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Help with Japanese mineral labels

Posted by Steve Stuart  
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Steve Stuart October 12, 2018 04:16AM
My wife and I attended the Kyoto Mineral Show on October 8th while on our two-week escapade in Japan. I bought some small specimens with micro potential, and a nice Japan law quartz twin. Labels are written in Japanese. Can anyone help with the locality ID on English? Thanks!





Also, I bought a specimen labeled in English as allanite from Kitashirakawa, Kyoto City, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan. That exact string is not in Mindat. Might it be called something else in Mindat?
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Aaron Verrill October 12, 2018 04:55AM
Hi Steve. Really enjoyed running into you at the Kyoto show! Your passion for micromounts is quite infectious! You've got me reexamining all my mineral specimens looking for micromounting material.

I'm working now, but tonight I'll sit down and translate those labels for you.

Regards,

Aaron
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Hiro Inukai October 12, 2018 06:40AM
For the first two images (with the round boxes), the katakana to the right of the English name is the transliteration into Japanese syllables (i.e., a Japanese person not fluent in English would read those characters and obtain a rough translation of the sound of the mineral as pronounced in English). The kanji at the bottom of the label is the locality.

For the xenotime specimen, the locality is "Takehara mine, Misugi-machi, Tsu city, Mie prefecture."

For the gadolinite, the locality is "Ehime prefecture, Matsuyama city (north), Takanawa."

The last label has in the upper left corner "oxidized mineral" or "oxide." It looks like this is a Japan-law twinned quartz specimen label. The locality is "Nagasaki prefecture, Goto City, Nagami Island."



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/12/2018 06:48AM by Hiro Inukai.
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Alfredo Petrov October 12, 2018 07:17AM
I agree with Hiro about the locality translations, except the island name for the Japan-law twin = Naru island.
https://www.mindat.org/loc-7322.html (Local people often use unusual readings of their kanji characters, differing from the most common readings.)

The Kita-Shirakawa allanite locality in Kyoto city is https://www.mindat.org/loc-17496.html
It's from decomposed granite outcrops/roadcuts on the back side (east side) of Nyoigatake/"Daimonji". The west side of the mountain (facing the city) is mostly hornfels. Lots of sublocalities here that I haven't had time to add to Mindat yet, and I don't know how much it's worth breaking down this small mountain into ever smaller sublocalities; there's already one with allanite: https://www.mindat.org/loc-262839.html
On a historical note, this was the very first allanite locality found in Japan; many more localities have been discovered since then.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 10/12/2018 07:28AM by Alfredo Petrov.
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Aaron Verrill October 12, 2018 07:54AM
Also of note, the Naru Island Japan Law crystal was found on 水晶岳(written on the bottom corner of the label)、 which translates to Mt. Suisho (Crystal Peak). This locality was famous for these twinned crystals occurring in veins and cavities of Tertiary sandstone. Sadly, the locality has been fenced off and collecting forbidden. I tried to go last year when we visited my wife's hometown.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/12/2018 07:59AM by Aaron Verrill.
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Steve Stuart October 14, 2018 02:27AM
Thanks, for all the responses!
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