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Ferrimolybdite

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Formula:
Fe2(MoO4)3 · nH2O
System:
Orthorhombic
Colour:
Yellow, canary yellow, ...
Lustre:
Adamantine, Silky, Earthy
Hardness:
1 - 2
Name:
Renamed in 1913 by P. P. Pilipenko in allusion to its chemical composition, containing FERRIc iron and MOLYBDenum.
Originally named "hydrated molybdenum trioxide" by Waldemar T. Schaller.
A rare secondary mineral occurring in the oxidized zones of hydrothermal vein and porphyry-type molybdenum-bearing deposits, or in breccia pipe deposits containing molybdenum. Commonly formed from the alteration of molybdenite.


Classification of Ferrimolybdite

Approved, 'Grandfathered' (first described prior to 1959)
7.GB.30

7 : SULFATES (selenates, tellurates, chromates, molybdates, wolframates)
G : Molybdates, Wolframates and Niobates
B : With additional anions and/or H2O
49.2.1.1

49 : HYDRATED MOLYBDATES AND TUNGSTATES
2 : Hydrated Normal Molybdates and Tungstates
27.3.14

27 : Sulphites, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
3 : Molybdates

Physical Properties of Ferrimolybdite

Adamantine, Silky, Earthy
Diaphaneity (Transparency):
Transparent, Translucent
Colour:
Yellow, canary yellow, or sulfur yellow, greenish yellow; colourless to canary-yellow in transmitted light
Streak:
Light yellow
Hardness (Mohs):
1 - 2
Density:
2.99 g/cm3 (Measured)    3.085 g/cm3 (Calculated)

Optical Data of Ferrimolybdite

Type:
Biaxial (+)
RI values:
nα = 1.720 - 1.810 nβ = 1.730 - 1.830 nγ = 1.850 - 2.040
2V:
Calculated: 26° to 32°
Max Birefringence:
δ = 0.130 - 0.230
Image shows birefringence interference colour range (at 30µm thickness) and does not take into account mineral colouration.
Surface Relief:
Very High
Dispersion:
r < v marked
Pleochroism:
Visible
Comments:
X = Y = Clear to nearly colourless
Z = dirty gray to canary-yellow

Chemical Properties of Ferrimolybdite

Formula:
Fe2(MoO4)3 · nH2O
IMA Formula:
Fe23+(Mo6+O4)3 · 7H2O
Elements listed in formula:

Crystallography of Ferrimolybdite

Crystal System:
Orthorhombic
Class (H-M):
mmm (2/m 2/m 2/m) - Dipyramidal
Space Group:
Pmmn
Cell Parameters:
a = 6.665 Å, b = 15.423 Å, c = 29.901 Å
Ratio:
a:b:c = 0.432 : 1 : 1.939
Unit Cell Volume:
V 3,073.65 ų (Calculated from Unit Cell)
Z:
8
Morphology:
Crystals needlelike to fibrous forming crusts; tufted to radial aggregates; powdery, earthy, films, massive.
Comment:
Class may be mm2; Space Group may be Pm21n.

Occurrences of Ferrimolybdite

Type Occurrence of Ferrimolybdite

Relationship of Ferrimolybdite to other Species

7.GB.05LindgreniteCu3(MoO4)2(OH)2
7.GB.10SzenicsiteCu3(MoO4)(OH)4
7.GB.15CuprotungstiteCu2(WO4)(OH)2
7.GB.15UM1999-38-WO:CrV(V, Cr, W, O, H) [V:Cr:W ratio about 2:1:3]
7.GB.20Phyllotungstite(H2O,M)x(W,Fe)(O,OH)3 · yH2O (M = Ca, Cs, Pb or K)
7.GB.25RankachiteCa0.5(V4+,V5+)(W6+,Fe3+)2O8(OH) · 2H2O
7.GB.35AnthoiniteAlWO3(OH)3
7.GB.35MpororoiteWAlO3(OH)3 · 2(H2O)
7.GB.40Obradovicite-KCu[K2(H2O)17Cu(H2O)6][Mo8As2Fe33+O34(OH)3]
7.GB.45Mendozavilite-NaFe[Na2(H2O)15Fe3+(H2O)6][Mo8P2Fe33+O35(OH)2]
7.GB.45ParamendozaviliteNaAl4Fe7(PO4)5(PMo12O40)(OH)16 · 56H2O
7.GB.50Tancaite-(Ce)FeCe(MoO4)3·3H2O
27.3.1LindgreniteCu3(MoO4)2(OH)2
27.3.2PowelliteCa(MoO4)
27.3.3WulfenitePb(MoO4)
27.3.4KoechliniteBi2MoO6
27.3.5SedoviteU(MoO4)2
27.3.6MouriteUMo5O12(OH)10
27.3.7Iriginite(UO2)Mo2O7 · 3H2O
27.3.8Umohoite(UO2)MoO4 · 2H2O
27.3.9MoluraniteH4U4+(UO2)3(MoO4)7 · 18H2O
27.3.10CousiniteMgU2Mo2O11 · 6H2O
27.3.11Calcurmolite(Ca,Na)2(UO2)3Mo2(O,OH)11 · nH2O
27.3.12TengchongiteCaO · 6UO3 · 2MoO3 · 12H2O
27.3.13KamiokiteFe2Mo3O8

