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Monimolite

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About MonimoliteHide

Formula:
Pb2Sb5+2O7
Formula as recorded in current (2018) IMA mineral list.
Colour:
Yellow, gray-green, dark brown
Lustre:
Adamantine, Greasy
Hardness:
4½ - 6
Specific Gravity:
5.94 - 7.29
Crystal System:
Isometric
Name:
From the Greek μόυĭμος = "monimos" for "stable," in allusion to the difficulty with which it is decomposed chemically.
A secondary mineral occurring in calcite veins in iron and manganese deposits and in the oxidized zone of a polymetallic deposit.

The problematical species monimolite (Igelström 1865, Mason & Vitaliano 1953) is almost certainly identical with oxyplumboroméite, but needs re-examination. According to Hålenius and Bosi (2013), monimolite should be discredited.


Classification of MonimoliteHide

'Grandfathered' (first described prior to 1959), Questionable
4.DH.20

4 : OXIDES (Hydroxides, V[5,6] vanadates, arsenites, antimonites, bismuthites, sulfites, selenites, tellurites, iodates)
D : Metal: Oxygen = 1:2 and similar
H : With large (+- medium-sized) cations; sheets of edge-sharing octahedra
44.1.1.4

44 : ANTIMONATES
1 : A2X2O6(O,OH,F)
24.3.6

24 : Antimonates and Antimonites
3 : Antimonates of Ti and Pb

Physical Properties of MonimoliteHide

Adamantine, Greasy
Transparency:
Opaque
Colour:
Yellow, gray-green, dark brown
Streak:
Straw-yellow to cinnamon-brown
Hardness:
4½ - 6 on Mohs scale
Cleavage:
Poor/Indistinct
Indistinct on {111}.
Fracture:
Splintery, Sub-Conchoidal
Density:
5.94 - 7.29 g/cm3 (Measured)    

Optical Data of MonimoliteHide

Type:
Isotropic
RI values:
n = 2.06
Birefringence:
Isotropic minerals have no birefringence
Surface Relief:
Very High
Comments:
May exhibit weak anisotropism.

Chemical Properties of MonimoliteHide

Formula:
Pb2Sb5+2O7

Formula as recorded in current (2018) IMA mineral list.
Common Impurities:
Fe

Crystallography of MonimoliteHide

Crystal System:
Isometric
Class (H-M):
m3m (4/m 3 2/m) - Hexoctahedral
Cell Parameters:
a = 10.47 Å
Unit Cell V:
1,147.73 ų (Calculated from Unit Cell)
Morphology:
Crystals are octahedra with {113}, or less commonly, cube-dominant, with {111} and {011}.
Comment:
Class is probable.

First Recorded Occurrence of MonimoliteHide

Geological Setting of First Recorded Material:
Calcite veins in an iron and manganese deposit.
Associated Minerals at First Recorded Locality:

