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Modris Baum's Photo Gallery

CJQ-AH5Petedunnite, Apatite Group

Multiple photos available
Franklin Mine, Franklin, Franklin mining district, Sussex Co., New Jersey, USA

Dimensions: 2.5 cm x 3.5 cm x 2 cm

This specimen was found (in the late 1970s) on the lower part of the Trotter Dump – i.e. next to the Buckwheat Pit and just across Evans St. from the Buckwheat Dump, which is the TL for petedunnite. It doesn’t seem unreasonable that, ultimately, this specimen is from the same material.

In any case, a recent EDS scan is virtually identical to that for a specimen of petedunnite that was gifted to me by John Cianciulli (then curator of the Franklin Museum). See [https://www.mindat.org/photo-277531.html]. I have posted an overlay of the scan for this specimen on the scan for the specimen that I got from John. The scans are virtually identical. See the "analysis" child photo.

The scan result was a complete surprise. For all these years, I had kept the specimen not for the green pyroxene (of which there are only a few unbroken crystals), bur rather for the unidentified, red-brown, sort of flattened hexagonal, crystal show on the left. The scan result for this was also a complete surprise. Apparently it is an arsenian member of the apatite group (such as perhaps johnbaumite) with some REE component (such as perhaps britholite). See the scan for further comments. I have posted it as “apatite group” even though that seems like much too generic a term to use in this case.
Photo ID: 925453     Uploaded by: Modris Baum   View Count: 24   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 3066 x 3444 pixels (10.6 Mpix)

TFL-0EACyprine, Andradite

Multiple photos available
Franklin Mine, Franklin, Franklin mining district, Sussex Co., New Jersey, USA

Field of View: 6.7 mm
Largest Crystal Size: 2.5 mm

This is a small example of blue cyprene with orange/brown massive "andradite" from one of the skarn zones at the Franklin Mine. It is from the same material as shown in [https://www.mindat.org/photo-271746.html].

This photo (FOV 6.7 x 4.1) is a close-up of one of the cyprene bands showing that it is actually composed of pretty decent – but not terminated – long prismatic crystals. Interestingly, these crystals look deep blue when viewed from some angles and nearly colorless from others. The longest crystal in this photos is about 2.5 mm.

There is a stereo child photo, higher magnification views of more crsystals, and a couple of full view photos. Some willemite is present. This is shown in a SW UV photo.
Photo ID: 924919     Uploaded by: Modris Baum   View Count: 8   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 1024 x 622 pixels (0.6 Mpix)

WJW-T6FPyrochroite, Mooreite

Multiple photos available
Sterling Mine, Sterling Hill, Ogdensburg, Franklin mining district, Sussex Co., New Jersey, USA

Field of View: 2.45 mm

Pyrochroite crystals partly embedded in mooreite showing very complex re-entrant angles. The mooreite on this part of the specimen is rather dirty, so it doesn't show the usual brilliant luster. There are numerous other, similarly crenellated, pyrochlore crystal groups, some of which are embedded in cleaner, more reflective, mooreite. But I avoided these because I had my hands full dealing just with the reflections from the pyrochlore - never mind from mooreite as well.

To make this photograph, I had to resort to a bit of cheating by exposing for the reflections (without which the structure of the pyrochroite would not be apparent). That resulted in everything else being rather underexposed. To make the mooreite, etc visible, I used various Photoshop tweaks to boost the shadows and subdue the highlights. But, since the dynamic range of the human eye is greater than that of the camera sensor, the final result is actually fairly "natural". That's more or less what the stuff looks like (to me at any rate) through the scope.

The specimen also has small amounts of sussexite and/or fluoborite, fluorite, and a pinkish carbonate (probably rhodochrosite). It is one of several fragments from a larger specimen which also had lawsonbauerite, but I don’t see any on this piece.



Photo ID: 924114     Uploaded by: Modris Baum   View Count: 10   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 3300 x 3827 pixels (12.6 Mpix)

50E-H8KVarennesite

Multiple photos available
Demix-Varennes quarry, Saint-Amable sill, Varennes & St-Amable, Lajemmerais RCM, Montérégie, Québec, Canada

Field of View: 4.4 mm

The varennesite (top center) spans 1.9 mm. It is a small, but well-crystalized, and essentially undamaged, aggregate - no mean feat since varennesite can be extremely brittle (sometimes crumbling at the slightest touch).

However my real reason for posting yet another example of varennesite was to show two unidentified associated minerals. The first of these is the pale pinkish stuff surrounding the little cavity. EDS shows a fairly simple chemistry, but, despite that, I have been unable to come up with a candidate that could plausibly be found at this locality. See the analysis "photo" for more discussion. The second UK is the tiny colorless/white folia in the center of the photo. No attempt was made to analyze these (they are just too small to get a usable sample), but they remind me somewhat of some of the ellingsenite from Aris.

There is second. larger, aggregate of varennesite on the specimen, consisting of mostly broken crystals. But it is of interest because there is another patch of the pink stuff embedded in the aggregate. In addition, what appears to be "smectite" of essentially the same color as the varennesite, is also embedded between some of the varennesite crystals. This is shown in a stereo child photo.

Also on the specimen are a few sprays of makatite (possibly embedded in magadiite). The best of these is shown in another stereo photo.
Photo ID: 923966     Uploaded by: Modris Baum   View Count: 20   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 3216 x 4974 pixels (16.0 Mpix)

ADV-QRKLawsonbauerite

Multiple photos available
Sterling Mine, Sterling Hill, Ogdensburg, Franklin mining district, Sussex Co., New Jersey, USA

Field of View: 6.5 mm

The lath-like crystals shown in the photo are similar to those shown on p. 636 of Pete Dunn’s “Franklin and Sterling Hill, New Jersey: ...”. This habit is distinctly different from that of mooreite – see [http://www.mindat.org/photo-166096.html] or Dunn p. 638.

