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Krasnoyarsk meteorite (Krasnojarsk meteorite), Krasnoyarsk Krai, Eastern-Siberian Region, Russia

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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 54° 53' 59'' North , 91° 47' 59'' East
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 54.90000,91.80000
GeoHash:G#: y1c22fnxx
Locality type:Meteorite Fall Location
Meteorite Class:Anomalous PMG pallasite meteorite
Meteoritical Society Class:Pallasite, PMG-an
Metbull:View entry in Meteoritical Bulletin Database
Köppen climate type:Dfc : Subarctic climate


Pallasite, Main Group (PMG-an)

A mass of about 700 kg was detected in 1749 about 145 miles south of Krasnoyarsk. It was seen by P.S. Pallas in 1772 and then on his orders transported to Saint Petersburg. For a considerable time it was described simply as the 'Pallas Iron.'

Krasnojarsk was the first pallasite meteorite ever found and studied and lead to the creation of the Pallasite group named after Pallas. It was also the first meteorite ever etched with acid (by G. Thomson) and therefore was the first one to show to human eyes the Widmanstätten pattern.

The main mass of 515 kg is now in Moscow at the Fersman Mineralogical Museum, Russian Academy of Sciences.

Regions containing this locality

Soviet Union (1922-1991)

Country (Former) - 3,641 mineral species & varietal names listed

Siberian Federal District, Russia

District - 1,281 mineral species & varietal names listed

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


4 valid minerals.

Meteorite/Rock Types Recorded

Note: this is a very new system on mindat.org and data is currently VERY limited. Please bear with us while we work towards adding this information!

Select Rock List Type

Alphabetical List Tree Diagram

Detailed Mineral List:

'Anomalous PMG pallasite meteorite'
Reference: Meteoritical Society Database
Farringtonite
Formula: Mg3(PO4)2
Reference: Fuchs L H, Osen E, Gebert E (1973) New X-ray and compositional data for farringtonite, Mg3(PO4)2, American Mineralogist 58, 949-951
'Fayalite-Forsterite Series'
Reference: P.S.Pallas, Reise durch die verschiedenen Provinzen des russischen Reichs. St.Petersburg 1776
Iron
Formula: Fe
Reference: P.S.Pallas, Reise durch die verschiedenen Provinzen des russischen Reichs. St.Petersburg 1776
Iron var: Kamacite
Formula: (Fe,Ni)
Reference: Buseck, P.R. (1977) Pallasite meteorites-mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 41:711-740.
Taenite
Formula: (Fe,Ni)
Reference: Buseck, P.R. (1977) Pallasite meteorites-mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 41:711-740.
Tetrataenite
Formula: FeNi
Reference: Jijin Yang, Joseph I. Goldstein & Edward R. D. Scott (2010) Main-group pallasites: Thermal history, relationship to IIIA irons and origin. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 74:4471-4492.

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 1 - Elements
'Iron'1.AE.05Fe
var: Kamacite1.AE.05(Fe,Ni)
Taenite1.AE.10(Fe,Ni)
Tetrataenite1.AE.10FeNi
Group 8 - Phosphates, Arsenates and Vanadates
'Farringtonite'8.AB.05Mg3(PO4)2
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Anomalous PMG pallasite meteorite'-
'Fayalite-Forsterite Series'-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 1 - NATIVE ELEMENTS AND ALLOYS
Metals, other than the Platinum Group
Iron
var: Kamacite
1.1.11.1(Fe,Ni)
Taenite1.1.11.2(Fe,Ni)
Tetrataenite1.1.11.3FeNi
Group 38 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL PHOSPHATES, ARSENATES, AND VANADATES
(AB)3(XO4)2
Farringtonite38.3.1.2Mg3(PO4)2
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Anomalous PMG pallasite meteorite'-
'Fayalite-Forsterite Series'-
Iron-Fe

List of minerals for each chemical element

OOxygen
O FarringtoniteMg3(PO4)2
MgMagnesium
Mg FarringtoniteMg3(PO4)2
PPhosphorus
P FarringtoniteMg3(PO4)2
FeIron
Fe IronFe
Fe Iron (var: Kamacite)(Fe,Ni)
Fe Taenite(Fe,Ni)
Fe TetrataeniteFeNi
NiNickel
Ni Iron (var: Kamacite)(Fe,Ni)
Ni Taenite(Fe,Ni)
Ni TetrataeniteFeNi

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Cambrian
485.4 - 541 Ma



ID: 3187392
Paleozoic sedimentary rocks

Age: Cambrian (485.4 - 541 Ma)

Lithology: Sedimentary rocks

Reference: Chorlton, L.B. Generalized geology of the world: bedrock domains and major faults in GIS format: a small-scale world geology map with an extended geological attribute database. doi: 10.4095/223767. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 5529. [154]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Pallas, P.S. (1776), Reise durch die verschiedenen Provinzen des russischen Reichs. St.Petersburg.
Chladni, E.F.F. (1798), Observation on a mass of iron found in Siberia by Professor Pallas, and other masses of the like kind, with some conjectures respecting their connection with certain natural phenomena. Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science: 2: 1-8.
Buseck, P.R. (1977) Pallasite meteorites-mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 41:711-740.
Grady, M. M. (2000) Catalogue of Meteorites (5/e). Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, New York, Oakleigh, Madrid, Cape Town. 690 pages.
Norton, O. Richard (2002). The Cambridge encyclopedia of meteorites. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0521621437.
Yang, J., Goldstein, J.I. & Scott, E. R. D. (2010) Main-group pallasites: Thermal history, relationship to IIIA irons and origin. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 74:4471-4492.

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