/Nature/Easter-Weekend-Wildflowers-2/P4035930b/838014606_kUT6Y-L.jpg


Paul
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Rob (The Rock Hunter) Shepard July 09, 2011 05:47PM
Pretty pics



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/15/2011 12:53PM by Rock Hunter.
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Steve Stuart July 09, 2011 06:27PM
Found this in my back yard while mowing the lawn today. Neither I or my wife know what it is. Any ideas?



Steve
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Greg Peterson July 09, 2011 06:51PM
Some sort of onion or camas (be careful, camas is very poisonous). Not certain, but looks similiar.
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Matthew Kimball July 09, 2011 07:49PM
Here are a few pictures of a garden snail found in our back yard. They weren't taken during mineral collecting, but they are very cool!B)



-Matthew



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Ray Hill July 09, 2011 08:30PM
Here is part of a stem of unopened lupen buds that we saw on a trail walk we went on last week in B.C. Canada.





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Stephen Rose July 09, 2011 08:41PM
I took this photo at a barite mine in Elko County, Nevada, in 1984. The plover (killdeer) did the usual broken-wing-follow me dance as I approached and, even knowing where she started, it took me several minutes to find this nest. Every stone in the photo is massive barite. She has moved a significant mass to construct the shallow depression for her eggs.

As I recall, the eggs are about 3.5 cm long.



Cheers!

Steve
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Joe Mulvey July 09, 2011 09:24PM
Each March Bob Whittmore opens the gates to the Palermo #1 Mine in North Groton, NH to allow people to visit the mine to see the ice crystals. If the water is low enough one could venture a ways into the mine and, with the aid of a flashlight, find a hibernating bat or four.

Bats at Palermo #1

It's always nice to see winter pix in July!
Joe
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David Bernstein July 09, 2011 10:16PM
Douglas, that Trillium is beautiful. My Dad has quite a collection of them, caged from the deer. He has managed to grow varieties with yellow and red blooms also. It is one of my favorite types of wildflower.
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Dennis Tryon July 09, 2011 10:25PM
John Truax,

Dip those morels in egg yolk, roll in flour, and fry in butter. Brings back memories for me of growing up in Indiana with a dad who was really into mushroom hunting. Enjoy.

Envious I am,

Dennis



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/09/2011 10:36PM by Dennis Tryon.
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Edgars Endzelins July 09, 2011 11:09PM
Took this photo in Latvia. This is perhaps Mesocerus marginatus. I dont know for sure because this creature was hiding from me >:D<
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Colleen Thomson July 09, 2011 11:25PM
Fantastic thread! wonderful photos and stories from everyone!

I came across this little tortoise crashing through the long grass in Bulgaria a few years ago - he was going faster up the slope than I was!::o



cheers, Colleen



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Maggie Wilson July 10, 2011 12:27AM
Here's one for David and his dad - from the Rare Nature Preserve on Blair Road in Cambridge, Ontario

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David Bernstein July 10, 2011 01:06AM
Wonderful shot, Maggie. Thanks!
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Clifford Trebilcock July 10, 2011 02:31AM
Enjoying this thread.Some great photos so far. I often take my camera along to catch photos of wildlife,plants,birds etc on collecting trips. Always looking for interesting things to photograph besides minerals. Here is a photo of a very large laetiporus sulphureus,sulphur polypore,sometimes called "Chicken of the Woods". I found this on a collecting trip near the Consolidated #1 Quarry in Topsham,Maine measured nearly 2 feet across. Very good edible mushroom,fried with butter "Tastes like Chicken" as the saying goes.

Cliff



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Daniel Levesque July 10, 2011 02:56AM
My wife, Karla, who rarely accompanies me on my digs took these two nature photos. One of a toad at the Turner Quarry at Mt. Apatite and the other of a gopher in his hole at the Maine Feldspar mine. (or should I say, her favorite gopher,me.)





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Robert Meyer July 10, 2011 03:12AM
An excellent thread. Most mineral collectors are fascinated by the flora and fauna that we encounter in our travels. Some of us are experts in the identity of the natural things we encounter outside. Many excellent photographs here. I especially like Doug's Trillium and Crab Spider!


This is a Sheep Moth on Paint Brush encountered near the Keystone Mine, near Coquihalla Pass, BC, Canada



A Columbine from the Silica Bell Claim, near Chilliwack, B.C., Canada



Pine Drops (a saprophyte) from near Washington Pass, Okanogan Co., Washington, USA

Bob Meyer
open | download - Sheep Moth-small.jpg (648.1 KB)
open | download - Columbine Silica Bell.jpg (569.4 KB)
open | download - Pine Drops-WPsmall.jpg (284 KB)
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Robert Meyer July 10, 2011 03:20AM
Some fungus:


Morels found near the Black Pine Mine, near Philipsburg, Montana, USA


The rest of the "Harvest."