A sample from this find was also analyzed via qualitative EDS. See [http://www.mindat.org/photo-203973.html] for data and a discussion.

More than half of the field of view in the photo is covered by lawsonbauerite laths. The largest crystal is estimated to be about 1.8 mm (but it is overlapped by another layer of lawsonbauerite, so the “root” can’t be seen.)
The specimen consists of inter-layered lawsonbauerite, sussexite, pyrochroite and rhodochrosite. Most of the layers are thin, but a few of the layers have narrow cavities that permitted the growth of freestanding crystals of all four species.
The “related” (same minID) photos show more of the Lawsonbauerite as well as some of the pyrochroite crystals.
Photo ID: 920956     Uploaded by: Modris Baum   View Count: 22   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 1024 x 707 pixels (0.7 Mpix)

ADV-QRKPyrochroite

Multiple photos available
Sterling Mine, Sterling Hill, Ogdensburg, Franklin mining district, Sussex Co., New Jersey, USA

Field of View: 3.6 mm

A very complex c rystal (or crystals) of pyrochroite with all sorts of re-entrant angles, embedded in lawsonbauerite or mooreite.

Both lawsonbauerite and mooreite) were obseved on other fragments of the original specimen. The lawsonbauerite was verified via EDS - to the extent that that is possible. See [https://www.mindat.org/photo-203973.html]. The mooreite was identified visually. But the stuff here is massive and it's hard to tell which (if either!) of these it is.

Oops! I forgot that I had already posted (a better) photo of this as a child photo elsewhere. I have now given these new photos the same minID, so the older photos will show up as "relatives" (and vice versa).
Photo ID: 920837     Uploaded by: Modris Baum   View Count: 19   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 1024 x 636 pixels (0.7 Mpix)

7TX-8D9Pyrochroite

Multiple photos available
Sterling Mine, Sterling Hill, Ogdensburg, Franklin mining district, Sussex Co., New Jersey, USA

Field of View: 2.3 mm
Largest Crystal Size: 1.8 mm

Complex crystals of pyrochroite partly embedded in massive lawsonbauerite or mooreite. (Both species were obseved on other fragments of the original specimen. The lawsonbauerite was verified via EDS - to the extent that that is possible. See [https://www.mindat.org/photo-203973.html]. The mooreite was identified visually. But this fragment is very small - less than 1 cm in greatest dimension - and the matrix is mostly massive. My guess is that it is lawsonbauerite, but it's hard to be sure.)

The top of the main crystal is flat. I'm not sure if that is an actual termination, a cleavage, or a contact with the matrix. The pyrochroite is actually quite black, but the reflections that I used to highlight the shapes make the crystals look silvery.

The morphology is clearer in stereo. See the child photo. Other (stereo) child photos show the back side and another, less embedded, pyrochroite crystal.
Photo ID: 920829     Uploaded by: Modris Baum   View Count: 11   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 3090 x 4434 pixels (13.7 Mpix)

9LQ-2KXWillemite, Friedelite

Sterling Mine, Sterling Hill, Ogdensburg, Franklin mining district, Sussex Co., New Jersey, USA

Field of View: 2.3 mm
Largest Crystal Size: 1.5 mm

Colorless, transparent, willemite (1.5 mm) crystal with one face selectively with growth figures (or perhaps etched). The crystal sits in/on small orange-yellow friedelite crystals.
Photo ID: 920201     Uploaded by: Modris Baum   View Count: 12   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 1024 x 790 pixels (0.8 Mpix)

YCU-3XDSerpentine Subgroup

Multiple photos available
Buckwheat dump mineral collecting site, Franklin Mine, Franklin, Franklin mining district, Sussex Co., New Jersey, USA

Dimensions: 3.3 cm x 1.8 cm x 2.0 cm
Field of View: 6.5 mm
Largest Crystal Size: 0.1 mm
Weight: 20 g

The analysts commment for the EDS scan was "Probable serpentine. Probably Zn dominant".

Well, apart from fraipontite, the number of Zn dominant serpentines appears to be - zero. So is this this fraipontite (for which the nearby Sterling Mine is one of the TLs)? See the EDS scan for a discussion.

This specomen was found on the Buckwheat dump. The matrix is dark gray limestone or dolomite with a crust of nearly colorless, but Fe stained, dolomite rhombs. It doesn't look like typical "Buckwheat dolomite", so it may not be from the Buckwheat pit.
Photo ID: 920191     Uploaded by: Modris Baum   View Count: 9   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 1024 x 676 pixels (0.7 Mpix)

3F3-M3UClinochlore

Multiple photos available
Buckwheat dump mineral collecting site, Franklin Mine, Franklin, Franklin mining district, Sussex Co., New Jersey, USA

Dimensions: 6 cm x 3 cm x 4 cm
Field of View: 6.8 mm
Weight: 184 g

This isn't supposed to be exciting. It is just an EDS analyzed example of one type of chlorite - probably clinochlore - found on this dump. The matrix is typical dull gray "Buckwheat dolomite", so probably it is originally from the Buckwheat pit. But all sorts of things wind up here ...

As for the ID, EDS isn 't sufficient to say for sure that this is clinochlore - but it seems very likley. See the EDS scan for more discussion.
Photo ID: 920180     Uploaded by: Modris Baum   View Count: 4   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 1024 x 655 pixels (0.7 Mpix)
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