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Nano-Polycrystalline Diamond

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Formula:
C
A variety of Diamond

A completely transparent, polycrystalline synthetic consisting of randomly oriented, very tightly bonded nanoscale-sized diamond crystallites.

Using a sintering process, the material is created in a multi-anvil press at 15 gigapascals (2.18 million psi) and 2,300 to 2,500°C. High-purity graphite is thus converted directly into cubic diamond in a matter of minutes. The resulting NPD is composed of a mixture of 10-20 nm equigranular crystallites and 30-100 nm lamellar crystalline structures. It is harder and tougher than natural diamond and can be fashioned into a variety of shapes using lasers, even a perfect sphere - a shape which would be virtually impossible using single crystal diamond. (see G&G Summer 2012)


Visit gemdat.org for gemological information about Nano-Polycrystalline Diamond.


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Chemical Properties of Nano-Polycrystalline DiamondHide

Other InformationHide

Health Risks:
No information on health risks for this material has been entered into the database. You should always treat mineral specimens with care.

References for Nano-Polycrystalline DiamondHide

Reference List:
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Irifune, T. and Hemley, R.J. (2012) Synthetic diamond opens windows into the deep earth. EOS, transactions, American Geophysical Union, Vol. 93, No. 7, pp 65-66
Skalwold, E.A. (2012) Nano-polycrystalline diamond: circle the wagons or embrace as a gem of the future? The GemGuide, Gem Market News, Vol. 31, No. 6, pp. . http://gemguide.com/2012/11/01/nano-polycrystalline-synthetic-diamond-circle-the-wagons-or-embrace-as-a-gem-of-the-future/
Skalwold, E.A., Renfro N., Shigley J.E., and Breeding, C.M. (2012) Characterization of a synthetic nano-polycrystalline diamond gemstone. Gems & Gemology, Vol. 48, No. 3, pp. 188-192. http://www.gia.edu/research-resources/gems-gemology/issues/fall2012-contents/fall-2012-skalwold.html .
Skalwold E.A., Renfro N., Breeding C.M., Shigley, J.E. (2012) Transparent, faceted nano-polycrystalline synthetic diamond. GIA News From Research, http://www.gia.edu/research-resources/news-from-research/NPD_Diamond.pdf
Skalwold, E.A. (2012) Nano-polycrystalline diamond sphere: a gemologist's perspective. Gems & Gemology, Vol. 48, No. 2, pp. 128-131. http://www.gia.edu/research-resources/gems-gemology/issues/summer2012-contents/summer-2012-skalwold.html

Internet Links for Nano-Polycrystalline DiamondHide

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