Gelatinous fungi on wood in my backyard.

Bob



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/10/2011 03:21AM by Robert Meyer.
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open | download - Jelly Fungus small.jpg (143.4 KB)
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John Stolz July 10, 2011 07:03AM
Here's a family of bears that visited our man camp in the Canadian Rockies, We were driving tunnels for BC Rail. I took lots of pictures, but I wasn't very good.
open | download - 1982 Bear.5.jpg (974.9 KB)
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David Bernstein July 10, 2011 10:16AM
Thought I would add a picture of an unknown (to me) fungus I recently encountered. I love the colors.





Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/06/2013 05:14PM by Debbie Woolf.
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Steve Sorrell July 10, 2011 11:14AM
We're in the middle of winter here. In fact it's been snowing today. Scarlet Robins are a welcome neighbour at this time of year. This one seems to enjoy being a tightrope walker...



Regards
Steve



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/06/2013 05:14PM by Debbie Woolf.
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Clifford Trebilcock July 10, 2011 12:20PM
Hi David,

Think the mushroom in your photo is Hemlock varnish shelf mushroom, Ganodermus tsugae, non edible. Usually found on hemlock or conifers.

Cliff
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Michael Otto July 10, 2011 03:53PM
This topic will cause me to keep my camera with me on my collecting trips more often, as I have missed some good opportunities. However here is one pic of a whale that surfaced right next to our boat on a tuna trip 80 miles out in the Atlantic. The other photo is of an invader (tomato horned worm) in my garden last year. The little cocoons on his back contain little preditary wasps that kill the worms.





Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/06/2013 05:14PM by Debbie Woolf.
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Paul De Bondt July 10, 2011 08:31PM
Hi all,

Thank you Paul B that you enjoy the pic.

Here are some others from the same Kenidjack Valley that I took the same day.
The first is from a bunch of purple Irisses and the second, only a few feet apart, a Fazant hen ( yummy )



Zenjoy.

Take care and best regards.

Paul.
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Maggie Wilson July 10, 2011 09:34PM
This is a repeat of a Facebook post - I was on the way to the compost pile and just about tromped on this fellow - I placed him on this branch and he/she/it obliged the photographer. Too bad I wasn't able to get a shot of it's thorax/abdomen - it was the same brilliant iridescent blue. Reiner, the butterfly and moth expert, says it's a milkweed moth.


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Robert Meyer July 11, 2011 02:28AM
Nice moth, Maggie. Moths have those feathery antennae. They're pretty cool.

Here are a few from a trip last July to Idaho and Montana:


A Mariposa Lily from the Bayhorse District, Custer Co., Idaho, USA




A Rocky Mountain Iris, Iris Missouriensis, from the Quartz Hill District, Beaverhead Co., Montana



"Strange Creature-Flora or Fauna ?" from the Algonquin Mine, near Philipsburg, Granite Co., Montana, USA

Bob
open | download - 2010-07-25-05-Bayhorse.jpg (677.5 KB)
open | download - 2010-07-27-04-Quartz Hill.jpg (940.5 KB)
open | download - 2010-07-28-11-Algonquin-small.jpg (711.9 KB)
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David Bernstein July 11, 2011 12:48PM
Clifford, thanks for identifying. The picture was in fact taken in a grove of conifers.

Here is a feel good story I posted on Facebook. Involves the backyard and not an expedition but my friend deserves to be seen by a wider audience.

Two years ago, Baby as we call her, lost her mother to a car crash. She began hanging out in our backyard and following me around at a safe distance. Ultimately, I began to feed her whole wheat bread. She grew and was "adopted" by one of the other does. She now has fawns of her own but she still stops by for a snack and to relax in our yard.





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Ken Ceglady July 11, 2011 07:35PM
Great thread.
How about this colorless jelly fungus?





Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/06/2013 05:14PM by Debbie Woolf.
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Ken Ceglady July 11, 2011 07:51PM
How about these?
As those of you familiar with the American South know, cypress (Taxodium spp.) trees grow to enormous proportions. In areas where they are more or less constantly shallowly inundated (which is where they usually grow), they develop characteristic "knees", and the lower trunks develop moderate buttresses.
However, where the water level is highly variable (very deep to dry), they do some weird things...... Like these - no knees, and extremely swollen bases. These are in a creekbed, but you'd never know during the dry season.





Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/06/2013 05:14PM by Debbie Woolf.
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