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Mallardite

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About MallarditeHide

François Ernest Mallard
Formula:
MnSO4 · 7H2O
Colour:
Light rose pink; colourless in transmitted light.
Lustre:
Vitreous
Hardness:
2
Specific Gravity:
1.846
Crystal System:
Monoclinic
Name:
Named in 1926 by F Zambonini and G. Carrobbi in honor of François Ernest Mallard [February 4, 1833 Châteauneuf-sur-Cher, France - July 6, 1894 Paris, France], French crystallographer. Mallard was trained as a mining engineer as well as a mineralogist. In 1859, he was professor at the School of Mines (Saint Etienne) and, in 1872, professor at the School of mines in Paris in 1872. mallard made many contributions. Particularly, he solved important problems relating to minerals that had anomalous optical properties and discovered that minerals with low symmetry could appear to have higher symmetry due to stacking of small low-symmetry domains. This discovery led to solutions to the problems relating to pseudo-symmetry and optical effects relating to crystal clusters. Mallard wrote the important two volume, Traité de Cristallographie, in 1879 and 1884. Because of his practical nature as an engineer, Mallard's work with Henry Le Chatelier solve issues relating to gas explosions in mines. Mallard was also a field mapping geologist, as well.
Melanterite Group.

Water-soluble; quickly dehydrates at room temperature.


Classification of MallarditeHide

Approved, 'Grandfathered' (first described prior to 1959)
7.CB.35

7 : SULFATES (selenates, tellurates, chromates, molybdates, wolframates)
C : Sulfates (selenates, etc.) without additional anions, with H2O
B : With only medium-sized cations
29.6.10.5

29 : HYDRATED ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
6 : AXO4·xH2O
25.9.3

25 : Sulphates
9 : Sulphates of Mn

Physical Properties of MallarditeHide

Vitreous
Transparency:
Transparent, Translucent
Colour:
Light rose pink; colourless in transmitted light.
Streak:
White
Hardness:
Cleavage:
Distinct/Good
On {001} good; possibly also on {110}.
Density:
1.846 g/cm3 (Measured)    1.838 g/cm3 (Calculated)
Comment:
Density measured on artificial material.

Optical Data of MallarditeHide

Type:
Biaxial (+)
RI values:
nα = 1.462 nβ = 1.465 nγ = 1.474
Max Birefringence:
δ = 0.012
Image shows birefringence interference colour range (at 30µm thickness)
and does not take into account mineral colouration.
Surface Relief:
Moderate
Dispersion:
r > v strong

Chemical Properties of MallarditeHide

Formula:
MnSO4 · 7H2O
IMA Formula:
Mn(SO4) · 7H2O

Crystallography of MallarditeHide

Crystal System:
Monoclinic
Class (H-M):
2/m - Prismatic
Space Group:
P2/m
Cell Parameters:
a = 14.15 Å, b = 6.5 Å, c = 11.06 Å
β = 105.6°
Ratio:
a:b:c = 2.177 : 1 : 1.702
Unit Cell V:
979.77 ų (Calculated from Unit Cell)
Z:
4
Morphology:
Artificial crystals are tabular {001}. Fibrous masses and crusts.

Type Occurrence of MallarditeHide

Other Language Names for MallarditeHide

German:Mallardit
Spanish:Mallardita

Relationship of Mallardite to other SpeciesHide

Other Members of this group:
Alpersite(Mg,Cu)[SO4] · 7H2OMon. 2/m : P21/b
BieberiteCoSO4 · 7H2OMon. 2/m : P2/m
BoothiteCuSO4 · 7H2OMon.
MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2OMon. 2/m : P21/b
Zincmelanterite(Zn,Cu,Fe)SO4 · 7H2OMon.

