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Extracted mats of fibers from rose quartz

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Copyright © George R. Rossman
 
 

Extracted mats of fibers from rose quartz

Copyright © George R. Rossman  - This image is copyrighted. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

The colored inclusions in rose quartz can be extracted as by pink-colored mats dissolution of the quartz in hydrofluoric acid, HF. The photo shows two of these mats that are made of tiny fibers of a mineral related to dumortierite.
The diameter of the right mats is about 1.2 cm. It was extracted from a fist-sized rose quartz specimen.

Photo kindly provided by George R. Rossman.
Copyright George R. Rossman.


This photo has been shown 642 times
Photo added:22nd Apr 2016
Dimensions:730x548px (0.40 megapixels)
View Amir C. Akhavan's Photos

Discuss this Photo

PhotosExtracted mats of fibers from rose quartz

10th Feb 2017 16:24 GMTSophiaJoy MB

Wow, this is amazing!

10th Feb 2017 16:31 GMTTimothy Greenland

Please don't try it yourself - unless you are an expert chemist with all the necessary equipment and waste disposal facilities! And even then, think carefully first... HF is NASTY stuff...


Cheers


Tim

10th Feb 2017 17:12 GMTJoel Dyer

Hi SophiaJoy,


I've read about advanced research - including the use of TEM equipment - into the inclusions in rose quartz and the extraction and purification of these inclusions into fibrous mats.


Have these particular mats been analysed, and have the resuts also pointed to (a) mineral phase(s) similar to dumortierite?


Thanks in advance,

10th Feb 2017 18:34 GMTAlfredo Petrov Manager

Joel, Considering that this photo was uploaded by Dr George Rossman (rossmanite), perhaps the world's most well known researcher currently on causes of colour in minerals, and the person who did the research on the fibers giving colour to rose quartz, I would think there would be no doubts about the ID of these mats ;-)

10th Feb 2017 21:10 GMTRalph Bottrill Manager

The exact nature of the pink mineral is still uncertain, see http://www.quartzpage.de/rose.html and references therein.

10th Feb 2017 22:38 GMTMark Heintzelman Expert

If this is a fully accurate source, then explain the why this "information" is also provided " . . . and it does not form crystal faces or crystals".


I think we would all beg to differ on that "fact":


https://www.mindat.org/loc-5941.html


https://www.mindat.org/loc-20053.html


https://www.mindat.org/loc-122506.html


https://www.mindat.org/loc-8030.html

10th Feb 2017 23:29 GMTAlfredo Petrov Manager

Mark, rose quartz colored by the pink "dumortierite-like" fibers is indeed not known to ever occur as crystals, as far as I know. The pink crystals of quartz are colored by a completely different mechanism, without inclusions of the "dumortierite-like" mineral. A couple of researchers have suggested clarifying this distinction by calling the massive material "rose quartz" and the crystals "pink quartz". It remains to be seen whether this terminology will catch on or not.

11th Feb 2017 00:43 GMTMark Heintzelman Expert

Thanks very much Alfredo, good to know.

It would certainly help if the page Ralph noted also included this observation as well. After all, most of us are aware of "rose colored" quartz crystals, but not as many of us are aware that the chromophores were determined to be so different, so it will raise an eyebrow for those of us with some, but not sufficient, knowledge of this.


My bad.

11th Feb 2017 01:26 GMTRalph Bottrill Manager

Mark, Amir's Quartz Pages clearly discuss the difference between Rose Quartz and Pink quartz (http://www.quartzpage.de/pink.html), but unfortunately this has not caught on with most of the collecting community and certainly not not in gemmology.

11th Feb 2017 04:30 GMTJoel Dyer

Hi Alfredo( and others),


I didn't actually click on the picture, I checked the homepage of the message writer & found no clues as to the real person behind it.... Otherwise, I would have adressed the person here as Dr. Rossman if the message poster was the same. I'm fully aware of who this famous academic is :-) and have read many of his brilliant and interesting papers.


So, I guess I would have got my answer - or nearly in full - just by clicking on the picture...But I don't always click on every picture on all webpages....Why? Well...for varying reasons...


I was just interested in whether the final identity of the dumortierite-like mineral(s) has/have been named, as I'm very interested in inclusions in minerals and gemstones (which are often the same thing).


Hope this clears up some things from my part ;-)


Cheers,

11th Feb 2017 17:05 GMTMark Heintzelman Expert

Yes Ralph, I also see there has been quite a lot of new information added to our own "rose" quartz page since last visited . . . Obviously my head was in someone else's book for some time now and missed note of it all, my sincere apologies.


MRH
 
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