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Holdenite

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About HoldeniteHide

Albert F. Holden
Formula:
(Mn2+,Mg)6Zn3(AsO4)2(SiO4)(OH)8
Colour:
Pink, yellowish red, deep red; pink in transmitted light.
Lustre:
Sub-Vitreous, Resinous, Waxy
Hardness:
4
Specific Gravity:
4.11
Crystal System:
Orthorhombic
Name:
Named by Charles Palache and Earl Victor Shannon in honor of Albert Fairchild Holden (31 December 1866, Cleveland, Ohio, USA - 18 May 1913, Cleveland, Ohio, USA), mining engineer and mineral collector of Franklin, New Jersey, USA minerals and benefactor of Harvard University, and in whose mineral collection the type specimen was found. He built the second largest mining and smelting trust in the world, in his day. His companies included the United States Mining Company and the United States Smelting Company. He was inducted into the Mining Hall of Fame in 1990.
This page provides mineralogical data about Holdenite.


Classification of HoldeniteHide

Approved, 'Grandfathered' (first described prior to 1959)
First Published:
1927
8.BE.55

8 : PHOSPHATES, ARSENATES, VANADATES
B : Phosphates, etc., with additional anions, without H2O
E : With only medium-sized cations, (OH, etc.):RO4 > 2:1
43.4.7.1

43 : COMPOUND PHOSPHATES, ETC.
4 : Anhydrous Compound Phosphates, etc·, Containing Hydroxyl or Halogen
20.3.15

20 : Arsenates (also arsenates with phosphate, but without other anions)
3 : Arsenates of Zn, Cd or Hg

Physical Properties of HoldeniteHide

Sub-Vitreous, Resinous, Waxy
Transparency:
Translucent
Colour:
Pink, yellowish red, deep red; pink in transmitted light.
Streak:
White
Hardness:
Cleavage:
Poor/Indistinct
On {010}, poor.
Fracture:
Sub-Conchoidal
Density:
4.11 g/cm3 (Measured)    4.27 g/cm3 (Calculated)
Comment:
Calculated value on Franklin, NJ, material

Optical Data of HoldeniteHide

Type:
Biaxial (+)
RI values:
nα = 1.769 nβ = 1.770 nγ = 1.785
2V:
Measured: 30° , Calculated: 30°
Birefringence:
0.016
Max Birefringence:
δ = 0.016
Image shows birefringence interference colour range (at 30µm thickness)
and does not take into account mineral colouration.
Surface Relief:
Very High
Dispersion:
r > v distinct
Optical Extinction:
Parallel. XYZ = cba
Pleochroism:
Non-pleochroic

Chemical Properties of HoldeniteHide

Formula:
(Mn2+,Mg)6Zn3(AsO4)2(SiO4)(OH)8
IMA Formula:
Mn2+6Zn3(AsO4)2(SiO4)(OH)8

Crystallography of HoldeniteHide

Crystal System:
Orthorhombic
Class (H-M):
mmm (2/m 2/m 2/m) - Dipyramidal
Space Group:
Ccca
Cell Parameters:
a = 11.99 Å, b = 31.46 Å, c = 8.69 Å
Ratio:
a:b:c = 0.381 : 1 : 0.276
Unit Cell V:
3,277.91 ų (Calculated from Unit Cell)
Z:
8
Morphology:
Crystals equant to thick tabular {100}, with α and u relatively large.
Comment:
Cell chosen is Abma

X-Ray Powder DiffractionHide

Powder Diffraction Data:
d-spacingIntensity
5.74 (50)
3.58 (80)
3.41 (60)
2.84 (100)
2.79 (50)
2.58 (80)
2.46 (70)
1.53 (80)
Comments:
ICDD 29-903

Type Occurrence of HoldeniteHide

Geological Setting of Type Material:
Small crystals and small masses in a veinlet coursing through massive zinc ore in a metamorphosed sedimentary Pre-cambrian Zn-Fe-Mn ore body.
Associated Minerals at Type Locality:
Reference:
Palache, C., Shannon, E.V. (1927) Holdenite, a new arsenate of manganese and zinc, from Franklin, New Jersey. American Mineralogist: 12: 144-148.

