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Becky Coulson's Photo Gallery

Gairía volcano, Fuerteventura

Caldera de Gairía, Antigua, Fuerteventura, Las Palmas Province, Canary Islands, Spain

Caldera de Gairía, a well preserved basaltic cone near the village of Tiscamanita in central Fuerteventura, is approximately 460 meters high and is one of the youngest volcanoes on the island.
Photo ID: 890521     Uploaded by: Becky Coulson   View Count: 28   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 3072 x 2044 pixels (6.3 Mpix)

Mt. Tindaya, Fuerteventura

Fuerteventura, Las Palmas Province, Canary Islands, Spain

Mt. Tindaya, in north-central Fuerteventura, is an unusual 400m dome of quartz-trachyte, aged at 18.7 Ma and exposed by erosion. It stands above the plain of Esquinzo, and the pale color is in contrast to the more usual, darker basaltic hills nearby. The quartz-trachyte, with beautiful Liesegang rings, was a popular building stone until the site was protected and quarrying ended. Tindaya was considered sacred by the aboriginal inhabitants (Guanches or Majojeros) and "podomorphs", which are carvings of footprints, are abundant there.
Photo ID: 890520     Uploaded by: Becky Coulson   View Count: 35   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 2592 x 1152 pixels (3.0 Mpix)

Dikes exposed at Barranco de Los Molinos, Fuerteventura

Fuerteventura Basal Complex, Fuerteventura, Las Palmas Province, Canary Islands, Spain

Ultramafic dikes and gabbros are abundant in the Barranco de Los Molinos (village of Puertito de Los Molinos), west-central Fuerteventura.
Photo ID: 889685     Uploaded by: Becky Coulson   View Count: 39   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 2592 x 1728 pixels (4.5 Mpix)

Disused syenite quarry at Barranco de las Peñitas, Fuerteventura

Fuerteventura Basal Complex, Fuerteventura, Las Palmas Province, Canary Islands, Spain

My husband, John, examining syenite at the disused quarry area at Barranco de las Peñitas. The syenite was intruded in the Miocene and subsequently exposed by rapid erosion of overlying volcanics. Barranco de las Peñitas is now a "protected natural area" and collecting is no longer permitted. Photo taken 2014.
Photo ID: 889677     Uploaded by: Becky Coulson   View Count: 29   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 1827 x 1219 pixels (2.2 Mpix)

Syenite at Barranco de las Peñitas, Fuerteventura

Fuerteventura Basal Complex, Fuerteventura, Las Palmas Province, Canary Islands, Spain

Barranco de las Peñitas (Ravine of the Penitents) is actually a continuation of Barranco de Ajuy, where layers were exposed by crustal rebound following a massive Miocene landslide and subsequent erosion. Between the two barranco sections, multiple dikes, pyroxenites and gabbros are exposed in the barranco walls. As you approach the Barranco de las Peñitas, a Miocene intrusion of syenitic composition is exposed and continues as you climb in elevation toward the village of Vega de Rio Palma above. The syenite was exposed following rapid erosion of overlying volcanics in the Miocene-Oligocene.
Photo ID: 889676     Uploaded by: Becky Coulson   View Count: 26   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 2592 x 1944 pixels (5.0 Mpix)

View along the west coast at Ajuy Natural Monument, Fuerteventura

Fuerteventura Basal Complex, Fuerteventura, Las Palmas Province, Canary Islands, Spain

A view along the coastal rock exposures at Ajuy Natural Monument, west-central Fuerteventura. A path leads from the Barranco de Ajuy to several sea caves at the distant point in the photo. Along the way, many layers of uplifted crustal rocks and multiple dikes are clearly visible. A massive Miocene landslide, followed by crustal rebound and subsequent erosion, exposed the ancient layers, which include pillow basalts, volcanic breccias, Jurassic sediments, older basalt flows and many basaltic and trachytic dikes. Collecting is not allowed in the natural monument.
Photo ID: 889672     Uploaded by: Becky Coulson   View Count: 28   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 2580 x 1719 pixels (4.4 Mpix)

Volcanic breccia and Jurassic sediments, Ajuy Natural Monument

Fuerteventura Basal Complex, Fuerteventura, Las Palmas Province, Canary Islands, Spain

Volcanic breccia and Jurassic sediments exposed along the path leading from the Barranco de Ajuy to the sea caves at Ajuy Natural Monument, Ajuy, Fuerteventura. The layers were uplifted and exposed following a massive Miocene landslide and subsequent crustal rebound, followed by rapid erosion. Collecting is not allowed within the small natural monument.
Photo ID: 889668     Uploaded by: Becky Coulson   View Count: 23   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 1725 x 2589 pixels (4.5 Mpix)

Sub-fossil Hymenopteran nests in Fuerteventura

Multiple photos available
Fuerteventura, Las Palmas Province, Canary Islands, Spain

Early Pleistocene fossil (or sub-fossil) Hymenopteran nests (brood cells) at Cotillo, NW Fuerteventura. Large clusters of such nests are common throughout the island, especially near the coasts, where soft, ancient calcareous sand dunes are found. They are thought to be from solitary bees. They measure a few centimeters in length, and some are quite fragile while others hard. Many show the obvious opening, but others are closed and presumably indicate mortality. For further reading about these see:

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/289088454_Fossil_brood_cells_of_solitary_bees_on_Fuerteventura_and_Lanzarote_Canary_Islands_ Hymenoptera_Apoidea
Photo ID: 889663     Uploaded by: Becky Coulson   View Count: 81   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 2250 x 1498 pixels (3.4 Mpix)

Dikes exposed at Barranco de Ajuy, Fuerteventura

Fuerteventura Basal Complex, Fuerteventura, Las Palmas Province, Canary Islands, Spain

Dark basaltic dikes intruding rocks exposed at Barranco de Ajuy (coastal village of Ajuy), western central Fuerteventura. The rock layers were uplifted by crustal rebound following a massive Miocene landslide and subsequent erosion. The cross-cutting dikes and lighter intruded rock are about 4 meters across. Pillow basalt can be seen at top, followed by Jurassic sediments and older basalt heavily intruded by dikes. Taken April 2018.
Photo ID: 889658     Uploaded by: Becky Coulson   View Count: 66   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 2599 x 1949 pixels (5.1 Mpix)

Exposed crustal rocks at Barranco de Ajuy, Fuerteventura

Fuerteventura Basal Complex, Fuerteventura, Las Palmas Province, Canary Islands, Spain

Uplifted and exposed rock layers at Barranco de Ajuy (at the coastal village of Ajuy, also known as Puerto de la Peña ), western central Fuerteventura. At top there are pillow basalts, with vugs filled with cream-colored calcite and calcrete. Below is a layer of ancient (Jurassic) sediment followed by basalts intruded by multiple basaltic and trachytic dikes. The dry barranco can be followed eastward to the well-known syenite outcrops of the basal complex. Exposures and samples of pyroxenites and gabbros are common along the barranco walls. It was formerly thought that the basal complex represented an ophiolite, but recent research (off-shore drill cores) indicates that the uplift was caused by a massive, Miocene-age landslide that caused crustal rebound followed by erosion that has exposed the rocks. It is certainly a unique occurrence in the Canary Islands. My husband John included for scale; the beach is just to the left in this photo. April 2018.
Photo ID: 889561     Uploaded by: Becky Coulson   View Count: 129   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 3072 x 2304 pixels (7.1 Mpix)
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