Related Minerals - Nickel-Strunz GroupingHide

7.CB.05Dwornikite(Ni,Fe)SO4 · H2OMon. 2/m : B2/b
7.CB.05GunningiteZnSO4 · H2OMon. 2/m : B2/b
7.CB.05KieseriteMgSO4 · H2OMon. 2/m
7.CB.05Poitevinite(Cu,Fe)SO4 · H2OTric.
7.CB.05SzmikiteMnSO4 · H2OMon.
7.CB.05SzomolnokiteFeSO4 · H2OMon. 2/m : B2/b
7.CB.05CobaltkieseriteCoSO4 · H2OMon. 2/m : B2/b
7.CB.07SanderiteMgSO4 · 2H2OOrth. 2 2 2 : P21 21 21
7.CB.10BonattiteCuSO4 · 3H2OMon.
7.CB.15Aplowite(Co,Mn,Ni)SO4 · 4H2OMon. 2/m
7.CB.15Boyleite(Zn,Mg)SO4 · 4H2OMon. 2/m : P21/b
7.CB.15Ilesite(Mn,Zn,Fe)SO4 · 4H2OMon. 2/m
7.CB.15RozeniteFeSO4 · 4H2OMon. 2/m : P21/b
7.CB.15StarkeyiteMgSO4 · 4H2OMon. 2/m : P21/b
7.CB.15DrobeciteCdSO4 · 4H2OMon. 2/m : P21/m
7.CB.15CranswickiteMgSO4 · 4H2OMon. m : Bb
7.CB.20ChalcanthiteCuSO4 · 5H2OTric. 1 : P1
7.CB.20JôkokuiteMnSO4 · 5H2OTric.
7.CB.20PentahydriteMgSO4 · 5H2OTric.
7.CB.20SiderotilFeSO4 · 5H2OTric.
7.CB.25Bianchite(Zn,Fe)SO4 · 6H2OMon. 2/m : P2/m
7.CB.25Chvaleticeite(Mn,Mg)SO4 · 6H2OMon. 2/m : B2/b
7.CB.25FerrohexahydriteFeSO4 · 6H2OMon. 2/m : B2/b
7.CB.25HexahydriteMgSO4 · 6H2OMon. 2/m : P2/m
7.CB.25Moorhouseite(Co,Ni,Mn)SO4 · 6H2OMon.
7.CB.25Nickelhexahydrite(Ni,Mg,Fe)SO4 · 6H2OMon.
7.CB.30RetgersiteNiSO4 · 6H2OTet. 4 2 2 : P41 21 2
7.CB.35BieberiteCoSO4 · 7H2OMon. 2/m : P2/m
7.CB.35BoothiteCuSO4 · 7H2OMon.
7.CB.35MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2OMon. 2/m : P21/b
7.CB.35Zincmelanterite(Zn,Cu,Fe)SO4 · 7H2OMon.
7.CB.35Alpersite(Mg,Cu)[SO4] · 7H2OMon. 2/m : P21/b
7.CB.40EpsomiteMgSO4 · 7H2OOrth. 2 2 2 : P21 21 21
7.CB.40GoslariteZnSO4 · 7H2OOrth. 2 2 2 : P21 21 21
7.CB.40MorenositeNiSO4 · 7H2OOrth. 2 2 2 : P21 21 21
7.CB.45AlunogenAl2(SO4)3 · 17H2OTric. 1
7.CB.45Meta-alunogenAl2(SO4)3 · 12H2O
7.CB.50AluminocoquimbiteFeAl(SO4)3 · 9H2OTrig. 3m (3 2/m) : P3 1c
7.CB.55CoquimbiteFe2-xAlx(SO4)3 · 9H2O, x ~0.5Trig. 3m (3 2/m) : P3 1c
7.CB.55ParacoquimbiteFe2(SO4)3 · 9H2OTrig. 3 : R3
7.CB.55Rhomboclase(H5O2)Fe3+(SO4)2 · 2H2OOrth. mmm (2/m 2/m 2/m) : Pnma
7.CB.60KorneliteFe2(SO4)3 · 7H2OMon. 2/m : P21/m
7.CB.65QuenstedtiteFe2(SO4)3 · 11H2OTric. 1 : P1
7.CB.70LauseniteFe2(SO4)3·5H2OMon. 2/m : P21/m
7.CB.75LishizheniteZnFe2(SO4)4 · 14H2OTric. 1 : P1
7.CB.75RömeriteFe2+Fe3+2(SO4)4 · 14H2OTric. 1 : P1
7.CB.80RansomiteCuFe2(SO4)4 · 6H2OMon. 2/m : P21/b
7.CB.85ApjohniteMn2+Al2(SO4)4 · 22H2OMon.
7.CB.85BíliniteFe2+Fe3+2(SO4)4 · 22H2OMon. 2/m : P21/b
7.CB.85Dietrichite(Zn,Fe2+,Mn2+)Al2(SO4)4 · 22H2OMon. 2/m : P21/b
7.CB.85HalotrichiteFeAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2OMon. 2 : P2
7.CB.85PickeringiteMgAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2OMon. 2/m : P21/b
7.CB.85Redingtonite(Fe2+,Mg,Ni)(Cr,Al)2(SO4)4·22H2OMon.
7.CB.85Wupatkiite(Co,Mg,Ni)Al2(SO4)4·22H2OMon.
7.CB.90MeridianiiteMgSO4 · 11H2OTric. 1 : P1