Other Language Names for HoldeniteHide

German:Holdenit
Spanish:Holdenita

Common AssociatesHide

CalciteCaCO3
FluoriteCaF2
FrankliniteZn2+Fe3+2O4
WillemiteZn2SiO4
Associated Minerals Based on Photo Data:
Franklinite8 photos of Holdenite associated with Franklinite on mindat.org.
Willemite8 photos of Holdenite associated with Willemite on mindat.org.
Calcite5 photos of Holdenite associated with Calcite on mindat.org.
Kraisslite2 photos of Holdenite associated with Kraisslite on mindat.org.
Kolicite2 photos of Holdenite associated with Kolicite on mindat.org.

Related Minerals - Nickel-Strunz GroupingHide

8.BE.05AugeliteAl2(PO4)(OH)3Mon. 2/m : B2/m
8.BE.10GrattarolaiteFe3+3(PO4)O3Trig. 3m : R3m
8.BE.15CornetiteCu3(PO4)(OH)3Orth. mmm (2/m 2/m 2/m) : Pbca
8.BE.20ClinoclaseCu3(AsO4)(OH)3Mon. 2/m : P21/b
8.BE.25ArhbariteCu2Mg(AsO4)(OH)3Tric. 1 : P1
8.BE.25GilmariteCu3(AsO4)(OH)3Tric.
8.BE.30AllactiteMn2+7(AsO4)2(OH)8Mon. 2/m : P21/b
8.BE.30FlinkiteMn2+2Mn3+(AsO4)(OH)4Orth.
8.BE.30RaadeiteMg7(PO4)2(OH)8Mon. 2/m
8.BE.30ArganditeMn7(VO4)2(OH)8Mon. 2/m : P21/m
8.BE.35Chlorophoenicite(Mn,Mg)3Zn2(AsO4)(OH,O)6Mon. 2/m : B2/m
8.BE.35Magnesiochlorophoenicite(Mg,Mn)3Zn2(AsO4)(OH,O)6Mon. 2/m : B2/m
8.BE.40Gerdtremmelite(Zn,Fe)(Al,Fe)2(AsO4)(OH)5Tric.
8.BE.45DixeniteCuMn2+14Fe2+(SiO4)2(As5+O4)(As3+O3)5(OH)6Trig.
8.BE.45Hematolite(Mn,Mg,Al,Fe3+)15(As5+O4)2(As3+O3)(OH)23Trig. 3 : R3
8.BE.45KraissliteZn3(Mn,Mg)25(Fe3+,Al)(As3+O3)2[(Si,As5+)O4]10(OH)16Orth. 2 2 2 : C2 2 21
8.BE.45McgoverniteMn19Zn3(AsO4)3(AsO3)(SiO4)3(OH)21Trig. 3m (3 2/m)
8.BE.45Arakiite(Zn,Mn2+)(Mn2+,Mg)12(Fe3+,Al)2(As5+O4)2(As3+O3)(OH)23Mon.
8.BE.45Turtmannite(Mn,Mg)22.5Mg3-3x((V5+,As5+)O4)3(As3+O3)x(SiO4)3O5-5x(OH)20+xTrig.
8.BE.45CarlfrancisiteMn2+3(Mn2+,Mg,Fe3+,Al)42[As3+O3]2(As5+O4)4[(Si,As5+)O4]6[(As5+,Si)O4]2(OH)42 Trig. 3m (3 2/m) : R3c
8.BE.50SynadelphiteMn2+9(As5+O4)2(As3+O3)(OH)9 · 2H2OOrth. mmm (2/m 2/m 2/m) : Pnma
8.BE.60KoliciteMn2+7Zn4(AsO4)2(SiO4)2(OH)8Orth. mmm (2/m 2/m 2/m) : Cmca
8.BE.65Sabelliite(Cu,Zn)2Zn(AsO4,SbO4)(OH)3Trig. 3 : P3
8.BE.70JarosewichiteMn2+3Mn3+(AsO4)(OH)6Orth. 2 2 2
8.BE.75TheisiteCu5Zn5(AsO4,SbO4)2(OH)14Orth.
8.BE.80CoparsiteCu4(AsO4,VO4)O2ClOrth.
8.BE.85WaterhouseiteMn2+7(PO4)2(OH)8Mon. 2/m : P21/b