Other Names for Ferrimolybdite

Other Information

Other Information:
Readily soluble in HCl and slowly soluble in ammonia with the separation of ferric hydroxide.
Health Risks:
No information on health risks for this material has been entered into the database. You should always treat mineral specimens with care.

References for Ferrimolybdite

Reference List:
SCHALLER, W.T. (1907): The chemical composition of molybdic ocher. American Journal of Science 173, 297-303.

SCHALLER, W.T. (1908): Notes on powellite and molybdite. American Journal of Science 175, 71-75.

PILIPENKO, P.P. (1913): Mineralogy of the Alekseevkii Mine of Minusinks District. Publisher?, Moscow, Russia (in Russ.).

PEKOV, I.V. (1998): Minerals First Discovered on the Territory of the Former Soviet Union. Ocean Pictures, Moscow, Russia (83, 318).

KERR, P.F., THOMAS, A.W. & LANGER, A.M. (1963): The nature and synthesis of ferrimolybdite. American Mineralogist 48, 14-32.

Karsten, D.L.G. (1800) Mineralogische Tabellen, Berlin. First edition: 54, 79 (as Wasserbleiocker).

Karsten, D.L.G. (1808) Mineralogische Tabellen, Berlin. second edition: 70 (as Molybdänocker).

Hausmann, J.F.L. (1813) Handbuch der Mineralogie 3 volumes, Göttingen: 1: 336 (as Molybdänoxyd).

Dana, J.D. (1854) System of Mineralogy, 4th. Edition, New York: 144.
Breithaupt, A. (1858) Berg.- und hüttenmännisches Zeitung, Freiberg, Leipzig (merged into Glückauf): 17: 125 (as Molybdite [of Breithaupt]).

Greg, R.P. and Lettsom, W.G. (1858) Manual of the Mineralogy of Great Britain and Ireland. 483pp., London: 348 (as Molybdine).

Dana, E.S. (1892) System of Mineralogy, 6th. Edition, New York: 201 (synthetic crystals).

Guild (1907) American Journal of Science: 23: 455.

Schaller (1908) Zeitschrift für Kristallographie, Mineralogie und Petrographie, Leipzig: 44: 13.

Hintze, Carl (1915) Handbuch der Mineralogie. Berlin and Leipzig. 6 volumes: 1 [2A]: 1259 (Ergzbd., 166 (1936)).

Pilipenko (1915) Jb. Min., I: 191.

Smith (1923) Record of the Australian Museum: 14: 101.

Simpson (1926) Journal of the Royal Society of Western Australia: 12: 57.

Carobbi (1927) Reale accademia delle scienze fisische e matematiche, Naples, Rend.: 33: 53.

Carobbi (1930) Bull. Soc. Nat. Napoli: 41: 169.

Larsen, E.S. and Berman, H. (1934) The Microscopic Determination of the Nonopaque Minerals, Second edition, USGS Bulletin 848: 133, 135, 138.

Huang, D., X. Jiang, Y. Wang, and F. Nie (1986) Type, origin and rhenium distribution of the Huanglongpu molybdenum (lead) deposit in Shaanxi province. Bull. Inst. Mineral Deposits, Chinese Acad. Geol. Sci., 6(4), 1–93 (in Chinese with English abstract).

Horn, E., M. Kurahashi, D. Huang, and C. Wu (1995) Crystal data and X-ray powder-diffraction data for ferrimolybdite, Fe2(MoO4)3 •6.8H2O. Powder Diffraction, 10, 101–103.

Internet Links for Ferrimolybdite

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Specimens:
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Localities for Ferrimolybdite

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