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Chloanthite

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Lustre:
Metallic
Name:
Named in 1845 by August Breithaupt for the Greek χλοανθηζ, "turning green" or "budding" because the mineral frequently develops a green coating (of annabergite).
Synonym:
A synonym of Nickelskutterudite
Discredited as a species; originally considered (Ni,Co,Fe)As2-2.5, generally now applied to a supposed arsenic-deficient variety of, or synonym of, nickelskutterudite, ideally NiAs3, though at least some is a mixture, and any As-deficiency is probably not significant.

Renamed nickelskutterudite in 1892 by Elwyn Waller and Alfred Joseph Moses.

Described by Holmes (1926) as nickelian skutterudite, with no evidence for significant As-deficiency.

Roseboom (1962) also considered it to be a synonym of skutterudite, not differentiating a Ni-dominant species: "Prior to Holmes' classification, the nomenclature of the Co, Ni, and Fe arsenides was complicated by the acceptance of arsenide minerals of cobalt and nickel which appeared to have isometric symmetry but whose chemical analyses indicated that they were more nearly diarsenides than triarsenides. "Isometric diarsenides" rich in nickel were called chloanthite and those rich in cobalt were called smaltite. However, the x-ray patterns of various specimens of chloanthite and smaltite were found to correspond to those of skutterudite (group), loellingite, rammelsbergite, safflorite or a mixture of these."

Reported to be an arsenic-deficient nickelskutterudite by Michael Fleischer in 1987, although supporting data seems to be lacking.


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References for ChloanthiteHide

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Breithaupt (1845) Ann. Phys.: 64: 184-185.
Haidinger, W. (1845) Handbuch der bestimmenden Mineralogie, enthaltend die Terminologie, Systematik, Nomenklatur und Charakteristik der Naturgeschichte des Mineralreiches, 650 pp. Braumüller & Seidel, Wien, p. 560. [Skutterudit].
Waller and Moses (1892) Sch. Mines Q.: 14: 49.
Oftedal, I. (1928) Die Kristallstruktur von Skutterudit und Speiskobalt-Chloanthit. Zeitschrift für Kristallographie 66: 517-546.
Holmes, R.J., (1947) Higher mineral arsenides of cobalt, nickel, and iron. Bulletin of the Geological Society of America: 58: 299-392.
Palache, Charles, Harry Berman & Clifford Frondel (1944) The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana Yale University 1837-1892, Volume I: Elements, Sulfides, Sulfosalts, Oxides. John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York. 7th edition, revised and enlarged: 342-347.
Roseboom, E.H. (1962) Skutterudites (Co,Ni,Fe)As3-x: Composition and cell dimensions. American Mineralogist, 47, 310-327.
Fleischer (1987).

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