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Peterandresenite

This page kindly sponsored by Peter Andresen
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About PeterandreseniteHide

Any gaidonnayites to be seen?
Formula:
Mn4Nb6O19·14H2O
Colour:
Orange
Lustre:
Vitreous, Resinous
Hardness:
2 - 2½
Specific Gravity:
3.10
Crystal System:
Monoclinic
Name:
Named after the Norwegian mineral collector Peter Andresen, who first found the mineral.
The first naturally occurring hexaniobate. It has a novel structure consisting of six edge-sharing NbO6 octahedra forming a super octahedron known as a Lindqvist ion. Three such complex ions are interconnected by one Mn2+-centred octahedron to form a two-dimensional layer perpendicular to c. The second Mn2+-centred octahedron bridges the Lindqvist ion, protrudes into the adjacent layer along c, and takes part in the formation of 3D structure via hydrogen bonds.

Somewhat chemically and visually similar are the heteropolyniobates menezesite and aspedamite. Also chemically similar to hansesmarkite.


Classification of PeterandreseniteHide

Approved
Approval Year:
2012

Physical Properties of PeterandreseniteHide

Vitreous, Resinous
Transparency:
Transparent, Translucent
Colour:
Orange
Streak:
Pale orange
Hardness:
2 - 2½ on Mohs scale
Tenacity:
Brittle
Cleavage:
None Observed
Fracture:
Irregular/Uneven
Density:
3.10(1) g/cm3 (Measured)    3.05 g/cm3 (Calculated)

Optical Data of PeterandreseniteHide

Type:
Biaxial (-)
RI values:
nα = 1.760(5) nβ = 1.795(5) nγ = 1.800(5)
2V:
Measured: 43° (2), Calculated: 40°
Max Birefringence:
δ = 0.040
Image shows birefringence interference colour range (at 30µm thickness)
and does not take into account mineral colouration.
Surface Relief:
Very High
Dispersion:
Strong (r>v)
Pleochroism:
Visible
Comments:
X (colourless) < Z (pale orange)<

Chemical Properties of PeterandreseniteHide

Formula:
Mn4Nb6O19·14H2O
IMA Formula:
Mn4Nb6O19 · 14H2O

Crystallography of PeterandreseniteHide

Crystal System:
Monoclinic
Class (H-M):
2/m - Prismatic
Space Group:
B2/m
Setting:
C2/m
Cell Parameters:
a = 15.329(1) Å, b = 9.4121(5) Å, c = 11.2832(9) Å
β = 118.650(4)°
Ratio:
a:b:c = 1.629 : 1 : 1.199
Unit Cell V:
1428.6 ų
Z:
2

X-Ray Powder DiffractionHide

Powder Diffraction Data:
d-spacingIntensity
9.898(82)
7.710(42)
7.469(39)
7.103(63)
3.410(30)
3.301(20)
2.926(100)
2.029(30)

Type Occurrence of PeterandreseniteHide

General Appearance of Type Material:
It occurs as equidimensional, transparent to translucent orange crystals up to 1 mm with a pale orange streak and a vitreous to resinous lustre.
Place of Conservation of Type Material:
In the collections of the Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway, catalogue numbers 43490 and 43492, and the Mineral Sciences Department, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, Los Angeles, California, USA, catalogue number 64008.
Geological Setting of Type Material:
The mineral was found on fracture surfaces and in tiny vugs in the centre of a miaskitic pegmatite dike.

Synonyms of PeterandreseniteHide

Common AssociatesHide

Associated Minerals Based on Photo Data:
Chiavennite4 photos of Peterandresenite associated with Chiavennite on mindat.org.
Natrolite4 photos of Peterandresenite associated with Natrolite on mindat.org.
Gonnardite2 photos of Peterandresenite associated with Gonnardite on mindat.org.
Fayalite1 photo of Peterandresenite associated with Fayalite on mindat.org.

Other InformationHide

Health Risks:
No information on health risks for this material has been entered into the database. You should always treat mineral specimens with care.

References for PeterandreseniteHide

Reference List:
Sort by Year (asc) | by Year (desc) | by Author (A-Z) | by Author (Z-A)
Friis, H. (2012): From calcite to the first natural hexaniobate or 350 years of mineral science. Acta Crystallogrographica Section A. Foundations of Crystallography. A68, 48 (Abstract).
Friis, H., Larsen, A.O., Kampf, A.R., Evans, R.J., Selbekk, R.S. and Kihle, J. (2013): Peterandresenite, IMA 2012-084. CNMNC Newsletter No. 16, August 2013, page 2696; Mineralogical Magazine, 77, 2695-2709.
Friis, H., Larsen, A.O., Kampf, A.R., Evans, R.J., Selbekk, R.S., Aranda Sanchez, A., Kihle, J. (2014): Peterandresenite, Mn4Nb6O19·14H2O, a new mineral containing the Lindqvist ion from a syenite pegmatite of the Larvik Plutonic Complex, southern Norway. European Journal of Mineralogy: 26: 567-576.

Internet Links for PeterandreseniteHide

Localities for PeterandreseniteHide

This map shows a selection of localities that have latitude and longitude coordinates recorded. Click on the symbol to view information about a locality. The symbol next to localities in the list can be used to jump to that position on the map.

Locality ListHide

- This locality has map coordinates listed. - This locality has estimated coordinates. ⓘ - Click for further information on this occurrence. ? - Indicates mineral may be doubtful at this locality. - Good crystals or important locality for species. - World class for species or very significant. (TL) - Type Locality for a valid mineral species. (FRL) - First Recorded Locality for everything else (eg varieties). Struck out - Mineral was erroneously reported from this locality. Faded * - Never found at this locality but inferred to have existed at some point in the past (eg from pseudomorphs.)

All localities listed without proper references should be considered as questionable.
Namibia
 
  • Erongo Region
    • Dâures
      • Brandberg Area
        • Karlowa Pegmatite Swarm (Hoffmann's pegmatite)
Von Bezing, L., Bode, R. & Jahn S. (2016): Namibia. Minerals and localities II. Edition Krüger-Stiftung, Bode Verlag, p. 452 (Pers. Comm. Bowell 2016)
Norway (TL)
 
  • Vestfold
    • Larvik
      • Tvedalen
        • Tuften (Tuften 1 Quarry; Tuften 2 Quarry)
Friis, H., Larsen, A.O., Kampf, A.R., Evans, R.J., Selbekk, R.S. and Kihle, J. (2013): Peterandresenite, IMA 2012-084. CNMNC Newsletter No. 16, August 2013, page 2696; Mineralogical Magazine, 77, 2695-2709; Friis, H., Larsen, A.O., Kampf, A.R., Evans, R.J., Selbekk, R.S., Aranda Sanchez, A., Kihle, J. (2014): Peterandresenite, Mn4Nb6O19·14H2O, a new mineral containing the Lindqvist ion from a syenite pegmatite of the Larvik Plutonic Complex, southern Norway. European Journal of Mineralogy, 26, 567-576.
Mineral and/or Locality  
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