Synonyms of MonimoliteHide

Other Language Names for MonimoliteHide

Related Minerals - Nickel-Strunz GroupingHide

4.DH.Fluornatropyrochlore(Na,Pb,Ca,REE,U)2Nb2O6FIso. m3m (4/m 3 2/m)
4.DH.Roméite Group
4.DH.Hydroxykenomicrolite(◻,Na,Sb3+)2Ta2O6(OH)Iso.
4.DH.OxyplumboroméitePb2Sb2O6OIso. m3m (4/m 3 2/m) : Fd3m
4.DH.Cesiokenopyrochlore□Nb2(O,OH)6Cs1−x (x ∼ 0.20)Iso. m3m (4/m 3 2/m) : Fd3m
4.DH.05Brannerite(U4+,REE,Th,Ca)(Ti,Fe3+,Nb)2(O,OH)6Mon. 2/m : B2/m
4.DH.05OrthobranneriteU4+U6+Ti4O12(OH)2Orth.
4.DH.05Thorutite(Th,U,Ca)Ti2(O,OH)6Mon.
4.DH.10KassiteCaTi2O4(OH)2Orth.
4.DH.10Lucasite-(Ce)CeTi2(O,OH)6Mon.
4.DH.15Bariomicrolite (of Hogarth 1977)Iso. m3m (4/m 3 2/m) : Fd3m
4.DH.15Betafite (of Hogarth 1977)A2-mD2X6-wZ1+wIso. m3m (4/m 3 2/m) : Fd3m
4.DH.15Bismutomicrolite (of Hogarth 1977)Iso. m3m (4/m 3 2/m) : Fd3m
4.DH.15Ceriopyrochlore (of Hogarth 1977)A2Nb2(O,OH)6Z
4.DH.15JixianitePb(W,Fe3+)2(O,OH)7Iso. m3m (4/m 3 2/m) : Fd3m
4.DH.15Hydropyrochlore(H2O,□)2Nb2(O,OH)6(H2O)Iso. m3m (4/m 3 2/m) : Fd3m
4.DH.15Plumbopyrochlore (of Skorobogatova et al.)A2Nb2(O,OH)6Z
4.DH.15Plumbomicrolite (of Hogarth 1977)
4.DH.15Plumbobetafite (of Hogarth 1977)A2-mD2X6-wZ1-n
4.DH.15Stibiomicrolite (of Groat et al.)
4.DH.15Strontiopyrochlore (of Hogarth 1977)A2Nb2(O,OH)6Z
4.DH.15Stannomicrolite (of Hogarth 1977)
4.DH.15Stibiobetafite (of Černý et al.)A2-mD2X6-wZ1-nIso.
4.DH.15Uranpyrochlore (of Hogarth 1977)(Ca,U,Ce)2(Nb,Ti,Ta)2O6(OH,F)Iso.
4.DH.15Yttropyrochlore (of Hogarth 1977)A2Nb2(O,OH)6Z
4.DH.15Fluornatromicrolite(Na1.5Bi0.5)Ta2O6FIso. m3m (4/m 3 2/m) : Fd3m
4.DH.15Bismutopyrochlore (of Chukanov et al.)(Bi,Ca,U,Pb)2-xNb2(O,OH)6(OH)Amor.
4.DH.15Hydrokenoelsmoreite2W2O6(H2O)Iso. m3m (4/m 3 2/m) : Fd3m
4.DH.20BismutostibiconiteBi(Sb5+,Fe3+)2O7Iso. m3m (4/m 3 2/m) : Fd3m
4.DH.20BindheimitePb2Sb2O6OIso. m3m (4/m 3 2/m) : Fd3m
4.DH.20CuproroméiteCu2Sb2(O,OH)7Iso.
4.DH.20StetefeldtiteAg2Sb2(O,OH)7Iso.
4.DH.20StibiconiteSb3+Sb5+2O6(OH)
4.DH.25RosiaitePbSb5+2O6Trig. 3m (3 2/m) : P3 1m
4.DH.30ZirconoliteCaZrTi2O7Orth.
4.DH.35LiandratiteU(Nb,Ta)2O8Trig.
4.DH.35PetscheckiteUFe(Nb,Ta)2O8Hex.
4.DH.40IngersoniteCa3Mn2+Sb5+4O14Trig. 3 2 : P31 2 1
4.DH.45PittongiteNa0.22(W,Fe3+)(O,OH)3 · 0.44H2OHex. 6 m2 : P6m2

Related Minerals - Dana Grouping (8th Ed.)Hide

44.1.1.1StibiconiteSb3+Sb5+2O6(OH)
44.1.1.2BindheimitePb2Sb2O6OIso. m3m (4/m 3 2/m) : Fd3m
44.1.1.3Roméite Group
44.1.1.5StetefeldtiteAg2Sb2(O,OH)7Iso.
44.1.1.6BismutostibiconiteBi(Sb5+,Fe3+)2O7Iso. m3m (4/m 3 2/m) : Fd3m
44.1.1.7CuproroméiteCu2Sb2(O,OH)7Iso.

