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Emerald

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Formula:
Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Crystal System:
Hexagonal
Name:
Emerald has priority over beryl as a mineral name. Emerald was known in antiquity and was prized as a gem. In the 1790s, Louis Nicolas Vauquelin, the discoverer of chromium, demonstrated that emerald and beryl were essentially the same chemical compound and that emeralds, sensu strictu, contained chromium. Nonetheless, emerald continued to be listed as the preferred species name for many decades and emerald finally began to be used as a variety name for beryl by the 1830s. New emerald reports referring to ordinary green or even blue beryl persisted in the amateur literature into the twentieth century. In the latter twentieth century, it was discovered that some emeralds contain more vanadium than chromium.
A variety of Beryl

A green gem variety of Beryl, highly sought after as a precious gem stone. The majority of the world's gem quality Emeralds come from the Muzo area of Colombia.

The colour in Emerald is caused by trace amounts of a chromophore such as Chromium or Vanadium.

Visit gemdat.org for gemological information about Emerald.


Chemical Properties of Emerald

Formula:
Be3Al2(Si6O18)

Crystallography of Emerald

Crystal System:
Hexagonal

Synonyms of Emerald

Other Language Names for Emerald

Arabic:زمرد
Bulgarian:Изумруд
Catalan:Maragda
Czech:Smaragd
Danish:Smaragd
Dutch:Smaragd
Esperanto:Smeraldo
Finnish:Smaragdi
French:Émeraude
German:Smaragd
Indonesian:Zamrud
Italian:Smeraldo
Lithuanian:Smaragdas
Norwegian (Bokmål):Smaragd
Polish:Szmaragd
Portuguese:Esmeralda
Romanian:Smarald
Serbian (Cyrillic Script):Смарагд
Simplified Chinese:绿宝石
祖母绿
Slovak:Smaragd
Slovenian:Smaragd
Spanish:Esmeralda
Swedish:Smaragd

Varieties of Emerald

Trapiche emerald

Variety showing six-spoked growth features.

Such "trapiche" formations are also known for other minerals (trapiche tourmaline, trapiche ruby).

Common Associates

Associated Minerals Based on Photo Data:
Calcite150 photos of Emerald associated with Calcite on mindat.org.
Quartz83 photos of Emerald associated with Quartz on mindat.org.
Pyrite62 photos of Emerald associated with Pyrite on mindat.org.
Biotite18 photos of Emerald associated with Biotite on mindat.org.
Schorl15 photos of Emerald associated with Schorl on mindat.org.
Rutile14 photos of Emerald associated with Rutile on mindat.org.
Molybdenite12 photos of Emerald associated with Molybdenite on mindat.org.
Beryl11 photos of Emerald associated with Beryl on mindat.org.
Phenakite9 photos of Emerald associated with Phenakite on mindat.org.
Feldspar Group8 photos of Emerald associated with Feldspar Group on mindat.org.

Other Information

Health Risks:
No information on health risks for this material has been entered into the database. You should always treat mineral specimens with care.

References for Emerald

Reference List:
Sort by Year (asc) | by Year (desc) | by Author (A-Z) | by Author (Z-A)
Sinkankas (1981) "Emeralds and other Beryls".
Extra Lapis English No. 2 "Emeralds of the world"
Extra Lapis No. 22 (in German)
Le, T.-T. H. (2008): Microscopic, chemical and spectroscopic investigations on emeralds of various origins. Dissertation, Universität Mainz, Germany, 113 pp. [http://ubm.opus.hbz-nrw.de/volltexte/2008/1673/pdf/diss.pdf]
Ringsrud, R. (2009): Emeralds, a passionate guide. Green View Press, 250 pp.

Internet Links for Emerald

mindat.org URL:
https://www.mindat.org/min-1375.html
Please feel free to link to this page.
Specimens:
The following Emerald specimens are currently listed for sale on minfind.com.

Localities for Emerald

Mineral and/or Locality  
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