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Fibrolite

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About FibroliteHide

Formula:
Al2(SiO4)O
Name:
Named in 1802 by Jacques Louis Comte de Bournon because of its fibrous habit. Although fibrolite has priority over sillimanite, the two species were not ultimately recognized as the same species until about 1854 by James Dwight Dana. Despite Dana's adherence to issues of priority, the concept of polymorphism took many years to be fully adopted. Previously, Dana had even relegated kyanite to being a variety of sillimanite. Benjamin Silliman Sr. was also James Dwight Dana's father-in-law.
A variety of Sillimanite

A name for the fibrous form of sillimanite. Fibrolite is generally white to pale yellow and may occur in parallel bundles of fibers that seem to conform to the geometry of adjacent minerals, often in a gentle sweep of bent crystals. Fibrolite is by far the most common variety of sillimanite.

Visit gemdat.org for gemological information about Fibrolite.


Chemical Properties of FibroliteHide

Formula:
Al2(SiO4)O

First Recorded Occurrence of FibroliteHide

Common AssociatesHide

Associated Minerals Based on Photo Data:
5 photos of Fibrolite associated with SillimaniteAl2(SiO4)O
2 photos of Fibrolite associated with K Feldspar
1 photo of Fibrolite associated with BiotiteK(Fe2+/Mg)2(Al/Fe3+/Mg)([Si/Al]Si2O10)(OH/F)2
1 photo of Fibrolite associated with QuartzSiO2
1 photo of Fibrolite associated with Albite-Anorthite Series

Other InformationHide

Health Risks:
No information on health risks for this material has been entered into the database. You should always treat mineral specimens with care.

Internet Links for FibroliteHide

Localities for FibroliteHide

This map shows a selection of localities that have latitude and longitude coordinates recorded. Click on the symbol to view information about a locality. The symbol next to localities in the list can be used to jump to that position on the map.

Locality ListHide

- This locality has map coordinates listed. - This locality has estimated coordinates. ⓘ - Click for further information on this occurrence. ? - Indicates mineral may be doubtful at this locality. - Good crystals or important locality for species. - World class for species or very significant. (TL) - Type Locality for a valid mineral species. (FRL) - First Recorded Locality for everything else (eg varieties). Struck out - Mineral was erroneously reported from this locality. Faded * - Never found at this locality but inferred to have existed at some point in the past (eg from pseudomorphs.)

All localities listed without proper references should be considered as questionable.
France
 
  • Brittany
    • Finistère
      • Plouguin
Lukas, Yann (1978) Roches et minéraux de Bretagne. Editions Ouest-France, 33 pp. [p. 7.]; Chauris, L. (2014) Minéraux de Bretagne. Les Editions du Piat, 229.
India (FRL)
 
  • Tamil Nadu
Jacques Louis Comte de Bournon (1802) Philosophical Transactions, p. 289 and 335.
Japan
 
  • Ibaraki
Shiba, M. (1982) Journal of the Japan Association of Mineralogists, Petrologists and Economic Geologists, 77, 345-355.
Myanmar
 
  • Mandalay Region
    • Pyin-Oo-Lwin District
      • Mogok Township
        • Mogok Valley
Ted Themelis (2008) Gems & mines of Mogok
Ted Themelis (2008) Gems & mines of Mogok
        • Pein-Pyit (Painpyit; Pyan Pyit)
Ted Themelis (2008) Gems and Mines of Mogok
Ted Themelis (2008) Gems and Mines of Mogok
Ted Themelis (2008) Gems & mines of Mogok
Poland
 
  • Lower Silesian Voivodeship
    • Świdnica Co.
      • Gmina Świdnica
Lis, J., Sylwestrzak, H. (1986): Minerały Dolnego Śląska. Instytut Geologiczny, Wydawnictwa Geologiczne, Warszawa, 791 pp.
    • Wałbrzych Co.
      • Gmina Walim
        • Walim
Lis, J., Sylwestrzak, H., 1986. Minerały Dolnego Śląska. Instytut Geologiczny, Wydawnictwa Geologiczne, Warszawa, 791 pp.
Portugal
 
  • Aveiro
    • Arouca
      • Albergaria da Serra
According to pioneer work carried out in the 1950s by C.T Assunção & C.Teixeira (Boletim do Museu e Laboratório Mineralógico e Geológico Faculdadede Ciências, 1954, v.27, pp.7–17).
Spain
 
  • Community of Madrid
I.G.M.E. (1991) Mapa Geológico de España ,1:50.000, Memoria hoja 458. Prádena.
  • Extremadura
    • Cáceres
Merino, E., Villaseca, C., Orejana, D., & Jeffries, T. (2013). Gahnite, chrysoberyl and beryl co-occurrence as accessory minerals in a highly evolved peraluminous pluton: the Belvís de Monroy leucogranite (Cáceres, Spain). Lithos, 179, 137-156.
USA
 
  • Idaho
    • Nez Perce Co.
Robert C. Beste, PG (2005) A Location Guide for Rock Hounds in the United States. 3rd ed. Hobbit Press, St. Louis. 149p.
  • Maine
    • Oxford County
Kunz (1886) Index to the Miscellaneous Documents of the House of Representaives for the first session of the forty-ninth Congress, p. 736
  • North Carolina
    • Buncombe Co.
Wood, Keith Yates (1996) Petrogenesis and Geochemistry of Kyanite-Bearing Pegmatites in the Bumcombe Pegmatite District, North Carolina :Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
    • Wilson Co.
Speer,J.Alexander (1997) The Sims Pluton,Nash And Wilson Counties,North Carolina :NCGS Survey Bulletin 97
  • South Carolina
Speer, J.Alexander.,(1987) Evolution of magmatic AFM mineral assemblages in granitoid rocks :The hornblende+melt = biotite reaction in the Liberty Hill pluton, South Carolina :American Mineralogist,Vol. 72, pg. 863-878 ,1987
Speer, J.Alexander.,(1987) Evolution of magmatic AFM mineral assemblages in granitoid rocks :The hornblende+melt = biotite reaction in the Liberty Hill pluton, South Carolina :American Mineralogist,Vol. 72, pg. 863-878 ,1987
Speer, J.Alexander.,(1987) Evolution of magmatic AFM mineral assemblages in granitoid rocks :The hornblende+melt = biotite reaction in the Liberty Hill pluton, South Carolina :American Mineralogist,Vol. 72, pg. 863-878 ,1987
 
Mineral and/or Locality  
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