Related Minerals - Hey's Chemical Index of Minerals GroupingHide

24.3.2DerbyliteFe3+4Ti3Sb3+O13(OH)Mon. 2/m : P21/m
24.3.3Hemloite(Ti,V3+,Fe3+,Al)12(As3+,Sb3+)2O23(OH)Tric. 1 : P1
24.3.4NadoritePbSbClO2Orth. mmm (2/m 2/m 2/m) : Cmcm
24.3.5BindheimitePb2Sb2O6OIso. m3m (4/m 3 2/m) : Fd3m
24.3.7ThorikositePb3Cl2(OH)(SbO3,AsO3)Tet. 4/mmm (4/m 2/m 2/m) : I4/mmm

Other InformationHide

Health Risks:
No information on health risks for this material has been entered into the database. You should always treat mineral specimens with care.

References for MonimoliteHide

Reference List:
Sort by Year (asc) | by Year (desc) | by Author (A-Z) | by Author (Z-A)
Igelström (1865) Ak. Stockholm, Öfv.: 22: 227.
Nordenskiöld (1870) Ak. Stockholm, Öfversigy: 27: 550.
Nordenskiöld (1877) Geologiska Föeningens I Stockholm. Förhandlinger, Stockholm: 3: 379.
Flink (1887) Ak. Stockholm, Bihang: 12, Part 2, [2]: 35.
Palache, C., Berman, H., and Frondel, C. (1951) The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II. John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 7th edition, revised and enlarged, 1124 pp.: 1023.
Mason, B. and Vitaliano, C.J. (1953) The mineralogy of the antimony oxides and antimonates. Mineralogical Magazine: 30: 100–112.
Arkiv för Mineralogi och Geologi (1969): 4: 525.
Anthony, J.W., Bideaux, R.A., Bladh, K.W., and Nichols, M.C. (1997) Handbook of Mineralogy, Volume III. Halides, Hydroxides, Oxides. Mineral Data Publishing, Tucson, AZ, 628pp.: 379.
Christy, A.G. and Atencio, D. (2013) Clarification of status of species in the pyrochlore supergroup. Mineralogical Magazine: 77: 13-20.
Hålenius, U. and Bosi, F. (2013) Oxyplumboroméite, Pb2Sb2O7, a new mineral species of the pyrochlore supergroup from Harstigen mine, Värmland, Sweden. Mineralogical Magazine: 77: 2931-2939.

Internet Links for MonimoliteHide

Localities for MonimoliteHide

This map shows a selection of localities that have latitude and longitude coordinates recorded. Click on the symbol to view information about a locality. The symbol next to localities in the list can be used to jump to that position on the map.

Locality ListHide

- This locality has map coordinates listed. - This locality has estimated coordinates. ⓘ - Click for further information on this occurrence. ? - Indicates mineral may be doubtful at this locality. - Good crystals or important locality for species. - World class for species or very significant. (TL) - Type Locality for a valid mineral species. (FRL) - First Recorded Locality for everything else (eg varieties). Struck out - Mineral was erroneously reported from this locality. Faded * - Never found at this locality but inferred to have existed at some point in the past (eg from pseudomorphs.)

All localities listed without proper references should be considered as questionable.
Kazakhstan
 
  • North Kazakhstan
    • Stepnyak
P.M. Kartashov data
Sweden
 
  • Värmland
    • Filipstad
Nysten, P., Holtstam, D. and Jonsson, E. (1999) The Långban minerals. In Långban - The mines,their minerals, geology and explorers (D. Holtstam and J. Langhof, eds.), Swedish Museum of Natural History and Raster Förlag, Stockholm & Chr. Weise Verlag, Munich, pp. 89-183.
      • Persberg district
        • Pajsberg
Igelström (1865) Öfversigt KVA handl, pp. 227-9; Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II: 1023..
No reference listed
USA
 
  • Utah
    • Tooele Co.
      • Gold Hill District (Clifton District)
        • Gold Hill
UGMS Bull 117 Minerals and Mineral Localities of Utah
Mineral and/or Locality  
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