Related Minerals - Hey's Chemical Index of Minerals GroupingHide

20.3.1AdamiteZn2(AsO4)(OH)Orth. mmm (2/m 2/m 2/m) : Pnnm
20.3.2ParadamiteZn2(AsO4)(OH)Tric. 1 : P1
20.3.3KoritnigiteZn(HAsO4) · H2OTric. 1 : P1
20.3.4LegranditeZn2(AsO4)(OH) · H2OMon. 2/m : P21/b
20.3.5WarikahniteZn3(AsO4)2 · 2H2OTric.
20.3.6KöttigiteZn3(AsO4)2 · 8H2OMon. 2/m : B2/m
20.3.7StranskiiteZn2Cu(AsO4)2Tric. 1 : P1
20.3.8Philipsburgite(Cu,Zn)6(AsO4,PO4)2(OH)6 · H2OMon.
20.3.9AustiniteCaZn(AsO4)(OH)Orth. 2 2 2 : P21 21 21
20.3.10ProsperiteCa2Zn4(AsO4)4 · H2OMon.
20.3.11GaititeCa2Zn(AsO4)2 · 2H2OTric.
20.3.12ZincroseliteCa2Zn(AsO4)2 · 2H2OMon.
20.3.13O'DanieliteNa(Zn,Mg)3H2(AsO4)3Mon. 2/m : B2/b
20.3.14JohilleriteNa(Mg,Zn)3Cu(AsO4)3Mon. 2/m : B2/b
20.3.16Chudobaite(Mg,Zn)5(AsO4)2(HAsO4)2 · 10H2OTric.
20.3.17Chlorophoenicite(Mn,Mg)3Zn2(AsO4)(OH,O)6Mon. 2/m : B2/m
20.3.18LotharmeyeriteCa(Zn,Mn3+)2(AsO4)2 · 2(H2O,OH)Mon. 2/m : B2/m
20.3.19Metaköttigite(Zn,Fe,Fe)3(AsO4)2 · 8(H2O,OH)Tric. 1 : P1
20.3.20OjuelaiteZnFe3+2(AsO4)2(OH)2 · 4H2OMon.
20.3.21FahleiteCaZn5Fe3+2(AsO4)6 · 14H2OOrth.
20.3.22KeyiteCu2+3Zn4Cd2(AsO4)6 · 2H2OMon. 2/m

Fluorescence of HoldeniteHide

Not fluorescent in UV. Fluorescent material may be fluorite which can superficially resemble holdenite.

Other InformationHide

Health Risks:
No information on health risks for this material has been entered into the database. You should always treat mineral specimens with care.

References for HoldeniteHide

Reference List:
Sort by Year (asc) | by Year (desc) | by Author (A-Z) | by Author (Z-A)
Palache, C., Shannon, E.V. (1927) Holdenite, a new arsenate of manganese and zinc, from Franklin, New Jersey. American Mineralogist: 12: 144-148.
Prewitt-Hopkins, J. (1949) X-ray study of holdenite, mooreite, and torreyite. American Mineralogist: 34: 589-595.
Palache, C., Berman, H., Frondel, C. (1951) The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II. John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 7th edition, revised and enlarged, 1124 pp.: 775-777.
Moore, P.B., Araki, T. (1977) Holdenite, a novel cubic close-packed structure. American Mineralogist: 62: 513-521.

Internet Links for HoldeniteHide

Localities for HoldeniteHide

This map shows a selection of localities that have latitude and longitude coordinates recorded. Click on the symbol to view information about a locality. The symbol next to localities in the list can be used to jump to that position on the map.

Locality ListHide

- This locality has map coordinates listed. - This locality has estimated coordinates. ⓘ - Click for further information on this occurrence. ? - Indicates mineral may be doubtful at this locality. - Good crystals or important locality for species. - World class for species or very significant. (TL) - Type Locality for a valid mineral species. (FRL) - First Recorded Locality for everything else (eg varieties). Struck out - Mineral was erroneously reported from this locality. Faded * - Never found at this locality but inferred to have existed at some point in the past (eg from pseudomorphs.)

All localities listed without proper references should be considered as questionable.
USA (TL)
 
  • New Jersey
    • Sussex Co.
      • Franklin mining district
Palache, C. (1935), USGS Professional Paper 180:125; Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II: 777; Dunn, P.J. (1995): Part 3: 376.
        • Ogdensburg
          • Sterling Hill
Dunn, P.J., Mineralogical Record:12: 373-375; Dunn, P.J. (1995): Part 3: 376.
Mineral and/or Locality  
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