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Nathalie Brandes' Photo Gallery

Three Valley Gap

Three Valley Gap, Revelstoke Mining Division, British Columbia, Canada

Three Valley Lake was created when an ancient rock avalanche from Mt. Griffin blocked the Eagle River.

Rocks around Three Valley Lake include pelitic gneisses and amphibolite. The amphibolite occurs as boudins containing hornblende and plagioclase with lesser quartz, pyroxene, ilmenite, and garnet. The gneisses contain quartz, biotite, garnet and sillimanite. Peak metamorphism in this area is estimated to have occurred 73.4±1.7 Ma. Some lamprophyre dykes, likely of Eocene age, cut across the gneisses.

Photo taken: 24 October 2014

Camera: Nikon FM10
Film: Fuji Superia 200
Photo ID: 965888     Uploaded by: Nathalie Brandes   View Count: 10   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 929 x 617 pixels (0.6 Mpix)

Steam Stamp at Tamarack City

Hubbell, Houghton Co., Michigan, USA

This is the last remaining stamp at the ruins of the mill that served the Ahmeek Mine. Operations at the mill began in 1910. According to the 19 October 1912 edition of the Engineering and Mining Journal, the stamp is a Nordberg compound steam stamp. It dropped 106 times per minute and had the capacity to process 600 tons of ore in 24 hours.

Photo taken: 11 August 2007

Camera: Nikon FM10
Film: Fuji Superia 200
Photo ID: 965887     Uploaded by: Nathalie Brandes   View Count: 9   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 7071 x 4718 pixels (33.4 Mpix)

Lake Tahoe

Lake Tahoe, Alpine Co., California, USA

At 1645 feet deep, Lake Tahoe is the second deepest lake in the United States. It occupies a graben, which is a down-dropped block of crust between normal faults created by tensional stress. Lava flows from Mt. Pluto created a dam that held back water in the graben, forming ancient Lake Tahoe. Eventually, erosion carved and outlet in this lava dam, which is the Truckee River.

I apologise for the lines in the photograph. This was taken long before I could afford a wide angle lens.

Photo taken: 12 November 2000

Camera: Nikkormat FS
Film: Kodak Gold 100
Photo ID: 964314     Uploaded by: Nathalie Brandes   View Count: 13   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 3434 x 1042 pixels (3.6 Mpix)

Tabor Opera House

Leadville, Leadville Mining District, Lake Co., Colorado, USA

The Tabor Opera House was built by Horace Tabor in 1879 for a cost of $40,000. Tabor lost his fortune in the 1893 Silver Crash and in 1901 the building was sold to the Elks. It was almost demolished in 1955, but Evelyn Livingston Furman purchased the building and it remained in her family until 2016, when the City of Leadville purchased the property.

Photo taken: 3 November 2010

Camera: Nikon FM10
Film: Fuji Superia 200
Photo ID: 964313     Uploaded by: Nathalie Brandes   View Count: 3   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 4325 x 6667 pixels (28.8 Mpix)

Sulitjelma Smelter

Sulitjelma, Fauske, Nordland, Norway

Ores at Sulitjelma are a stratabound volcanogenic massive sulphide (VMS) deposit. They were initially discovered in 1858, but mining did not begin until 1887. The mines closed in 1991.

A 1922 edition of the Engineering and Mining Journal reports that a new electrical furnace for smelting had been developed by Jens Westley, the metallurgical engineer at Sulitjelma, making it the world’s first electric copper smelting works.

Photo taken: 27 July 2012

Camera: Nikon FM10
Film: Fuji Superia 200
Photo ID: 963054     Uploaded by: Nathalie Brandes   View Count: 13   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 7083 x 4531 pixels (32.1 Mpix)

Ripple Marks in Sturgeon Quartzite

Sturgeon quartzite, Menominee iron range, Dickinson Co., Michigan, USA

The Sturgeon Quartzite is part of the Chocolay Group, which includes the underlying glacial sediments of the Fern Creek Formation and the overlying Randville Dolomite. Ripple marks and cross-beds are common in the Sturgeon Quartzite. The depositional environment is interpreted as a shoreline during a transgression.

Photo taken: 10 May 2003

Camera: Nikkormat FS
Film: Kodak Gold 100
Photo ID: 963052     Uploaded by: Nathalie Brandes   View Count: 8   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 1050 x 1461 pixels (1.5 Mpix)

Maui

Maui, Maui Co., Hawaii, USA

This is Maui viewed from the Big Island on a clear day. Maui consists of two shield volcanoes. The east shield volcano, Haleakalā, last erupted between 1480 and 1600 and is monitored for activity by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

Date taken: 17 May 2019

Camera: Nikon D600
Photo ID: 962254     Uploaded by: Nathalie Brandes   View Count: 9   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 4512 x 3008 pixels (13.6 Mpix)

Kīlauea Iki

Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Co., Hawaii, USA

Kīlauea Iki erupted in 1959. There were seventeen eruptive phases of fire fountains that fed a lava lake. Between fountaining episodes, the lake drained back into the vent. The highest fire fountain created was ~580 m (~1900 ft). At the end of the 1959 eruption, a ~135 m (~440 ft) deep lava lake remained. Since the eruption, scientists have drilled into the lava lake numerous times to study cooling and solidification processes. By the mid-1990s, all the lava had solidified.

In addition to the extremely high fire fountains, the 1959 Kīlauea Iki was unusual for its picritic lavas with very abundant large olivine phenocrysts.

Beyond the solidified surface of the lava lake in the photograph is the Kīlauea summit and Halema'uma'u Crater and the mountain in the distance is Mauna Loa.

Date taken: 14 May 2019

Camera: Nikon D600

Mindat.org Photo of the Day - 22nd Jun 2019
Photo ID: 962253     Uploaded by: Nathalie Brandes   View Count: 299   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 4512 x 3008 pixels (13.6 Mpix)

Accretionary Lapilli

Kau Desert, Hawaii Co., Hawaii, USA

Accretionary lapilli form as fine ash particles stick together around condensing water droplets in an eruption cloud. This accretionary lapilli tuff was erupted in the 1790 phreatomagmatic eruption of Kīlauea that became a turning point in Hawaiian history. At that time, Keōua and Kamehameha were battling for control of the island. As Keōua, his warriors, and their families were passing Kīlauea, it erupted, killing at least eighty people but probably many more. The disaster also suggested to the survivors that the goddess Pele was displeased with Keōua, eventually allowing Kamehameha to secure control of the island. Footprints of Keōua’s people are preserved in this ash deposit.

Date taken: 13 May 2019

Camera: Nikon D600
Photo ID: 962252     Uploaded by: Nathalie Brandes   View Count: 16   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 4512 x 3008 pixels (13.6 Mpix)

Pāhoehoe lava

Kau Desert, Hawaii Co., Hawaii, USA

The ropy surface of pāhoehoe lava is created as the top of the lava flow cools and is folded and wrinkled by the hot lava still flowing underneath. This pāhoehoe flow erupted from Kīlauea 800 to 900 years ago.

Date taken: 13 May 2019

Camera: Nikon D600
Photo ID: 960849     Uploaded by: Nathalie Brandes   View Count: 10   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 4512 x 3008 pixels (13.6 Mpix)
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