Related Minerals - Dana Grouping (8th Ed.)Hide

29.6.10.1MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2OMon. 2/m : P21/b
29.6.10.2BoothiteCuSO4 · 7H2OMon.
29.6.10.3Zincmelanterite(Zn,Cu,Fe)SO4 · 7H2OMon.
29.6.10.4BieberiteCoSO4 · 7H2OMon. 2/m : P2/m

Related Minerals - Hey's Chemical Index of Minerals GroupingHide

25.9.1SzmikiteMnSO4 · H2OMon.
25.9.2JôkokuiteMnSO4 · 5H2OTric.
25.9.4ManganolangbeiniteK2Mn2(SO4)3Iso. 2 3 : P21 3
25.9.5Chvaleticeite(Mn,Mg)SO4 · 6H2OMon. 2/m : B2/b
25.9.6DespujolsiteCa3Mn4+(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2OHex. 6 m2 : P62c
25.9.7ApjohniteMn2+Al2(SO4)4 · 22H2OMon.
25.9.8ShigaiteMn6Al3(OH)18[Na(H2O)6](SO4)2 · 6H2OTrig.
25.9.9Ilesite(Mn,Zn,Fe)SO4 · 4H2OMon. 2/m
25.9.10MooreiteMg92Mn2Zn4(SO4)2(OH)26 · 8H2OMon. 2/m : P2/b
25.9.11Torreyite(Mg,Mn2+)72Mn2+2Zn4(SO4)2(OH)22 · 8H2OMon. 2/m : P21/b
25.9.12Lawsonbauerite(Mn2+,Mg)9Zn4(SO4)2(OH)22 · 8H2OMon. 2/m : P21/b
25.9.13Dietrichite(Zn,Fe2+,Mn2+)Al2(SO4)4 · 22H2OMon. 2/m : P21/b

Other InformationHide

Special Storage/
Display Requirements:
Quickly dehydrates at room temperature
Health Risks:
No information on health risks for this material has been entered into the database. You should always treat mineral specimens with care.

References for MallarditeHide

Reference List:
Sort by Year (asc) | by Year (desc) | by Author (A-Z) | by Author (Z-A)
Carnot (1879) Bulletin de la Société française de Minéralogie: 2: 117.
Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II. John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 7th edition, revised and enlarged, 1124 pp.: 507-508.
Neues Jahrbuch für Mineralogie, Monatshefte (1986): 123.

Internet Links for MallarditeHide

Localities for MallarditeHide

This map shows a selection of localities that have latitude and longitude coordinates recorded. Click on the symbol to view information about a locality. The symbol next to localities in the list can be used to jump to that position on the map.

Locality ListHide

- This locality has map coordinates listed. - This locality has estimated coordinates. ⓘ - Click for further information on this occurrence. ? - Indicates mineral may be doubtful at this locality. - Good crystals or important locality for species. - World class for species or very significant. (TL) - Type Locality for a valid mineral species. (FRL) - First Recorded Locality for everything else (eg varieties). Struck out - Mineral was erroneously reported from this locality. Faded * - Never found at this locality but inferred to have existed at some point in the past (eg from pseudomorphs.)

All localities listed without proper references should be considered as questionable.
Australia
 
  • New South Wales
    • Yancowinna Co.
      • Broken Hill district
Lawrence, L. J., Stocksiek, C. M. and Williams, P. A. (1993): Mallardite from Broken Hill, New South Wales. Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 126, 165-166.
Czech Republic
 
  • Karlovy Vary Region
    • Krušné Hory Mts (Erzgebirge)
      • Jáchymov District (St Joachimsthal)
Lapis 2002(7/8), 63-65
  • Pardubice Region
Pašava, J., Breiter, K., Huka, M., Korecký, J.: Parageneze druhotných železnatých, hořečnatých a manganatých síranů z Chvaletic. Věstník Ústředního ústavu geologického, 1986, roč. 61, č. 2, s. 73-82.
France
 
  • Grand Est
    • Haut-Rhin
Wittern, Journée: "Mineralien finden in den Vogesen", von Loga (Cologne), 1997
Italy
 
  • Trentino-Alto Adige (Trentino-Südtirol)
    • Trento Province
      • Valsugana
        • Levico Terme
Exel, R. (1987): Guida mineralogica del Trentino e del Sudtirolo. Athesia, Bolzano, 204 pp.
Japan
 
  • Hokkaido
    • Oshima peninsula
      • Hiyama Subprefecture
        • Kaminokuni
Encyclopedia of Mins., 2nd Ed:519.; Nambu et al (1979) Ganseki-Koubutsu-Koshogaku Zasshi (JAMP), 74, 406-412.
Peru
 
  • Pasco department
    • Pasco province
      • Cerro de Pasco
Smuda, Jochen; Dold, Bernhard; Friese, Kurt; Morgenstern, Peter; Glaesser, Walter (2007): Mineralogical and geochemical study of element mobility at the sulfide-​rich Excelsior waste rock dump from the polymetallic Zn-​Pb-​(Ag-​Bi-​Cu) ore deposit, Cerro de Pasco, Peru. Journal of Geochemical Exploration, 92, 97-110.
Russia
 
  • Far-Eastern Region
    • Kamchatka Oblast'
      • Tolbachik volcano
        • Great Fissure eruption (Main Fracture)
          • Northern Breakthrough (North Breach)
Vergasova, L. P., Filatov, S. K., & Dunin-Barkovskaya, V. V. (2007). Posteruptive activity on the First Cone of the Great Tolbachik Fissure Eruption and recent volcanogenic generation of bauxites. Journal of Volcanology and Seismology, 1(2), 119-139.
Spain
 
  • Andalusia
    • Huelva
      • Minas de Riotinto
[MinRec 27:284]
USA
 
  • Colorado
    • Teller Co.
      • Cripple Creek District
Min Rec 36:2 pp143-185
  • New Mexico
    • Grant Co.
Minerals of New Mexico 3rd ed.
Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II: 508.
    • Sierra Co.
Northrop, Minerals of New Mexico, 3rd Rev. Ed., 1996
  • Utah
    • Salt Lake Co.
      • Oquirrh Mts
        • Bingham District (West Mountain District)
North, Jerry (2010) Displays of Nature : History, Minerals & Crystals of Utah's Bingham Canyon Copper Mine.
UGMS Bull 117 Minerals and Mineral Localities of Utah
Mineral and/or Locality  
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